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Face Off! (Less Serious) > city mouse or country mouse?

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message 1: by Cynthia (new)

Cynthia Paschen | 7085 comments I'm wondering: Have you made a clear choice as to your ideal residence? Do you prefer the big city or the small, rural location. I have gone back and forth on this one. Right now, I live in a college town, the college kids are just moving back in and my own two college kids are moving back to their own schools. Sometimes I think I am ready for the peace and solitude of watching the sunset without listening to frat parties. What do you all think?


message 2: by Carol (new)

Carol | 1679 comments I work at the college in town but live in a rural area. For me, living where I can watch the sunset and visiting the city life is perfect for me.


message 3: by Paul (new)

Paul  Perry (pezski) | 79 comments I think I have it just about ideal. I live in the suburbs of Sheffield, a city of something over half a million people, but right on the edge of the Peak District National Park. In half an hour or so on the push bike I can be here http://www.flickr.com/photos/pezter/3...

Sheffield has enough for me - a great multiplex cinema and a great indy, two good theatres, plenty of concert venues - and is well placed to get to Manchester, Leeds, Nottingham, Lincoln. I often pass houses that are right out in the sticks and think "if only!" but i reckon i'd miss being so close to the city.


Jackie "the Librarian" | 8993 comments Not rural, but not a big city for me, either. I don't like too much hustle and bustle, but I like having shops and stuff within walking distance, and I like emergency services close by.

Right now, the street I'm living on is a little busier than I really like, to my surprise. I'm only a few blocks from both the police and the fire stations, and they tend to turn on their sirens as they pass my apartment building as they head to the traffic light a few blocks down the road.


message 5: by Cynthia (new)

Cynthia Paschen | 7085 comments Carol wrote: "I work at the college in town but live in a rural area. For me, living where I can watch the sunset and visiting the city life is perfect for me."
Sounds like an ideal combination, Carol!


message 6: by Cynthia (new)

Cynthia Paschen | 7085 comments Jackie "the Librarian" wrote: "Not rural, but not a big city for me, either. I don't like too much hustle and bustle, but I like having shops and stuff within walking distance, and I like emergency services close by.

Right no..."


Sirens do kind of suck. The alternative though, in our case is that certain towns in our county are serviced (infrequently) by the county sheriff, but have no police force of their own. Thus, the whole meth lab problem in Iowa.


message 7: by [deleted user] (new)

What do you consider big city? I don't consider Madison a big city for reference.


message 8: by Cynthia (new)

Cynthia Paschen | 7085 comments Jim "In dreams we enter a world entirely our own" wrote: "What do you consider big city? I don't consider Madison a big city for reference."

I'd call Minneapolis a big city. Madison Medium?


message 9: by Cynthia (new)

Cynthia Paschen | 7085 comments Barb wrote: "I don't really like large cities very much. I don't mind visiting Toronto every now and then, but I sure as shit wouldn't want to live there. It's not just the size of the city, but the region in..."

Barb, I think BEAUTY is key.


message 10: by Jonathan (new)

Jonathan Lopez | 4728 comments New York is home for me, so it's what I'm used to, and I generally like it. But I do enjoy getting out into the country for vacations. There's a lot to be said for fresh air and silence.


message 11: by Cynthia (new)

Cynthia Paschen | 7085 comments And the sky! That's what I HATE in the city--no stars, no shooting stars, no planets, no big dipper.


message 12: by Jonathan (new)

Jonathan Lopez | 4728 comments Yes. There's a lot of light pollution in the city. It's nice to be someplace dark enough to see the Milky Way.


message 13: by Lobstergirl, el principe (new)

Lobstergirl | 24150 comments Mod
I guess I'm one of those odd people who can be happy in a dense urban area, or a remote wilderness. I think I might feel dead in the suburbs, though. Depending on the type of suburb perhaps. There is something about the energy of a big bustling city that I've always liked. I don't think small town life would suit me unless it was within 1/2 hour by car, or 1 hour by train from a large city. Small towns have their charms but I wouldn't want to be stuck there without a way out.


message 14: by Carol (new)

Carol | 1679 comments I'm on the outskirts of a very small city, which is a suburb of a smallish city. I could drive to NYC or Boston for a day trip though (a long day) According to census info, there are 125 people per square mile in the county. That's rural.


message 15: by Félix (last edited Aug 22, 2010 08:24AM) (new)

Félix (habitseven) I reside in an urban setting, and mostly enjoy it. It's the first time I've done that since I was about 21.

