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Buddy Reads > Six Wives: The Queens of Henry VIII - David Starkey

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message 1: by britt ✨ (new)

britt ✨ (britteeebee) | 19 comments So I just started reading this book by David Starkey and I was wondering if anyone is interested in reading it as well? I am interested in gaining as much knowledge about the wives of Henry VIII as I can. My next reads are going to be the books about the Six Wives by Antonia Fraser and Alison Weir, but I haven't acquired those yet so I'm starting with Starkey's.

Anyone interested? Interesting discussion is hoped for, as well as information on more resources regarding the Six Wives (ex. websites, books, etc.)

:)


message 2: by Aly (new)

Aly (Alygator) | 854 comments Brittney, this is actually my least favorite of the Six Wives books, but I hope you enjoy it!!! I'm torn between Fraser's and Weir's as being my favorite one.


message 3: by britt ✨ (new)

britt ✨ (britteeebee) | 19 comments Lol well I am enjoying it so far but I'm only like 20 pages in. I'll let you know what I think when I'm done.

Alison Weir's is the next one on my list. I just bought it today :) can't wait to start it when I'm done this one!


message 4: by Jennifer, Mod #5 (new)

Jennifer (jennifertudor) | 951 comments Brittany, Kate and I are doing a BR for either Fraser's or Weir's. Feel free to join in when we figure out which one :)


message 5: by britt ✨ (new)

britt ✨ (britteeebee) | 19 comments Thanks Jennifer! I just got Alison Weir's so I'd probably go with that one. But let me know what you decide. I'm going to continue with Starkey's until I hear from you.

I might end up reading both at the same time ;) lol


message 6: by Marylou (new)

Marylou (loulu) | 164 comments Starkey's was the first book I read about the six wives and I liked it.


message 7: by britt ✨ (new)

britt ✨ (britteeebee) | 19 comments It's good so far, although it's very in depth about a bunch of people involved in Catherine's journey to England which I find quite unnecessary. But other than that I find it very interesting so far :)


message 8: by Kara (new)

Kara (karasmannequin) | 21 comments This was also the first book I read about all six wives in detail and I enjoyed it. :D


message 9: by Gregory (new)

Gregory House (greghouse) | 122 comments Having read the other two books I found this one to be the most accurate in cutting past the poor research or sloppy partisain accounts. I started very skeptical with Starkey, but was soon extremely impressed. If he has proof for an alternate view he backs it up rather than repeating rumour or innuendo. Where direct information is lacking he mentions what may have happened but presents it as his opinion based on his reading of the evidence not historical fact.


message 10: by Naomi V (new)

Naomi V (naomi_v) i just started this and i'm enjoying it. i like that Starkey explains the differences in what he's presenting and what's been in previously published accounts. at the same time, his writing is very readable and interesting.


message 11: by Gregory (new)

Gregory House (greghouse) | 122 comments Starkey's virtous prince was very average and i did get very annoyed at his frequent prctice of dropping hints then sudden evasion without showing the evidence. As I said in another postI did approach this book with grim foreboding expecting the worst. Now it is the standard by which other Tudor histories are judged.


message 12: by Marylou (new)

Marylou (loulu) | 164 comments I read Starkey, Weir, and Fraser and enjoyed all of them about Henry young and nice and Henry mean and probably crazy (at least irasable.


message 13: by Barbara (new)

Barbara | 1 comments I have only read Weir, but I do have Starkey and are looking forward to reading him ever since I saw 10 episodes of his documentary series Monarchy. I have several books by him that I bought in the Tower last year. I didn't know Fraser wrote one as well. I am going to look for that one. I must say I enjoyed reading Weir. I have read several of her books and I do like her style of writing. Most often historical books are a bit dry to read and her style isn't.


message 14: by Gregory (new)

Gregory House (greghouse) | 122 comments As I soon found Weir is all right to start off with though to be honest I soon got very tired of her deep loathing of Ann Boleyn and sloppy use of sources. Starkey's six wives isn't dry I've almost finished and found it very enlightening without having to wade througth miles of academic speak. If after that your feeling really bold try Scarisbrick's Henry lots of good information however he does get very obsessed with minute canon law detail regarding the annulment.


message 15: by Jennifer, Mod #5 (new)

Jennifer (jennifertudor) | 951 comments Greg wrote: "try Scarisbrick's Henry"

I'm pretty sure I own this one but it looks (totally judging a book by its cover) like it would be really dry. Did you find it to be?


message 16: by Gregory (new)

Gregory House (greghouse) | 122 comments Ahh I'm afraid so, extremely academic. However I read it in short sections between lots of other tudor books. I found it backed up at lot of the statements made by reputable historians. Of them all I have found Starkeys the most well rounded and that's impressive since I loathed his Henry: Virtuous Prince regarding it as sloppy and evasive.


message 17: by Jennifer, Mod #5 (new)

Jennifer (jennifertudor) | 951 comments I'll have to keep that in mind. I have so many books like that one, that I know will most likely be really good but that are going to be difficult to get through. I haven't read anything by Starkey yet but people are so all over the place on him! Either love him or can't stand him, I guess?


message 18: by Gregory (new)

