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INTRODUCTIONS > Writing from a darker mind

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message 51: by Kenneth (new)

Kenneth Weene (KenWeene) | 132 comments cwt1954 wrote: "There's a new wine out for men with prostate problems. It's called Pinot More..."

As opposed to Pinot Slower, which is the best my physician has to offer.


message 52: by Pepsie (new)

Pepsie (PepsieJ) | 76 comments Let me know if this has any merit.


Cremation

Just fry me crispy
My empty shell
No need for fanfare
Leave the sheets!
Leave the clothes!
Send me out of this world
Stripped naked
Just like I came into it
No embalming!
No make up!
This face has seen it all
Goodness, badness,
joyful things too.
Now to the oven
As I go to the great abyss!
No praying!
No crying!
I go to the vast cosmos!
Where I began
Just a speck
No fear!
No death!
I live well into
the great forever!
It is simple and fair
what I want
with my husk
Just a faded echo
Of what was
But if it makes you feel better
Lay the cut flowers
In my hands.
And close my eyes…


message 53: by Dylan CC (new)

Dylan CC | 1126 comments M -

Thanks for bringing this one back up. Nice late afternoon read.


message 54: by M (new)

M | 1654 comments This is one of my favorites!


message 55: by Cece (new)

Cece | 101 comments Lily wrote: "Hello, I'm Lily, asuthor of dark fiction. I adore poetry, especially contemporary poetry. I do have a couple of poems published with Dark Eye Glances, and my writing style tends to be poetic.

I ..."


I agree. To me,Edgar Allen Poe was a poetic genius.


message 56: by M (new)

M | 1654 comments Which of his poems is your favorite?


message 57: by Cece (new)

Cece | 101 comments Lily wrote: "This is a discussion group for poetry. Not a classroom, not a university, not a convention for muclear physicists. Number one rule for any writer, always know your audience. There was nothing in th..."

I'm interested in seeing some of your poetry.


message 58: by M (new)

M | 1654 comments She hasn't posted here in quite some time, Cece. You might try www.darkeyeglances.com, but it doesn't look as though the latest issue got published.


message 59: by Cece (new)

Cece | 101 comments M wrote: "She hasn't posted here in quite some time, Cece. You might try www.darkeyeglances.com, but it doesn't look as though the latest issue got published."

Thank you. I'll check it out.


message 60: by Farrah (last edited May 18, 2011 11:10AM) (new)

Farrah I am a huge fan of Baudelaire. Although Poe has his place in poetry history.


message 61: by M (new)

M | 1654 comments I've wondered whether I would like Baudelaire. I've read some poems from Les Fleurs du Mal in translation, but I've never read the real thing. When it comes to French, I'm still at the saying hi and ordering coffee stage.


message 62: by Farrah (new)

Farrah I really enjoy his poetry and have learned much from it. His essays are very good too. Beautiful writer.


message 63: by Ruth (new)

Ruth | 5023 comments I didn't last long in The Flowers of Evil.


message 64: by M (new)

M | 1654 comments I like bits and pieces of the poems, for instance the first stanza of “The Sick Muse”:

Good morning, Muse--what’s wrong? Something you saw
last night is left in your hollow eyes;
your color’s bad, your cheeks are cold
with horror, with madness!--and you don’t say a word. . . .

Baudelaire, Charles. Les Fleurs du Mal. Trans. by Michael Mazur. Boston: David R. Godine, 1983. (Page 18.)


message 65: by Meg (new)

Meg  | 798 comments Be Drunk

Baudelaire

translated by Louis Simpson

You have to be always drunk. That's all there is to it—it's the only way. So as not to feel the horrible burden of time that breaks your back and bends you to the earth, you have to be continually drunk.

But on what? Wine, poetry or virtue, as you wish. But be drunk.

And if sometimes, on the steps of a palace or the green grass of a ditch, in the mournful solitude of your room, you wake again, drunkenness already diminishing or gone, ask the wind, the wave, the star, the bird, the clock, everything that is flying, everything that is groaning, everything that is rolling, everything that is singing, everything that is speaking. . .ask what time it is and wind, wave, star, bird, clock will answer you: "It is time to be drunk! So as not to be the martyred slaves of time, be drunk, be continually drunk! On wine, on poetry or on virtue as you wish."


message 66: by M (new)

M | 1654 comments Nice choice, Meg! Let’s make it three. Here’s another by Baudelaire.

As If A Serpent Danced

Dear indolent! I love to see
with every move you make
the iridescence of your skin
gleam like watered silk.

On your resilient head of hair,
unfathomable sea
of acrid curls that veer from brown
to blue inconstancies,

my dreamy soul weighs anchor, sails
for undiscovered skies
like a galleon in the morning watch
under a freshening wind.

Cruel? Kind? Your eyes reveal
nothing but themselves:
cold as a pair of brooches made
of gold inlaid with steel.

