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Discussions Past 2010 > Frankenstein

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message 1: by Nicole (new)

Nicole Cavallaro (ncavallaro) | 23 comments Mod
Frankenstein by Mary Shelley

Let's enjoy a classic of the horror genre to get us in the mood for my favorite holiday!


message 2: by Nicole (new)

Nicole Cavallaro (ncavallaro) | 23 comments Mod
I posted the link to the Spark notes site on the email I sent out, but for anyone else interested in the brief version, here it is.
http://www.sparknotes.com/lit/franken...

Also, if you are interested in reading up about the authors life and works check out this link from one of our Biography Resources at the library.

http://0-ic.galegroup.com.iii.ocls.in...

If your looking for any more resources feel free to post or to ask for some. :)


message 3: by Nicole (new)

Nicole Cavallaro (ncavallaro) | 23 comments Mod
Can't help but plug the library here, we now have the entire Gutenberg project collection available for free download through Overdrive! What does that mean for you, well, it means that books like Frankenstein are available for download through Overdrive and the library. Check out this link and call if you have any questions!

http://ocls.lib.overdrive.com/6570AB5...


message 4: by Nicole (new)

Nicole Cavallaro (ncavallaro) | 23 comments Mod
Talking to Courtney last night and it is always so surprising to me that so little in the book has to do with the creation of the monster. And yet, what we remember from Hollywood is the dramatic creation scene. If this is the first time you have read Frankenstein, you might feel that let down when you realize that you went from nothing to monster creation in the space of a paragraph! What do you think?


message 5: by Nicole (new)

Nicole Cavallaro (ncavallaro) | 23 comments Mod
Here is a preview of some of the questions we will have on hand for the discussion. With text this meaty, one has to have a little bit of guidance! Also, at the end you will find another great site for summary of the book.

-Why did Victor create the creature? What responsibilities did Victor, as the creator, have toward his creature? Why did Victor abandon the creature?

-One of the novel's tragedies is the inability of characters to recognize the humanity of the creature. What qualities make us human? Which of these qualities does the creature possess? What qualities does he not have?

-Explain the novel's popularity. What makes the novel a classic? How is the story appropriate for today and our society?

1. Victor doesn’t give his monster a name. What does this do for the story? What does it say about us in society today that we think the monster’s name is Frankenstein (besides the fact that we are apparently ill-read)?

2. How is science portrayed in Frankenstein? Consider that this book was written in the midst of vast scientific advances and the advent of the Industrial Revolution.

3. How would this novel be different if the characters could let go of their need for revenge?

4. You might have noticed some Christian influences in this text. To start off, there’s the creator/creation paradigm. And, of course, the monster is compared to Adam. But the monster is also compared to the fallen angel – Satan – and Victor takes on comparisons to God. You could even go so far as to call Victor’s death a sacrifice that makes him a Christ figure. Do the book’s Christian influences force characters to be either good or evil? What might Shelley be saying about this?

5. Victor does not trust the monster; supposedly, that’s why he breaks his promise to create him a companion. Is the monster trustworthy? Can Victory be trustworthy even though he broke his promise?

6. We’ve identified two major themes. The first is the fear of science. The second is that ugly people get the shaft. The question is, are these related? Do they compliment each other in any way? Why might Shelley have chosen to explore both these topics in the same novel? Or was she just killing two birds with one stone?

http://www.shmoop.com/frankenstein/


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