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SERIES—List & Discussions > Wars of Light & Shadow--Curse of the Mistwraith, Ch IV, V, VI - SPOILERS!

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message 1: by Janny (new)

Janny (jannywurts) | 1003 comments You have arrived, and the picture widens and deepens. Over the years, I've seen readers make some fun and interesting presumptions about what is, and isn't, going on. Since it is the nature of the Fellowship Sorcerers NOT to explain unless they are asked....the indepth question to note will become: what have the characters not asked....certain terms have been used, but this is not an earth based culture...?

Spoil and speculate away.


message 2: by Shel, Moderator (new)

Shel (shel99) | 2262 comments Mod
Ok, I finished chapter 6 this afternoon (I love being a teacher in the summer...lots of time to read!). Some things I'm wondering about at this point:

What exactly is the relationship between the Koriathain sisterhood and the Fellowship sorcerers? It's obviously an antagonistic one, but why? Is it just a rivalry based on competition/jealousy or is there a deeper historical reason for it?

Asandir and Dakar seem to be hundreds of years old - have they perhaps sipped from the fountain, or is it because of their own power? And what is Dakar's power all about, anyway? Can he do anything besides prophesy? Do other sorcerers have pet prophets too, or is Dakar the only one?

Why is Asandir so reluctant to share information that may keep Arithon (and Lysaer too, though he doesn't seem to be behaving quite as recklessly) safe and alive? I know that he's afraid Arithon will skip out on his responsibilities (and with good reason), but it seems to me that abruptly ordering him around without explanation is exactly the way to get him to disregard those orders.

It's been said that men created the Mistwraith when the high kings were overthrown. What IS the Mistwraith? Is it sentient? Was it created by accident, sort of like the Sea of Chaos in Brust's Dragaera novels? Is there something special about the bloodlines of the high kings that kept it in check, or was it the stability of the entire society that, when overturned, allowed the Mistwraith in?

I am so glad we're doing this discussion in small chunks. It's forcing me to slow down and really think about each section, which doesn't always come naturally to me. There's a reason I majored in the sciences and not in literature!


message 3: by Dawn (new)

Dawn (breakofdawn) My biggest question at this point was about the block (or whatever you would call it) that Asindar put on Arithon when he was helping him recover from being touched by the shadows of Mearth. It seemed significant, and I wondered how it would affect the story down the line. I also wondered (this is more from the previous chapters) what the shadows of Mearth really were.

Another question I had/have is about the system of magic in the books. I'm not sure if I'm missing something, or if it will be revealed more as the story progresses, but I'd like to know more about how it works. I know Arithon has mastery over shadow and Lysaer over light, does that mean they have no control over other elements? And likewise, do normal sorcerers (ie the Fellowship) have mastery over all the elements? And what about the Koriani, how does their magic differ from the Fellowship? Is there significance in the fact that the Fellowship is all men while Koriani is all women? Could a Fellowship sorcerer be a woman? Could a man use the Koriani magic? Or are they the same systems? And what exactly are the lanes of power?

Maybe that's all supposed to be intuitive, or maybe it's slowly revealed, but those are the things I had been (and still am) wondering (I'm now about a third of the way into Ships).


message 4: by Sandra (new)

Sandra  (sleo) | 1141 comments Dawn, the system of magic is slowly revealed along the way. Fascinating when it comes alive. Great questions from both you and Shel.

I'm really glad we're doing this slowly. I am rereading and even though I'm compulsively reading ahead (it's a character flaw) all the discussion is making me really stop and think about things.


message 5: by Janny (new)

Janny (jannywurts) | 1003 comments Shel wrote: "Ok, I finished chapter 6 this afternoon (I love being a teacher in the summer...lots of time to read!). Some things I'm wondering about at this point:

What exactly is the relationship between the..."


Shel - All this will be answered, and in ever deepening detail.

Not only will you know, you will get to see it work.

And know the nuance between, say Asandir's and Dakar's longevity - because no, they did not drink from Davien's Five Centuries' Fountain, that had another purpose to its making.