Some things (see my latest post pertaining to the motorcycles outside my window) get on my nerves.

I truly love the country, though. Quiet nights with just the hoot of owls to break the silence. The smell of the forest and field. ::sigh::


message 16: by [deleted user] (new)

Country mouse within a half hours drive of a small to medium city.


message 17: by Cynthia (new)

Cynthia Paschen | 7085 comments Jim do you buy your groceries in the country? DO you have a nice local hardware store? Can you get a haircut near home?

These are the things that worry me a bit about a possible move to the country. Twenty-five minutes is not far to drive, but do I want to make that drive every day?


message 18: by Félix (last edited Aug 22, 2010 08:29AM) (new)

Félix (habitseven) The biggest plus for living in the city is not having to drive as much as I did when residing in the suburbs. A tank of gas often lasts me two months.


message 19: by Cynthia (new)

Cynthia Paschen | 7085 comments Exactly. When we lived in Minneapolis and I worked in St. Paul, I drove everywhere. The only places I could walk to were Catholic Churches and taverns.


message 20: by Jonathan (last edited Aug 22, 2010 08:46AM) (new)

Jonathan Lopez | 4728 comments String a few together at random, and that could be a pretty interesting walk, Cynthia!

I also find that being able to walk or take the subway wherever I need to go is a big plus. But keeping a car in New York is so expensive and inconvenient that a car really isn't an option for me.


message 21: by Cynthia (new)

Cynthia Paschen | 7085 comments It was an interesting neighborhood Johnathan. Mostly blue-collar Polish Catholics who liked their beer.


message 22: by Carol (new)

Carol | 1679 comments What I cannot understand is living in the country (a 10 minute drive to buy milk) and living on a busy route. That defeats a major plus to country living. My road is 3 miles long, so it's residents of this road that use it. If I see two cars at the four-way stop, I say "what's with all the traffic?"


message 23: by Mary (new)

Mary (madamefifi) I'm a city mouse living in the country.


message 24: by ms.petra (new)

ms.petra (mspetra) I have always lived in a city. I think of Denver as medium sized. I like that I have so many options here. I can go to movies, museums, sporting events, or the mountains. I am a homebody, so I like working in my garden and just hanging out at home, but I like knowing I have it all available to me if I want it. Denver has a lot of bike/walking trails. I hate commuting so I live about 5 miles from my job and can ride my bike in if I feel like it. The people here are friendly. The political climate is mixed and fairly tolerant. The more I travel around, the more I like Denver. I haven't really visited the upper midwest, but I imagine the cities would be similar to Kansas City where I have family and have spent a lot of time. I love visiting NYC, but don't particularly like Chicago. I also liked Seattle, although I haven't spent much time in the Northwest.


message 25: by Carol (new)

Carol | 1679 comments Living in the country leads to driving long distances and not thinking much of it. My hair stylist moved from 30 minutes away to over an hour away. Now I am finding restaurants and other things to do near there. Also 25 miles = 30 minutes, no traffic slowdowns!


message 26: by Cynthia (new)

Cynthia Paschen | 7085 comments I suppose you tend to do errands in one fell swoop, lumping several stops into one trip.


message 27: by [deleted user] (new)

Cynthia wrote: "Jim do you buy your groceries in the country? DO you have a nice local hardware store? Can you get a haircut near home?

