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GENERAL CONVERSATION > September-October 2010 Chat

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JoAnn/QuAppelle | 1608 comments Mod
Chat here about "whatever" for the next two months


message 2: by Robin (new)

Robin (goodreadscomtriviagoddessl) thanks joann for letting me join. I am Robin from Hawaii, i just happened to come across Goodreads last month, and as enjoying taking the trivia tests. This is a neat website. I told my sister0in-law about it, don't know if she'll join. I love to read mostly fiction, some Sue Grafton, Michael Crichton, etc.


message 3: by Dorota (new)

Dorota (readinggirl91) | 2 comments I just joined this website a week or so ago. I love it. It is good to take a trip down memory lane and remember all the books I've read. I just finished The Rembrandt Affair and I liked it. It had everything a good book should have: good plot, action and suspense.


JoAnn/QuAppelle | 1608 comments Mod
Welcome Robin and Dorota.

Glad to see you here.


message 5: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) Welcome, Doroata and Robin. :)

And Mana from Iraq, too ! Wow! The Internet sure makes the world a smaller place.


Donna in Southern Maryland (cedarville922) | 133 comments Mod
Welcome to our 3 new posters! We are very glad to have you join our conversation - about books or whatever!

Donna in Southern Maryland


Donna in Southern Maryland (cedarville922) | 133 comments Mod
Barbara wrote: "I'm also new to Good Reads & I'm finding it lots of fun.
Right now I'm almost finished with THE PARTICULAR SADNESS OF LEMON CAKE by Aimee Bender & I'm having a difficult time liking any of these c..."


Welcome Barbara! I'm glad you joined us. I read the synopsis of your book and decided it wasn't my cup of tea. But I have a sayin': "Life is too short to waste on any book you are not enjoying!" Bless that book and release it! How many others do you have waiting!?!

Donna in Southern Maryland


message 8: by Emma (new)

Emma (merebuilt) Hi, I'm Emma and I'm new to Goodreads. I'm 18 from England and I blatantly love reading. My favourite genre is True-life stories but I also love any fiction!


message 9: by Robin (new)

Robin (goodreadscomtriviagoddessl) Thanks Joann for the welcome. I am one of those readers who gets so absorbed in a book that I sometimes forget that I also am a wife and mother. Hi everyone.


message 10: by Meredith (new)

Meredith | 5 comments Barbara wrote: "I'm also new to Good Reads & I'm finding it lots of fun.
Right now I'm almost finished with THE PARTICULAR SADNESS OF LEMON CAKE by Aimee Bender & I'm having a difficult time liking any of these c..."


Hi Barbara, Greetings from Pittsburgh. I'm also a newbie to GoodReads. I'm 80% finished with The Particular Sadness of Lemon Cake (can't you tell a Kindle owner?) and I feel the same way. Usually though, I don't finish a book I'm not enjoying, but I think I'll finish this one. Not terribly sure why. One of the things that most bothers me about the book is, apart from what you mentioned about not liking the characters, is that the protagonist isn't believable. Even if we can suspend disbelief and accept that fact that she can taste the emotions of others, how can this child, particular this young child at the beginning of the story, know and understand these complex, nuanced emotions? I'm afraid Aimee Bender lost me there.
Anyway, cheers and welcome aboard!


message 11: by JoAnn/QuAppelle (new)

JoAnn/QuAppelle | 1608 comments Mod
Meredith, where in Pittsburgh do you live?

I lived there eons ago when I first got married, first in an apartment in Greentree, then in McMurray/Peter's Twp. in the South Hills. I taught in Upper St. Clair before I had children.

Pittsburgh is one of my favorite cities. So interesting, so much to do, so many great restaurants.


message 12: by DeeAnn (new)

DeeAnn (anndeehi) Donna in Southern Maryland wrote: "Barbara wrote: "I'm also new to Good Reads & I'm finding it lots of fun.
Right now I'm almost finished with THE PARTICULAR SADNESS OF LEMON CAKE by Aimee Bender & I'm having a difficult time liking..."


Im' with you Donna. There are hundreds of thousands of books to read, don't waste your time on one you don't like or can't get into just because someone else thinks it is good.