Gregory House (greghouse) | 122 comments The Virtuous Prince did have a lot of good sections. it was just that I had to grit my teeth or groan with frustration in the middling evasive bits. Loades has a reasonable reputation and writes reasonably well as does Derek Wilson. If you want really dry and academeic but brillant GR Elton beats them all.


message 19: by Jennifer, Mod #5 (new)

Jennifer (jennifertudor) | 951 comments I've never heard of Elton, thanks! All of his books or do you recommend any in particular?


message 20: by Gregory (new)

Gregory House (greghouse) | 122 comments GR Elton is considered the father of modern Tudor history he taught Scarisbrick, Starkey and Loades. He wrote The Tudor Constitution: Documents and Commentary about how Cromwell and Henry shaped the Parliament to their needs and coincidentially gave it more power. His greatest work is considered England Under the Tudors it is pretty extensive and best read in small bites, but it is amazing and gives a deeper insight to the complexities of the Tudor period.


message 21: by Jennifer, Mod #5 (new)

Jennifer (jennifertudor) | 951 comments Thanks Greg! I've added it to my list of books to find.


Lyn (Readinghearts) (lsmeadows) Great recommendations Greg.


message 23: by Aly (new)

Aly (Alygator) | 854 comments Jen, I found England Under the Tudors on Amazon. So it's probably available at a library or for inter-library loan (since you aren't buying books this year.. AAA!!).


message 24: by Jennifer, Mod #5 (new)

Jennifer (jennifertudor) | 951 comments LOL Thanks Aly :)


message 25: by Gregory (new)

Gregory House (greghouse) | 122 comments That's the bunny, S.T. Bindoff's Tudor England also used to be considered an older classic. While I've heard John Guy's Tudor England is similar but possibly more up todate. If your after free ebooks look up Pollard on Project gutenburg. He launched the the revival of Tudor research around 1910 actually for the age a very good read with a good pace. Good Luck


message 26: by Stephen (new)

Stephen | 3 comments Greg wrote: "GR Elton is considered the father of modern Tudor history he taught Scarisbrick, Starkey and Loades. He wrote The Tudor Constitution: Documents and Commentary about how Cromwell and..."

Elton's nephew is Ben Elton, English stand up comic and writer of the better series of the historical sitcom Blackadder. He says his uncle hated the WWI episodes, but eventually came to enjoy them.

On topic: Elton is a heavy hitting constitutional historian.


message 27: by Pam (new)

Pam | 1 comments HI just about to start this book, but am reading it in conjunctions with a podcast by a lovely woman from the USA, she disects the chapters and discusses them. The podcast is on itunes under tudor talk.
Personally I have already read Alison Weirs six wives and it was brilliant!


message 28: by Tammy (new)

Tammy (g8rbucsgirl) | 22 comments Thanks for that Pam! This book is now on my TBR list. That list just keeps getting longer and longer thanks to The Tudors.


message 29: by Gregory (new)

Gregory House (greghouse) | 122 comments Thanks for the pod cast information, I hadn't thought of checking for tudor podcasts


message 30: by Karen (last edited Jun 10, 2011 06:38AM) (new)

Karen (2noelle) | 37 comments Aly wrote: "Brittney, this is actually my least favorite of the Six Wives books, but I hope you enjoy it!!! I'm torn between Fraser's and Weir's as being my favorite one."

I agree with you, Aly, this is my least favorite one on the six wives of HR...I've read Weir and Fraser and like Weir's above the rest.

What I disliked about the Starkey book was his long winded sections after Catherine of Aragon, he completely lost me after that, some good information, but not very interesting.


message 31: by Lana (new)

Lana  (LanaBells) | 47 comments Hi there! I liked Starkey's book. He is verbose (let's face it, there are worse thing to be! I know I'd never make it as a lawyer!)! What I liked about it is that Henry is presented as man who is insecure, riddled with incongruity and knows that he is far from perfect. Starkey presents a fairly honest portrait of a complex man who history tends to remember for the horrors he committed instead of looking at the man behind the atrocities.


message 32: by Rebecca (new)

Rebecca Huston (telynor) | 9 comments Starkey's books about the Tudors managed to revive me a bit for the period; I certainly found his work to be invigorating, and gave me some new angles to think about. I need to get my hands on his second half of the book on Henry VIII.


message 33: by Kyra (new)

Kyra Kramer | 48 comments The thing about Starkey is (for me) that his writing is very "meh" and dry, but his research is godlike and his books are as factual as it is humanly possible to be. I don't read him for pleasure, I read him for information. I'm actually sad that he is such a good historian. His interviews indicate he is the worst type of patriarchal elitist.


message 34: by Phebe (new)

Phebe Lana wrote: "Starkey presents a fairly honest portrait of a complex man who history tends to remember for the horrors he committed instead of looking at the man behind the atrocities.
.."


I figure atrocities are atrocities and I'm not very interested in the worthless characters who commit them. I read a lot of Tudor history, but rarely read a book on Henry himself: he was an obnoxious character in many ways and mentally pathological.