These are the things that worry me a bit about a possible move to the countr..."


I am probably no more than 10 minutes away from a grocery store in any direction that I would go, and a good hardware store in three out of the 4 directions, and I get a hair cut in my kitchen, although my wife does go into Madison to get hers done. We both work in Madison, just live in the country about 15 minutes away. I could live farther away, and may as soon as my son graduates high school.


message 28: by [deleted user] (new)

We will run errands on the way home from work. Our son goes to school in a city that is surrounded by Madison, it is a cooperative of a village in the country, and a village in the city. It is a pretty unique situation, and I work about 5 minutes from his school and 3 minutes from my wifes work. My wife and I car pool about 95% of the time, and my son is getting into a car pool with a couple of girls from near us that are managers for the football team so they will start school, and be done with practice at the same time, and will save money. He can always take the bus as a back up, but after a certain age any alternative seems better than the bus I guess.


message 29: by Cynthia (new)

Cynthia Paschen | 7085 comments Jim: Oh yeah, the bus. When my oldest was a high school sophomore she called it the "drug Bus" as someone was always smoking or dealing weed.

Do you think driving in the country is more or less dangerous for your teenager? I think my teenager is going to get lost either way.


message 30: by Jonathan (last edited Aug 22, 2010 10:41AM) (new)

Jonathan Lopez | 4728 comments Cynthia wrote: "When my oldest was a high school sophomore she called it the "drug Bus" as someone was always smoking or dealing weed..."

Yikes. The image I have in my head of Iowa--never having been--is of a very wholesome, hardworking place out of a Grant Wood painting. I guess that's naive.

(Or maybe that's Kansas...)


message 31: by [deleted user] (new)

During the day country driving will be easier, I'm not a big fan of kids driving in the country at night. Our kids get a GDL(Graduated Drivers License) and can only have 1 non related person in the vehicle with them to start out. This is to keep the driver from being distracted. After so long you can add another passenger, then after so long only car capacity is the limit. He broke that law on the very first day, and the second. The good news for him is he is a very good driver, and looks 18 already.


message 32: by ms.petra (new)

ms.petra (mspetra) My daughter is finishing up her first week at KU and she says it is PARTY CENTRAL. A lot of country kids with nothing else to do but party. I hadn't really thought about that and neither had she, so it is tough going for a kid who is not really into it. What do country kids do for fun?


message 33: by Cynthia (new)

Cynthia Paschen | 7085 comments Jonathan wrote: "Cynthia wrote: "When my oldest was a high school sophomore she called it the "drug Bus" as someone was always smoking or dealing weed..."

Yikes. The image I have in my head of Iowa--never having b..."


We were the meth-cooking capital of the world. The legislature worked to start restricting the sale of over-the-counter allergy meds, etc. (used to make meth) so now they're finding fewer labs.

The University of Iowa, like KU Ms. Petra, is party central too.


message 34: by Cynthia (new)

Cynthia Paschen | 7085 comments ms.petra wrote: "My daughter is finishing up her first week at KU and she says it is PARTY CENTRAL. A lot of country kids with nothing else to do but party. I hadn't really thought about that and neither had she, s..."

The U of Iowa is trying to put the kibosh on its party school image this year. They convinced the city council that 18-year-olds no longer belong in the Iowa City bars. They have to be 21 to drink, but up until this summer, the 18-year-olds could be in the bars "to socialize."