And when you walk to cadences
of sinuous nonchalance,
it looks as if a serpent danced
in rhythm to a wand.

Under the burden of your sloth,
your head--just like a child’s--
lolls with all the wobbly grace
of a baby elephant;

your body lists and rights itself
like a clipper in high seas,
rolling from side to side until
the spray has soaked its spars.

And like a current swollen by
the melt of clashing ice,
when the saliva in your mouth
surges through your teeth,

I seem to drink the devil’s brew,
salt and sovereign,
as if the sky had liquefied
and strewn my heart with stars!

Baudelaire, Charles. Les Fleurs du Mal. Trans. by Michael Mazur. Boston: David R. Godine, 1983. (Pages 33-35.)


message 67: by Jenn (new)

Jenn (JennInOhio) | 179 comments Hmm... I think I like Baudelaire! Thank you both for sharing. This line really appeals:

"And when you walk to cadences
of sinuous nonchalance"

Coincidentally, like Dickinson's snake poem, it hisses with S's too


message 68: by Farrah (new)

Farrah He just has a way of pulling you in. Connecting with something inside.

"And like a current swollen by the melt of clashing ice, when the saliva in hyour mouth surges through your teeth..."


message 69: by Farrah (new)

Farrah Baudelaire's letter to Marie Daubrun is one of my favorites...


message 70: by M (new)

M | 1654 comments I haven't read that.


message 71: by Rob the Obscure (new)

Rob the Obscure | 1906 comments (hahaha)

I haven't been coming here. It's nice to know that some things never change.


message 72: by Kayla (new)

Kayla Cunningham (mockingjay_1987) Lily wrote: "Hello, I'm Lily, asuthor of dark fiction. I adore poetry, especially contemporary poetry. I do have a couple of poems published with Dark Eye Glances, and my writing style tends to be poetic.

I ..."



Hi I saw your post and I would love some suggestions on my writing and poetry. I tend to have a darker side to writing as well and I would love to talk!


message 73: by Mirvan (new)

Mirvan  Ereon (mirvanereon) | 79 comments Me too. I love darkness and it shows in my work... Uhm, Rimbaud is really good too.


message 74: by Jasmine (new)

Jasmine (JasmineMW) | 12 comments John wrote: "Me too. I love darkness and it shows in my work... Uhm, Rimbaud is really good too."

Ditto. Anyone read Plath's later works? She's always been one of my favourites, even before I studied it at uni. Admittedly, I was estatic.

I've love to read your work. Have you posted it up anywhere?


message 75: by Mirvan (new)

Mirvan  Ereon (mirvanereon) | 79 comments Rose wrote: "John wrote: "Me too. I love darkness and it shows in my work... Uhm, Rimbaud is really good too."

Ditto. Anyone read Plath's later works? She's always been one of my favourites, even before I stud..."


I am actually now writing a poetry/art/flash fcition chapbook on necrophilia, cannibalism and death and decay. These are topics that I think are never explored so much in poetry so I plan to make my own place in this. My influences are of course De Sade, Bataille, Gottfried Benn, and actually, just my own thoughts. I am not a necrophiliac or a cannibal but these emotions of love makes me feel like one sometimes.

Check them out please. Uhm, send me a pm I guess because I am afraid to be tagged as self-promoting. Or could I just post it here?


message 76: by Jasmine (new)

Jasmine (JasmineMW) | 12 comments John wrote: "Rose wrote: "John wrote: "Me too. I love darkness and it shows in my work... Uhm, Rimbaud is really good too."

Ditto. Anyone read Plath's later works? She's always been one of my favourites, even ..."


Chapbook? I don't think I've ever come across that term before.

I rather like the death and decay sort of imagery; I write a bit of that myself. That's an admirable goal. I wish you good luck on that.

I’m not familiar with any of their work, but I looked at some of Bataille’s Poems. Interesting images. The black sun is an almost eerie sort of picture. I fell in love with the line “I’d dream to touch the sadness of the world…” but I’m still trying to figure out any possible reason as to associating eyes with pigs. The poem was De la bouse dans la tete. Anyone have any ideas with that? On another note, I couldn’t find De Sade’s work.

I don’t think it will be a problem posting the URL/link on this thread. You wouldn’t be the first person after all, and that way others can take a look at them without stumbling upon the barrier of having to ask. I'm afraid I have no idea how to send PMs on here.


message 77: by Mirvan (new)

Mirvan  Ereon (mirvanereon) | 79 comments Rose wrote: "John wrote: "Rose wrote: "John wrote: "Me too. I love darkness and it shows in my work... Uhm, Rimbaud is really good too."

Ditto. Anyone read Plath's later works? She's always been one of my favo..."


ok then i see...