I'll look at David Starkey's offerings on your suggestions, but I don't usually read these sorts of catalog books, all six for the price of one. Not generally deep enough for me.


message 35: by Meri (new)

Meri (aussie_bookworm) | 10 comments David Starkey's Six Wives was the very first book I read about the Tudors and it made me want to find put more about them. After this book I read Starkey's book on Elizabeth 1, again a well researched book and fascinating insight into this historical figure. After I read these books I started reading Philippa Gregory's books the Queen's Fool and the Virgin's Lover. Not read any of Weir's books but i do own a few.


message 36: by Patricia (new)

Patricia | 26 comments Meri wrote: "David Starkey's Six Wives was the very first book I read about the Tudors and it made me want to find put more about them. After this book I read Starkey's book on Elizabeth 1, again a well researc..."

I think David Starkey is excellent. I enjoyed his book on Elizabeth. He has also a box set DVD in which he covers the British Monarchy, with special emphasis on Henry VIII and Elizabeth. He is very clear and a joy to listen to.


message 37: by Michell (new)

Michell Karnes (royalreader) | 229 comments I have read Starkey's Six Wives as well as Weir and Fraser's and I have loved them all. And while it is a bit dry as you say I love it for its factual information which I find fascinating!!


message 38: by Patricia (new)

Patricia | 26 comments Patricia wrote: "Meri wrote: "David Starkey's Six Wives was the very first book I read about the Tudors and it made me want to find put more about them. After this book I read Starkey's book on Elizabeth 1, again a..."
Absolutely! I've read his "Elizabeth" and "Henry" (which is about Henry VIII's early years). I have his DVDs as well and they are brilliant. His explanations and diction are so clear that anyone new to history in general and the Tudors in particular would benefit immensely from these programmes.


message 39: by Marian (new)

Marian Patricia wrote: "Patricia wrote: "Meri wrote: "David Starkey's Six Wives was the very first book I read about the Tudors and it made me want to find put more about them. After this book I read Starkey's book on Eli..."
I love watching his youtube documentaries..skillful speaker he is:)


message 40: by Skye (new)

Skye | 484 comments Meri wrote: "David Starkey's Six Wives was the very first book I read about the Tudors and it made me want to find put more about them. After this book I read Starkey's book on Elizabeth 1, again a well researc..."

Patricia wrote: "Patricia wrote: "Meri wrote: "David Starkey's Six Wives was the very first book I read about the Tudors and it made me want to find put more about them. After this book I read Starkey's book on Eli..."

Patricia wrote: "Patricia wrote: "Meri wrote: "David Starkey's Six Wives was the very first book I read about the Tudors and it made me want to find put more about them. After this book I read Starkey's book on Eli..."
This is one writer I am considering. Thanks for posting this.


message 41: by Sabrina (new)

Sabrina Michel | 108 comments Gregory wrote: "Ahh I'm afraid so, extremely academic. However I read it in short sections between lots of other tudor books. I found it backed up at lot of the statements made by reputable historians. Of them all..."
I just found David Starkey's "Six Wives" in my attic. I haven't ever read it, but I plan to. Would anyone be interested in discussing it with me ?


message 42: by Skye (new)

Skye | 484 comments I didn't read it, Sabrina! Maybe I will order it, if you haven't read it yet.


message 43: by Jennifer (new)

Jennifer Rambo I checked out Starkey on YouTube. He is great. If I ever catch up with my stack of books to read I think I would enjoy him


message 44: by Marian (new)

Marian I love watching his Tudor videos Jennifer:)


message 45: by Michell (new)

Michell Karnes (royalreader) | 229 comments Sabrina wrote: "Gregory wrote: "Ahh I'm afraid so, extremely academic. However I read it in short sections between lots of other tudor books. I found it backed up at lot of the statements made by reputable histori..."

I have read it already but would love discussing it with you.


message 46: by Jennifer (new)

Jennifer Rambo Marian wrote: "I love watching his Tudor videos Jennifer:)"


*TUDOR^QUEEN* (on hiatus) (tudorqueen) | 35 comments I'm certain I've read the Starkey "Six Wives" book as I own the hardcover from years ago. However, it hasn't left a huge impression like the Antonia Fraser "Six Wives" book has. The Fraser book wound up being the basis for my trip to England, it was so remarkable out of the many I've read.


message 48: by Jennifer (new)

Jennifer Rambo So Marian, Should I feast on Starkey's documentaries or finish The Last Tutor? Such a delightful problem.


message 49: by Skye (last edited Sep 02, 2017 03:35AM) (new)

Skye | 484 comments *TUDOR^QUEEN* wrote: "I'm certain I've read the Starkey "Six Wives" book as I own the hardcover from years ago. However, it hasn't left a huge impression like the Antonia Fraser "Six Wives" book has. The Fraser book wou..."

Sabrina, I now have more insight into your very serious academic endeavors, and I must say I more than impressed for your reasons to travel abroad and your continued pursuit of academia.


message 50: by Marian (new)

Marian Jennifer wrote: "So Marian, Should I feast on Starkey's documentaries or finish The Last Tutor? Such a delightful problem."

I would have to say Jennifer..The Last Tudor.I havnt started that one yet:)How are you liking it so far?


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