I'm DeeAnn and new to this group too. I just started a new series from an author I love, Susan Wittig Albert. The book is The Darling Dahlias and the Cucumber Tree. It is set in the 1930s in Alabama. I am halfway through (in one day) and loving it.


message 13: by Meredith (new)

Meredith | 5 comments Hi JoAnn,

I live in Mt. Lebanon, so South Hills as well! I've lived here for 25 years now and agree it's a wonderful city, a great place to live, raise children, and eat. You're right, we do have many great restaurants. So, why is it that we are never mentioned in any of the big foodie mags?? (In fact, I'm on a mission to get our good restaurants some nat'l press......)

Where do you live now?


message 14: by JoAnn/QuAppelle (new)

JoAnn/QuAppelle | 1608 comments Mod
Meredith wrote: "Hi JoAnn,

I live in Mt. Lebanon, so South Hills as well! I've lived here for 25 years now and agree it's a wonderful city, a great place to live, raise children, and eat. "


I adore Mt. Lebanon. Some parts of it are so quaint. When I lived in Greentree and drove to teach in Upper St. Clair, I used (often) the Mt. Lebanon Library. Several people with who I taught lived in your town. This was in the mid 1970s.

I now live in SE Pennsylvania, just across the border from Delaware and have a house in Bethany Beach, Delaware. Lots of people from Pittsburgh go there for vacations.


message 15: by Robin (new)

Robin (goodreadscomtriviagoddessl) Hi everyone, I live in Hawaii. in a small suburb of Kailua. I have lived in Kailua most of my life, I have traveled to the "mainland" what we call the contiguous United States. At times we get rock fever, especially before school started this year we went to the Big Island for a few days. Even though, it is just a neighboring island, it made a difference on our outlook for the new year.


message 16: by JoAnn/QuAppelle (new)

JoAnn/QuAppelle | 1608 comments Mod
Welcome, Robin! Hope to see you here often.

My daughter and son-in-law are going to Kauai in December for their tenth anniversary. They are so looking forward to it. I am totally ignorant of the geography of your area...how far are you from where she is going?

I remember falling in love with Hawaii after reading Michener's book many years ago.


message 17: by Robin (new)

Robin (goodreadscomtriviagoddessl) Hi JoAnn, We are on a different island, I am on Oahu and she would be going to Kauai, there is also Niihau, Kahoolawe, The Big Island, which consists of Hilo, the rainy side and Kona the drier side, with lots of beaches. If you watch Lost, the episodes are filmed on the windward side of the island near where we are. Thanks for asking. Kauai is a very lush and tropical island, there is Lihue which is a small town, the only thing about Kauai, since it is a small town everything closes early. There is lots to see and do there.


message 18: by JoAnn/QuAppelle (new)

JoAnn/QuAppelle | 1608 comments Mod
Robin wrote: "Kauai is a very lush and tropical island, there is Lihue which is a small town, the only thing about Kauai, since it is a small town everything closes early. There is lots to see and do there. ..."

They are looking forward to this trip. My daughter did a lot of research so I am sure they have things lined up to do. Plus a lot of relaxing.


message 19: by Sonja (new)

Sonja (illyria) Hi everyone - I'm Sonja from Australia. i recently feel in love with reading and shortly after happened to find this website =)


message 20: by Robin (new)

Robin (goodreadscomtriviagoddessl) Hi Sonja welcome to goodreads,


message 21: by Phair (new)

Phair (sphair) Didn't see a specific thread for introductions so I'll put mine here. I'm Sandy, a librarian for 40 years (as of this October). I love books and reading but have never enjoyed it more than I have since I started keeping written reading journals in 2002. I found I read more than ever now that I have concrete 'proof' of my progress and I love going back to re-read my reviews & comments. I discovered GoodReads last year so have been busily transcribing my journals as well as adding to my TBR list which, between GoodReads and the books I purchase for the library, is endless. Love the GR "shelf" concept which allows me to sort my books thematically.

My reading interests are broad but I tend to shy away from horror, crime & political thrillers and contemporary fiction. Faves are historical fiction & historical mysteries, post-apocalyptic/dystopian fiction and young adult fiction. I'll dabble in many areas if the book looks interesting. One area I particularly enjoy is books ABOUT books and reading (my shelf on the topic only includes titles since I began journal keeping: http://www.goodreads.com/review/list/... ) I particularly recommend How to Read Literature Like a Professor: A Lively and Entertaining Guide to Reading Between the Lines

Happy to be here!


message 22: by Robin (new)

Robin (goodreadscomtriviagoddessl) Hi Sandra welcome to our group


message 23: by JoAnn/QuAppelle (new)

JoAnn/QuAppelle | 1608 comments Mod
and we are happy you are here, Sandra.