A chapbook is a book that is shorter and smaller than usual, usually independently made or self-published and even handmade. =P All my books I want to be like that.

hmm de sade??? try going to the Project Gutenberg webiste. They have a lot of free books there especially classics. Dear Sade is there. I recommend 120 Days of Sodom. And for Bataille, read The Story of the Eye. I will be sure you would not forget it.

I do speak French too so thank you for sharing a French title =P

Here are my works. The last ones are the most horrible.

https://www.smashwords.com/profile/vi...


message 78: by Dale (new)

Dale Jr. (DRWilseyJr) | 103 comments "Generations of high school students who think "The Raven" is a great poem. Generations of college freshmen imitating Poe in poetry writing classes."

I'm rather late to the parade, but this has FAR less to do with Poe than it does our educational system and the poetry which we are exposed to at early ages by either rather mundane teachers or teachers who have their hands tied as to what they can teach.

Why does everyone think "The Raven" is one of the best poems written? Because, honestly, what do the majority of students get exposed to, poetry wise, in high school? Shakespeare? Chaucer? Frost? The pool is rather shallow in public schools and this goes for the lit that is taught as well.


message 79: by Jasmine (new)

Jasmine (JasmineMW) | 12 comments r.a

The suicide fic was a definite favourite of mine. It had quite a flair to it. I couldn't help but notice you've missed a fullstop at the end of one of your paragraphs. Why that would register and nothing else...idk.

What's the largest then? About 10,000 words? Or smaller.

The Story of the Eye was a little too focused on sex for me, but I did skim the beginning. I'm more of a fan of death and contemplation, inevitability...that kind of thing, as opposed to...well...I can't even explain it properly. Never mind.

If you're interested, my works can be found here: http://www.fictionpress.com/u/831107/...


message 80: by Jasmine (new)

Jasmine (JasmineMW) | 12 comments Dale R. wrote: ""Generations of high school students who think "The Raven" is a great poem. Generations of college freshmen imitating Poe in poetry writing classes."

I'm rather late to the parade, but this has FA..."


That's certainly interesting. I went to a private school and still studied Shakespeare and Frost. But it's true; our scope of poetry is generally limited to what we are exposed to in our younger years. Some forms of poetry, particularly certain variations of free-verse, seem almost nonsensical after spending years picking apart the structure of Yeats or Frost or Dickinson...or even Plath and Fobres who I did last year in lit.

On your note, now I have to wonder how we define poems as good or not so. After all, we're essentially comparing to a little database locked within our minds, so we can either like or dislike the things that are radically different from what we perceive as the norm, or vice versa. But that being said, I don't think we got exposed to a lot of dark poetry at school. Particularly in the lower levels, it isn't exactly appropriate in the scholastic context. Or wasn't anyway. They didn't even allow those sorts of poems/stories in the school magazines. So I really have to wonder how much of an effect that would have on our perception of dark poetry. I'm starting to wonder if it wasn't just a glamour to be sucked into, because it's something that wasn't allowed back in the school days.

Funnily enough, I've never actually read Poe's work.


message 81: by Dawn (new)

Dawn Galloway Lily, I am also new to this site and had intentions on introducing myself, but after reading this thread, I am having second thoughts! I am truly shocked by the way you have been treated here! I would just like to say I look foward to reading your poetry and I'm anxious to view your website. Again, I am so sorry for the brutal rudeness that has been forced upon you!


message 82: by Rob the Obscure (new)

Rob the Obscure | 1906 comments I'm still trying to get my head around the fact that someone here is named "Pepsie".

That's great! Except I prefer Coke. Do you have a sister?


message 83: by Rodney (new)

Rodney Wilder (rwilderII) Don't be discouraged, Lily! Welcome (two years late, but welcome all the same!) I have always written inspired by dark romanticists and those prone to gothica, so your writing would be eagerly received, I assure you. I hope to be able to read some of yours someday, as well as the bulk of you here. Seeing Poe and Sade mentioned, that is an invigorating bit of name-dropping. I love them both, and anyone who can call them influences has my attention.


message 84: by Kyle (last edited Jul 09, 2012 12:47PM) (new)

Kyle (I_am_Kyle) | 16 comments I like Heinrich Hein, he was a dark / sad & very romantic soul. I've enjoyed some very touching poems of his. I personally gravitate to German Romantic poets more than French Romantic poets, though I do very much enjoy french poetry. Also you can't go wrong with Goethe. That man was a genius. I think that poetry should work to explore and express the darker side of human behavior, (along with the brighter side) but as with all poetry, its very tricky to express feelings, especially acute ones, without sounding arrogant, selfish, or distant to the reader. I have that problem in reading and writing poetry, I think. Lastly, in the limited amount of poetry I've read, poetry exploring negative aspects of the human condition seems more vulnerable to those negative connotations I stated above... I do not know why this is or if it's just personal bias.

TL;DR

I like dark poetry.


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