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message 1: by Jamie (JK), Houdini Mod (last edited Aug 30, 2010 08:38AM) (new)

Jamie (JK) (eimajtl) | 703 comments Mod
September's Book of the Month is Ender's Game by Orson Scott Card! This is the spoiler free addition so be mindful of what you mention in your posts.


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To kinda start off a discussion on one aspect of the series, let's talk about the world Card builds. You'll quickly find out that in this world population is controlled. Couples are supposed to have two children and no more. The protagonist of Ender's Game, Ender, is what's referred to as a third - pretty self explanatory title there.

It's a small piece of information, one of the few that you'll get about the actual world, but it's interesting and does tell you a lot. Any thoughts on the way population is regulated?


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Stats

Book: Ender's Game (Ender Saga #1)
Author: Orson Scott Card
Genre: SciFi
Nominator: Keith
Month: September 2010
BotM Number: 2


message 2: by Dian, Crazy Nooooob Mod! :D (new)

Dian | 440 comments Mod
What I find interesting is that he even thought of that as a possible future cause this was written in the 70s when population and overpopulation wasn't in the forefront of most peoples minds. Today its a very real issue, back then it was still a concept a lot of ppl were just learning about.


message 3: by Mary (last edited Aug 30, 2010 09:20PM) (new)

Mary (med401) | 234 comments I believe the zero population growth movement gained popularity in the US in the '70's. The hippies and environmentalists embraced it. But you're still right. It was a fringe cause, the general population would have went "huh? zero what? That crazy crap?"

Edit: I think I'm going to follow this thread for now since it's been so long since I read this book. It's almost like reading it for the first time. I've forgotten a lot of the details.


message 4: by Dian, Crazy Nooooob Mod! :D (new)

Dian | 440 comments Mod
I know what you mean, there are a lot of times that when i haven't read a story in awhile i remember the general stuff that happens but some of the plot lines i forget. And its not always the small stuff either.


message 5: by Nora aka Diva, The Diva Mod (last edited Aug 31, 2010 03:17AM) (new)

Nora aka Diva (DuctTapeDiva) | 391 comments Mod
JK wrote: "September's Book of the Month is Ender's Game by Orson Scott Card! This is the spoiler free addition so be mindful of what you mention in your posts. "

Oh hell, you people hate me, don't you?
Skipping September's book.


message 6: by Jamie (JK), Houdini Mod (new)

Jamie (JK) (eimajtl) | 703 comments Mod
I wasn't pleased with the selection much either.


message 7: by Glodson, MIA Mod (new)

Glodson | 235 comments Mod
Yea, I mean, I loved the book, but I've read the book.

However, with how busy I am, maybe it is a good thing that I've read it. I can still discuss it, as I remember it well, but I won't feel guilty for not having the time to read it again.


message 8: by Mary (new)

Mary (med401) | 234 comments Yes and next month we can feel free to pick something completely different. Not fantasy or sci fi.

I'm happy with ender's game simply because it's been so long since I read it. But I can understand how others feel differently. Maybe if we pick something different more people will participate. Not everyone likes the genre we've been in so far.

I propose no sci fi or fantasy nominations next month. Should I make a thread?


message 9: by Dian, Crazy Nooooob Mod! :D (last edited Aug 31, 2010 09:55PM) (new)

Dian | 440 comments Mod
We might also define what is considered sci fi and fantasy. Our first two books have clearly fallen into that group but there are a lot of books that I wouldn't consider as fantasy but others do. For instance I am currently reading The Hunger Games, which btw I'm falling in love with, that I feel could fall into that uncertain realm. I don't consider it fantasy but I can see why others might since it is set in a post apocalyptic world. I mainly point this out cause I'm dying to suggest this book for October >.> <.<


message 10: by Mary (new)

Mary (med401) | 234 comments Yeah, I'm not trying to make anyone feel like their book isn't welcome. I'm just trying to make our little club more diverse. I'm pretty sure I'm jumping the gun, two months isn't much of a streak. Maybe if left alone, the members would go outside sci fi/fantasy on their own for variety's sake.

I just couldn't help but notice that less than half the club voted on this month's poll. I wasn't sure if it was book selection, busyness(school,etc.), or people losing interest in the club itself. We're probably lucky to retain as many active members as we have. This is kind of how it goes with these things.

In closing, maybe I should just leave it alone, see how next month goes, and then maybe make my radical suggestion of no sci fi if it seems appropriate.


message 11: by Apollo (last edited Sep 01, 2010 01:37AM) (new)

Apollo Frimel | 63 comments Dian wrote: "set in a post apocalyptic world"


You just reminded me of a book that will be my next recommendation Way of the Wolf. Unless we do decide to ban fantasy books for a month. Which I actually wouldn't mind the girl with the dragon tattoo seems interesting.


message 12: by Katt_goddess (new)

Katt_goddess | 267 comments Taiwan has had a population control in place for awhile along with pretty much a goodly chunk of China. The government pays for the spay and neutering of the humans after having one living child for the good of the community. Of course, since many families put a high stock on having a male child, there can be a lot of mysterious weight gains and losses before some families actually have a child. But if you have the government snip and still manage to get pregnant, you can keep it. I know someone who that happened to, she said that after that, the government re-surgery consisted of tieing one tube to an ankle and the other tube to an armpit to keep things from healing back together. :D


message 13: by Alexander (last edited Sep 06, 2010 10:48PM) (new)

Alexander (alexanderon) That was actually one thing I was worried about--it seems like most people in here read fantasy novels ... and just fantasy novels. While I find such books okay, they're never really page-turners for me. The Name of the Wind certainly wasn't.