Thanks for introducing yourself and hope you visit and post often.


message 24: by Robin (new)

Robin (goodreadscomtriviagoddessl) Yes, we are all a bunch of nice people.


message 25: by Dorota (new)

Dorota (readinggirl91) | 2 comments Hi Sandra. I am glad you are here. You seem like a person that can give us all a lot of good leads and interesting subjects. I am looking forward to hear from you often. Welcome.


message 26: by Suep (new)

Suep | 15 comments Welcome Sandra!


message 27: by Reeves (new)

Reeves Honey | 142 comments Hi Sandra:
I am going to send my daughter a college soph. the link for the book on reading English Lit.!
Thanks,
R.

currently reading Major Pettigrew's Last Stand


message 28: by Robin (new)

Robin (goodreadscomtriviagoddessl) Is he related to Miss Pettigrew, per chance?


message 29: by Reeves (new)

Reeves Honey | 142 comments Is that another brit book? ZI am not familiar with it. In the novel the major is a widower.


message 30: by Robin (last edited Sep 07, 2010 01:09PM) (new)

Robin (goodreadscomtriviagoddessl) It is a film that was made a few years ago, Miss Pettigrew Lives For A Day is the title, Frances McDormand plays her I believe. I couldn't resist .LOL


message 31: by JoAnn/QuAppelle (new)

JoAnn/QuAppelle | 1608 comments Mod
Robin wrote: "It is a film that was made a few years ago, Miss Pettigrew Lives For A Day is the title, Frances McDormand plays her I believe. I couldn't resist .LOL"

I could not help but think of this movie when I first saw the book title.

Amy Adams was also in the movie. She and McDormand were great in their roles.


message 32: by Robin (new)

Robin (goodreadscomtriviagoddessl) I never saw the movie as yet but I did get a lovely lavender shirt from my sister-in-law who does frequent the latest movies in her hometown, and it has emblazoned on the front, Miss Pettigrew Lives for A Day.


message 33: by Reeves (new)

Reeves Honey | 142 comments I have seen that movie but had a senior moment when I read your post! It really was a delightful movie.

As far as the book,Major Pettigrew's Last Stand by Helen Simonsen it is going to be my favorite book so far of 2010. Just like The Guernsey book when on the first few pages I felt the main character was just some silly English gal,upon further reading her depth and humor were revealed. It is the same with the characters in this book. They grow on you. The book gently makes fun of the snobbishness of the English upper middle class and treats it's racism in a real but unpreachy way. The major has many insightful,funny thoughts on these subjects that sometimes he speaks and sometimes not. I have actually laughed out loud at some of his observations. Top this off with a very nice love story about two mature people and it has made for a very good read. This would make a wonderful movie or Masterpiece Theater offering.


Donna in Southern Maryland (cedarville922) | 133 comments Mod
Welcome to all of our new posters! It's so neat that we have people who do not live just in the Continental US! GRs goes world-wide! Please introduce yourself and tell us a little about you and your reading favorites. We are friendly!

Donna in Southern Maryland


message 35: by cazdoll (new)

cazdoll | 1 comments hi my name is catherine im from ireland i love to read fiction books mostly romance but i love h.p twlight and anything with a good story line in it at the moment im enjoying virginia andrews Broken Wings (Broken Wings, #1) by V.C. Andrews


message 36: by JoAnn/QuAppelle (new)

JoAnn/QuAppelle | 1608 comments Mod
Welcome Catherine - where in Ireland do you live?

