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message 1: by Mandapanda (new)

Mandapanda ABC Radio National broadcasts book readings Mondays to Fridays at 2pm (repeated at 11pm). Here is what they say about their program: The Book Reading presents the best of classic and contemporary fiction by Australian and world writers, read by some of Australia's finest actors. It has been broadcast on ABC Radio since 1948. Most contemporary and classic Australian fiction broadcast in The Book Reading is available from The ABC Shop and ABC centres.

Do any of you listen to this program? I didn't know it existed until today. Follow this link to their website. Click here to find your local radio frequency or click here to listen online. Want to know more about Digital Radio, follow this link.
Happy listening!


message 2: by Jacqueline (new)

Jacqueline George (jacquelinegeorge) Yes, they took 15 minutes off Lucky Ocean's world music spot and that means we get two readings a day (with the Book Show in the morning).

I find the reading on the Book Show is often the best bit of the show - I find the rest is a bit snooty and pretentious sometimes.


message 3: by Mandapanda (last edited Sep 13, 2010 09:07PM) (new)

Mandapanda Just thought I'd put in some interesting comments posted by another AR member, Laurel, in the FTBC thread.

Pam wrote: "I am new to this bookgroup, but l will start it off by stating, I do not like Tuesday Night Book Group AT ALL,Geeeeez they are always trying to outdo each other and they all (given that l have watc..."

Pam - If you are able listen to Life Matters weekdays, 9am,on Radio National, sometimes they interview authors and their books - Geoff Pike who wrote Red Lotus was on today talking about his book, his life and other things. Then there is Books 10am with Ramona Koval and then at 11am, Bush Telegraph - they occasionally interview authors and their books. Last month they had A Town Like Alice on as their book of the month. It wasn't only about the book - they had guests as well - an historian who gave his thoughts to how exact Neville Shute was in the history of the war. Another guest was the woman mayor of the small NT town which they said NS modelled his Town like Alice on. Laurel


message 4: by Jacqueline (last edited Sep 13, 2010 09:36PM) (new)

Jacqueline George (jacquelinegeorge) Life Matters is not bad. I managed a spot on that about 18 months ago. Ramona Koval's show is not for ordinary mortals. They only do LITERATURE, and I think they work on the principle that for a book to be literature, it needs to be nearly incomprehensible. And if it is foreign as well, that is even better.

Happy endings are out, death and slow dying are delightful, navel gazing is a competitive sport. (Thank God the authors are short-sighted, or I can't imagine what they would be gazing at.)

As far as I am concerned, some days I wish they would sit on their ivory tower, and I mean on.


message 5: by Mandapanda (new)

Mandapanda Jacqueline wrote: "Life Matters is not bad. I managed a spot on that about 18 months ago. Ramona Koval's show is not for ordinary mortals. They only do LITERATURE, and I think they work on the principle that for a..."

Jacqueline, Don't Hold Back! LOL. I'm going to have to listen to it now that you've put your 10c worth in. I'll get back to you next week with my opinions!!


message 6: by Laurel (new)

Laurel Lamperd Jacqueline wrote: "Life Matters is not bad. I managed a spot on that about 18 months ago. Ramona Koval's show is not for ordinary mortals. They only do LITERATURE, and I think they work on the principle that for a..."

Yes, I guess Ramona Koval's program is a bit top heavy at times. I work at my writing in the morning and only listen to what interests me. This morning on Life Matters, Richard Aedy interviewed the Oz writer, Sonya Hartnell about her new YA book, Midnight Zoo, which I found interesting. Laurel


message 7: by Mandapanda (new)

Mandapanda If you're sick of all the hype of ebooks and ereaders, here's a great interview on the Bookshow on ABC Radio National:

THE WORLD OF THE RARE BOOKSELLER

Even though we're in the middle of a digital publishing revolution that's turning the real into virtual, Nicholas Pounder and Rick Gekoski are two men buried in the world of rare books and book related memorabilia. They both admit they're obsessed with second hand shops in quiet country towns; who knows what they might turn up, a first edition, a lost manuscript or even George Orwell's pen.

