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Writer's Workshop: Prompt #1

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message 1: by Paul (new)

Paul Kagebein | 3 comments Paul's "Given" First Line

Begin your story with the first line already given, in this case chosen by me: "Do not mistake fate for coincidence".

Write about what you ask? Just start writing, as long it starts out with the above line. It doesn't have to be used as dialogue, and you can pretend that you're starting in the middle of an already developed story. You're basically writing one or two or three fiction paragraphs. Treat them as excerpts from a larger story, or minute standalone short stories. 'Tis your choice.

Maybe at a later time, I'll choose someone else to choose the line for the same prompt. This is our first assignment, so keep it small (maximum 1000 words).

I'll let you know when MINE is done, but feel free to share yours at any point.


message 2: by Belinda (new)

Belinda Jonak | 1 comments Paul wrote: "Paul's "Given" First Line

Begin your story with the first line already given, in this case chosen by me: "Do not mistake fate for coincidence".

Write about what you ask? Just start writing, ..."


If you're going to use this as a theme for an original story or screenplay, you might want to consider the many ways it has already been done. I mean the Terminator movies have almost done it to death..."There is no fate but what we make." Movies and TV keep making and remaking what's fate and what's random chance. Introducing the time travel element allows for lots of plot twists and crazy characters, but "terrible things happen to wizards (writers)that tamper with time." A story wrapped in a time loop may get hung in the infinite worlds of maybe. There are theories out the wazoo that pit predestination againist coincidence. "Do we each have a destiny? Or are we just floating around accidental-like on a breeze?" In the world according to Forrest Gump, both things are happening simultaneously. The pragmatist says trying to pin down exact mechanisms is mental masturbation-entertaining but ultimately unproductive. Without precognition or time travel as practical applications of "real" life, everything hinges on stuff we can't (yet) control and individual choice. Everyone plays the game of life with varying degrees of luck and skill. Life ain't fair, but we can make up rules that help level the playing field. We humans try to find patterns in chaos and randomness, but the meaning of life might just as well be 42 (Douglas Adams). We all write our own stories, whether we choose to record them or keep them in our heads. Sharing them with others for fun or profit seems as meaningful a reason to be as any other humans have come up with.


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