Then this fall, the school announced new restrictions on tailgating, limiting the number of hours after Iowa City football games when sports fans are allowed to sit outdoors and drink.


message 35: by ms.petra (new)

ms.petra (mspetra) The dorms required the kids to do an online alcohol counseling thing and then she said today there were posters up for a party monday nite on her floor advertising jello shots and such. She says to me "mom, I have chem and calc on Tuesday morning." I think they should offer a non-drinking dorm to kids. There seems to be a lot more peer pressure.


message 36: by RandomAnthony (new)

RandomAnthony | 14536 comments I grew up in Chicago and left at about 27. I'm glad we left. I'm about a half hour away from Milwaukee. I wish we had better public trans...driving is a necessity here. I don't miss the city. The tradeoff, I guess, works for me. In other words, I don't worry much about crime, schools, parking, traffic, etc. Even little things, like short lines at the supermarket, work for me, as well as the proximity to nature. The negative, I guess, is the need to drive to museums, etc. But that's ok with me. I think I said this once in another ancient thread, but in the age of the internet, where I could have just about any product on my front doorstep in a few days, living out of the city is a lot easier than even ten years back.


message 37: by Cynthia (new)

Cynthia Paschen | 7085 comments Agreed, RA, You can order it online if you need it. I am a little concerned at the prospect of no home delivery of the Sunday New York Times. Guess I could drive to the Casey's and find one?


message 38: by Cynthia (new)

Cynthia Paschen | 7085 comments ms.petra wrote: "The dorms required the kids to do an online alcohol counseling thing and then she said today there were posters up for a party monday nite on her floor advertising jello shots and such. She says to..."
They don't have alcohol-free dorm floors? I am pretty sure Iowa State still does.


message 39: by ms.petra (new)

ms.petra (mspetra) Cynthia wrote: "ms.petra wrote: "The dorms required the kids to do an online alcohol counseling thing and then she said today there were posters up for a party monday nite on her floor advertising jello shots and ..."

I'm sure they are supposed to be all alcohol free and she said the poster was down later today. I think some kids are just so into it and they are there for drinking and partying. I think the actual first week or two of freedom might be the craziest because classes haven't really kicked in and the reality of school will soon calm things down. Can you imagine as a parent saying "honey do you want to be in a drinking dorm, a pot dorm, sex dorm, etc?! I am sure the school doesn't condone any of this, but the teens will be testing the limits. It will all work out I'm sure.


message 40: by Kevin (new)

Kevin  (ksprink) | 11469 comments i live in the country. i like the freedom to pee outside, burn stuff and occasionally shoot off a black powder rifle in the air for no reason at all. i realize you can do this in town but out here no one bats an eye and the po-po doesn't roll up. on the down side, they do not deliver pizza out here


message 41: by Lobstergirl, el principe (new)

Lobstergirl | 24150 comments Mod
People pee outside in the city too.

:(


message 42: by Félix (new)

Félix (habitseven) Lobstergirl wrote: "People pee outside in the city too.

:("


It's true.


Stacia (the 2010 club) (stacia_r) I don't consider living in a tract home in the suburbs as either city or country. It's closer to city living than country I'd guess...


message 44: by [deleted user] (new)

I would like to redefine that to "Men pee outside in the city."


message 45: by Jonathan (last edited Aug 22, 2010 08:18PM) (new)

Jonathan Lopez | 4728 comments Not all of us. Honest. It's just an urban legend.


message 46: by Lobstergirl, el principe (new)

Lobstergirl | 24150 comments Mod
I don't usually see the perps in the act, I just smell it afterward. So I can't say what genders are doing it.


message 47: by Jonathan (new)

Jonathan Lopez | 4728 comments Speaking of urban legends, the one about alligators living in the New York City sewer system is now apparently true:

http://www.nypost.com/p/news/local/qu...


message 48: by Lobstergirl, el principe (new)

Lobstergirl | 24150 comments Mod
Just as long as the part about them coming up the pipes into the toilet remains an urban legend...


message 49: by Jonathan (new)

Jonathan Lopez | 4728 comments I'm clamping my toilet lid shut as soon as I can dig out a good sized bar clamp. Can't be too careful.


message 50: by Paul (new)

Paul  Perry (pezski) | 79 comments Jonathan wrote: "Speaking of urban legends, the one about alligators living in the New York City sewer system is now apparently true:

http://www.nypost.com/p/news/local/qu......"


it was chased out by four turtles in bandannas...


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