Nicholas Pounder does use the virutal world though. He runs his Rare Book shop by internet and mail order in Sydney. American born Rick Gekoski is based in London, he's a writer and former English lecturer.

In Sydney for the 2010 Sydney Writer's Festival, they offered this peek into the not so rarified world of the antique book seller.

http://www.abc.net.au/rn/bookshow/sto...


message 8: by Laurel (new)

Laurel Lamperd Mandy wrote: "If you're sick of all the hype of ebooks and ereaders, here's a great interview on the Bookshow on ABC Radio National:

THE WORLD OF THE RARE BOOKSELLER

Even though we're in the middle of a di..."


I heard this yesterday too, Mandy. What they would pay for one book, if you happened to have it in your library, was amazing. I guess that's why I enjoyed AB Byatt's [have I the initials right] Possession so much. Ramona does have some interesting people and others not so [to me] I guess she tries to cater for many interests. Laurel


message 9: by Mandapanda (new)

Mandapanda Sydney's ABC radio station has been running a hilarious segment called 'Wrecked Titles' where listeners are invited to ring up and suggest an alternative title for a literary classic by adding or altering one letter. Notable entries include:
Far From The Madding Crowe - A hotel assistant recounts his epic journey to escape from an enraged A-list actor
Pide and Prejudice - The tale of a Turkish immigrant's struggle to establish a takeaway shop in 1960's Australia
The Complete Woks Of Shakespeare - Themed cookbooks are so in vogue at the moment
For The Perm Of His Natural Life - For anyone who has ever made a bad decision at the hairdresser
The Last Mango In Paris
The Fridges of Madison County
Angela's Pashes


Read more here: Wrecked Titles

(From the Nov. issue of Bookseller & Publisher)


message 10: by Mandapanda (new)

Mandapanda The Bookshow on ABC Radio National is having an interesting discussion this Friday 28th about books on writers' letters.

Writers’ letters

"January is a quiet time in publishing. It’s not for the Book Show. We’ve just returned from summer break to piles of books on our desks. The piles concealed my computer so much, I had to open them before turning it on. Now we sift through the books in search of stories for the show.

There are many books on writers’ letters that have just been published, Saul Bellow’s, Bruce Chatwin’s, Guiseppe Tomasi Lampedusa’s are just a few. So we thought it would be a good idea to speak to the editors of some literary figures’ collected letters. This Friday we have Benjamin Taylor on Saul Bellow (author of Herzog), Blake Gilpin on the unpublished letters of William Styron (Sophie’s Choice) and Jill Roe, historian and Miles Franklin biographer on her letters, or ‘congenials’, which were republished last year for a new generation of readers. Writers letters are curious artefacts because they suggest a direct link to the inner world of the writer but they can also be as much a writerly performance as the official ‘literary’ output. The first letters in the Bellow and Franklin collections are an indication of their talent as writers. Bellow is breaking up with a girl Yetta, and he keeps repeating her name, Yetta this…Yetta that…. He says I am thinking, thinking Yetta, drifting with night, with infinity, and all my thoughts are of you. But my thoughts of you are not altogether kind, they sting, they lash. Here he’s 17 and it’s obvious he’s displaying his writerly prowess. Then the first letter in Franklin’s collection was written when she was 7. She writes to her auntie How is your pet lamb getting on I expect he has a fleece of wool fit to cut now and how is the magpie getting on I expect he is able to sing and whistle well. You can sense Franklin’s natural curiosity and intellect through this one line. But what about William Styron’s first letter? We haven’t seen that as the collected letters won’t be published until 2012 but the editor Blake Gilpin will tell us all about working with Styron’s widow Rose and how he’s selecting the epistles for publication.

What of the future of letter writing collections? While Elizabeth Chatwin, widow of Bruce Chatwin whose letters have just been published, says Bruce’s letters, starting from a very young age and continuing through life, are a last example of a traditional form of communication which may now disappear. It’s possible that literary archives won’t suffer from the advent of twitter, email and facebook and that these will most likely be new repositories for the eager biographer."

If you're interested in listening or downloading this or any episode of the Bookshow click here.


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