We were there three years ago and I cannot wait to return...


message 37: by Robin (new)

Robin (goodreadscomtriviagoddessl) Welcome Catherine


message 38: by Sandi (new)

Sandi (sandin954) | 211 comments I have not been able to finish a book in print this month mainly because I am trying to get all my work caught up since Saturday I am flying to San Francisco. The main reason I am going is to attend Bouchercon the annual convention for mysteries and thrillers. I have attended this convention a handful of times and always have fun. One of the best parts is meeting up with online pals and I also always enjoy the author panels. Since I have never been to California I also wanted to go out a few days early to do some sightseeing.


message 39: by JoAnn/QuAppelle (new)

JoAnn/QuAppelle | 1608 comments Mod
Sandi, what a great time you have ahead of you. San Francisco is a great city. Have fun!


message 40: by Shannon (new)

Shannon | 43 comments I'm headed to Portland Saturday morning for a great weekend at Wordstock, a celebration of all things bookish, including fun jewelry made of old typewriter keys. All sorts of authors across many genres will be reading, conducting workshops, and generally hanging out. On top of that, how could you beat the price? $10 for two days!

More at www.wordstockfestival.org


message 41: by JoAnn/QuAppelle (last edited Oct 08, 2010 08:55AM) (new)

JoAnn/QuAppelle | 1608 comments Mod
Shannon, this sounds wonderful. PLEASE come back and give us a full report!

Your link did not work so I googled it and got this one: http://www.wordstockfestival.com/


message 42: by Sandi (new)

Sandi (sandin954) | 211 comments Shannon wrote: "I'm headed to Portland Saturday morning for a great weekend at Wordstock, a celebration of all things bookish, including fun jewelry made of old typewriter keys. All sorts of authors across many ge..."

That looks like a great festival. I see one of my favorite authors Jess Walter is scheduled to read on Sunday.


message 43: by Schmerguls (new)

Schmerguls | 257 comments What I Read in October 30 years ago (1980)

1589 Hamilton Fish: The Inner History of the Grant Administration, by Allan Nevins (read 10 Oct 1980) (Pulitzer Biography prize for 1937) This good book tells the story of Hamilton Fish, who was born in lower Manhattan on Aug 3, 1808, and died Sept 7, 1893, at his summer home at Glenclyffe on the Hudson. He was U.S. Senator, Governor, and Grant's only Secretary of State. It is an interesting book and I now know more about the Alabama Claims than I ever expected to; also the San Domingo Treaty, and other things of which I had little knowledge--and not too much curiosity--before. Nevins lets his opinions show through blatantly--most noticeably when he characterizes something and then quotes the actual letter or document. His footnoting is the most haphazard I've ever seen in a serious work. (E.g., he has a footnote: "Congressional Globe" without a year--much less a page!) In his summation he says Fish kept us from acquiring Canada--and approves. I think it would be great if Canada were part of the U.S. We would really be a great, or at least a big, country then.

1590 The Hunt for the Czar, by Guy Richards (read 16 Oct 1980) This is a slipshod book, but it is a fascinating subject so I am glad I read the book. The thesis of this book is that the entire Romanov family escaped from Ekinterinberg! It is speculative, but the research is interesting. The book seriously contends the Tsarevich Alexei became a spy and defected to the West in 1962, being known as Michael Goleneuiski. I wish the book was more scholarly--but it is put together as a sensational story only. This book is a hodge-podge. Volume 29 of the National Cyclopedia of American Biography has a biography of William Rutledge McGarry--who supposedly wrote Rescuing the Czar, a rare book only six known copies of which exist. The 1926-27 Who's Who in America also has his biography and lists him as author of the book.

1591 Reunion and Reaction: The Compromise of 1877 and the End of Reconstruction, by C. Vann Woodward (read 19 Oct 1980) This is a little volume on the Hayes-Tilden disputed election. He shows that the South decided to go with Hayes in return for concessions by Hayes. Fascinating account, and well-written. I wonder if it is still recognized as authoritative.

1592 Stephen J. Field: Craftsman of the Law, by Carl Brent Swisher (read 25 Oct 1980) This is a 1930 book. Field was born 4 Nov 1816 at Haddam, Conn. He arrived in California on 28 Dec 1849. In 1857 he was elected to the California Supreme court. On Mar 10, 1863, he was confirmed as a Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court. He resigned effective Dec. 1, 1897, having served 34 years, 8 months and 20 days, the longest any man had served up to that time. I cannot admire him very much--he decided the result he wanted and then figured out how to get there. I believe that one should decide as the law dictates. Furthermore this biography doesn't tell us whether he was corrupt or not, but some things seem suspicious . The Terry business--which my knowledge of was heretofore confined to the note in a casebook about the case of In Re Neagle--was a fascinating story. William Sharon, a U.S. Senator from Nevada from Mar 4, 1875, to March 3, 1881, had a relationship with a woman who later claimed she was his wife. Terry, formerly on the California Supreme Court, married this creature, and the litigation and behavior of Mrs. Terry led eventually to Field's bodyguard, Neagle, shooting Terry. Unbelievable story. This book has no bibliography--I wonder if there is a good book on the matter.