Plus, there's so many hilarious and tragic stories based on peoples' actual lives that I've never seen the need to delve into fantastical stories. Even when it comes to modern fiction, authors draw inspiration from their own life. Look at someone like Hemingway. Half of the characters in To Have and Have Not are caricatures of himself and his previous wives.

Stuff like that ... when you read books knowing that about authors ... it's just instantaneously more hilarious and intricate. And dragons and wizards just come off as too cliche and dull as a result. I like a good book I can relate to, where I can hold the book in my hands and say "Holy shit, I totally have done that."

And I'd like it if the November novel isn't sci-fi or fantasy as well.

/rant


message 14: by Keith (new)

Keith (oafaye) | 60 comments Alexander wrote: "And I'd like it if the November novel isn't sci-fi or fantasy as well."

But this club is in the "Science Fiction & Fantasy" category...


message 15: by Jamie (JK), Houdini Mod (new)

Jamie (JK) (eimajtl) | 703 comments Mod
That's only because it made me pick a subcategory when making the group - though now it's Literature & Fiction. Didn't notice that one the first time around.


message 16: by Alexander (new)

Alexander (alexanderon) Keith wrote: But this club is in the "Science Fiction & Fantasy" category...

I'm not really concerned with what the category is. You're heavily pigeonholing yourself from a lot of amazing books by narrowly focusing on fantasy and science-fiction which, to be honest, have a heavy amount of overlap and tropism. It just kinda gets old after a while.


message 17: by Mary (last edited Sep 07, 2010 10:27PM) (new)

Mary (med401) | 234 comments You may like what I plan to recommend for next month, it's fact based historical fiction. I'm not going to say what until I nominate but it's a author who does his research and gets the history right. That sounds like something you might enjoy.

And Keith, there's battles, swords, and blood in it too. You know, just as a bonus. I'm planning on that one because I think it might bridge some of the interest gaps. Maybe. No magic or wizards though, unless you count priests and saints. :D


message 18: by Punkyplatypus (new)

Punkyplatypus | 25 comments ....i don't mind a genre cap to allow others to read what they're interested in...i wouldn't mind venturing into something different, though these first two books have been enjoyable for me...

....on topic: other than on here, i had heard good things about this book....from the title i expected a serial killer type story, and once i saw the cover i was confused....


message 19: by Glodson, MIA Mod (new)

Glodson | 235 comments Mod
Alexander wrote: "I'm not really concerned with what the category is. You're heavily pigeonholing yourself from a lot of amazing books by narrowly focusing on fantasy and science-fiction which, to be honest, have a heavy amount of overlap and tropism. It just kinda gets old after a while.
"


This is why I wanted to start this club. I have pigeonholed myself really into a few genres. I am in a literary rut, as I gravitate to what I am most comfortable with. The hopes with this club is that I would force myself to break out of this mold.

So far, not going as planned, but I am happy that others in enjoying it and participating. Besides, two months is a poor sample size, sooner or later, a book that I would never have tried on my own will be the Book of the Month. Besides, it has worked out nicely that the first two books were ones I've read. My time right now, as some of you might have noticed, is severely limited.


message 20: by Katt_goddess (new)

Katt_goddess | 267 comments I think that since everyone is free to nominate something per month and then it's all voted on [anonymously I think? I've never bothered to delve beyond my own vote], things have a good chance of evolving past one particular genre to include others. I know I'm not keeping my potential nominations to purely sci-fi / fantasy stuff although I do have a lot of those floating around waiting to be read. :D


message 21: by Andra (new)

Andra | 75 comments I've nominated books that aren't sci-fi or fantasy but they don't seem to get to many votes. I think unless everyone nominates a book that isn't sci-fi or fantasy then it's unlikely that we'll be reading different categories.


message 22: by Mary (new)

Mary (med401) | 234 comments I'm saving up the no sci fi or fantasy nominations suggestion for month after next. That's if next month ends up in that category too. I might be outvoted but I'll suggest it then if appropriate. Just for variety's sake.


message 23: by Punkyplatypus (new)

Punkyplatypus | 25 comments ....perhaps we should have two books per month, each from a different genre.....we'll leave the decision of what belongs to what genre up to the group leaders' discretion...that way a whole genre doesn't end up getting banned for a month...also, quick readers wil have more to read so they don't get bored halfway through the month and individuals will still have a choice after the voting...


message 24: by Mary (last edited Sep 14, 2010 08:09PM) (new)

Mary (med401) | 234 comments I'm glad to have a quick read, it gives me time to get to other books on my list. I know banning an entire genre is kinda extreme but it would only be for one month, not forever. Hell we had a quick read this month and I just got done. I just don't seem to have time to read lately. Typical, since I just joined a book club.

Anyway, we'll see what we come up with for October and then we can talk about it. I'm not going to pitch a fit if my idea isn't taken up.


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