1593 The Great Mutiny, by James Dugan (read 28 Oct 1980) (Book of the Year) This is a really great and memorable book. It tells completely and in chronological order the story of the mutiny in the British Navy in 1797. It is an almost unbelievable story, although the conditions existing in that navy were appalling. It is clear that freedom as we know it and as I believe it existed in the U.S. since the adoption of the Bill of Rights did not exist in Britain, but came by fits and starts. Not that I pretend the Bill of Rights had much to do with military and naval discipline in the U.S.--but this book covers a lot more ;than the mutiny. My only objection is that the book is so short on footnotes one wonders if the author may not have just made a lot up--else the research necessary seems like the job of a lifetime. The first part of the mutiny--at Portsmouth and Spithead--was met with surprising docility. But when it was settled the Nore mutiny began--the instigators of it were more demanding--and the opposition adamant. Really a great and interesting book--well worth the 35 cents I paid for it. A great new title in my reading on naval history.






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message 44: by JoAnn/QuAppelle (new)

JoAnn/QuAppelle | 1608 comments Mod
Confession of a Used Book Salesman ---

http://www.slate.com/id/2268000/pagen...

This sounds like hard work to me!


message 45: by Sandi (new)

Sandi (sandin954) | 211 comments JoAnn/QuAppelle wrote: "Confession of a Used Book Salesman ---

http://www.slate.com/id/2268000/pagen...

This sounds like hard work to me!"


Interesting article. I agree, working eighty hours a week does not sound like much fun. I remember years ago after reading the first Cliff Janeway mystery, about a former cop turned rare book dealer, Booked to Die by John Dunning that I thought being a book scout would be a fun way to pick up some extra cash. Of course, that was before all the new scanners and apps and the scouts actually had to really know about the books and the market.

I arrived home today after nine days in San Francisco. Had a great time though I am glad to be home.


message 46: by JoAnn/QuAppelle (new)

JoAnn/QuAppelle | 1608 comments Mod
So, Sandi, what did you do while in San Francisco?


message 47: by Sandi (new)

Sandi (sandin954) | 211 comments JoAnn/QuAppelle wrote: "So, Sandi, what did you do while in San Francisco?"

For the first four days I was able to do most of the major tourist spots Fisherman's Wharf, the Embarcadero, Coit Tower, The Golden Gate Bridge, North Beach, Chinatown, Japantown, Nob Hill, Union Square and rode the Cable Cars. I do hope to go back because while I got to see quite a bit of the city by riding the public transportation I was unable to hit any museums and did not make it out to Berkley or Oakland.

I did get to go to the famous City Lights Books and purchased a short story collection
Damn Near Dead: An Anthology of Geezer Noir so I could have some of the authors at Bouchercon sign their stories. I was able to get the signatures of Duane Swierczynski, Robert Ward, Jason Starr, Megan Abbott, Mark Billingham, and Steve Brewer while at the conference.


message 48: by JoAnn/QuAppelle (last edited Oct 23, 2010 03:01PM) (new)

JoAnn/QuAppelle | 1608 comments Mod
Sounds like you did a lot, Sandi....what a good time.

We rented a car when we were there and were able to go to Napa Valley and Sausalito, both places which I loved.

I love the term "geezer lit"!


Sherry (sethurner) (sthurner) I just got home from the Edgerton Book and Film Festival. The town is nearby, about 3,000 people, but they had Chris Van Allsburg, Jane Hamilton, and a bunch of good regional authors like Michael Perry. Van Allsburg arrived by antique steam train (very cool in itself) then spent hours signing copies of The Polar Express. I skipped that part. But it was all free, and a good time was had by all.
Chris Van Allsburg
Jane Hamilton
Michael Perry


message 50: by JoAnn/QuAppelle (new)

JoAnn/QuAppelle | 1608 comments Mod
Does the steam train run on a regular basis, Sherry? What fun!


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