If your answers aren't in this volume, they will be, in depth, down the line; and even more so, as the series wraps. NOTHING is arbitrary.

No, the Mistwraith is not anything like the Brust whatever it was. This will be unveiled - :)

There is only ONE other spellbinder, Fellowship trained, alive on Athera at this time. Look for that.

Could a woman be Fellowship trained - yes. Look for that, too.


message 6: by Jon (new)

Jon (jonmoss) | 626 comments Janny wrote: "There is only ONE other spellbinder, Fellowship trained, alive on Athera at this time. Look for that."

Besides Dakar? :)


message 7: by Janny (new)

Janny (jannywurts) | 1003 comments Dawn wrote: "My biggest question at this point was about the block (or whatever you would call it) that Asindar put on Arithon when he was helping him recover from being touched by the shadows of Mearth. It see..."

Dawn - Yes to the possibility of a woman being trained by Fellowship practice - it has happened, historically, look for her.

ALL of this will unveil in its right time and place - nothing is 'meant to be intuitive' - you will get the indepth view. But it runs through so many levels and layers, it would be too much of a wad (and no fun!) to digest all at once....therefore, when the appropriate scene to demonstrate it IN ACTION arises, naturally, you will encounter the layers one at a time.

And see it all work. And see it all work with innovation and evolving twists.

The history of the Fellowship and the Koriathain will also be revealed - in full. Not in lumps, either, but in dramatic event.

One last: the breaking of the blockage Asandir put over Arithon has occurred already. Perhaps easy to miss: look back at Curse of the Mistwraith, Ch IV, subchapter The Four Ravens.


message 8: by Dawn (last edited Jul 22, 2010 04:56PM) (new)

Dawn (breakofdawn) Janny wrote: "Dawn wrote: "My biggest question at this point was about the block (or whatever you would call it) that Asindar put on Arithon when he was helping him recover from being touched by the shadows of M..."

Right, I realized the break had occurred.. I just didn't have the book in front of me so I didn't know if it was in this chapter set (and didn't want to mention it for fear of it being a spoiler). Thinking back, I should have known. I know Elaria and Arithon met during this chapter set, and that's when the block broke.. I guess I just meant that when the block was initially placed, I immediately wondered how that would effect things down the road.

On that note, I'm going to have to start bringing CotMW with me to work (where I am now) so that when I'm slacking off and trolling around on goodreads, I'll have it to reference :-)


message 9: by Sandra (new)

Sandra  (sleo) | 1141 comments Dawn wrote: "Janny wrote: "Dawn wrote: "My biggest question at this point was about the block (or whatever you would call it) that Asindar put on Arithon when he was helping him recover from being touched by th..."

You're lucky you can get on Goodreads at work. My place of work has the site blocked. :(


message 10: by Christine (new)

Christine (chrisarrow) Janny,

Were you influence by Shakespeare's Lear when writing this? I keep seeing an inverted Edward/Edmond thing.


message 11: by Jon (new)

Jon (jonmoss) | 626 comments Sandra AKA Sleo wrote: "You're lucky you can get on Goodreads at work. My place of work has the site blocked. :("

Being in IT has it's advantages, mostly because I know how to bypass our firewall.

I have a Linux server at home (behind my own firewall) with two ports open. One of those ports I use to create a private encrypted VPN tunnel (using SSH and Putty). Then, I tell Firefox to use a proxy server (i.e., my private VPN tunnel I just created above) for all internet traffic. Wallah! Instant open access to the Internet. There's several good articles you can google for instructions on how to set up a similar VPN tunnel using a Windows computer at home. Just search for 'SSH VPN Putty'


message 12: by Sandra (new)

Sandra  (sleo) | 1141 comments Jon wrote: "Sandra AKA Sleo wrote: "You're lucky you can get on Goodreads at work. My place of work has the site blocked. :("

Being in IT has it's advantages, mostly because I know how to bypass our firewall...."


Aha! You are wicked. I'll read up and see if I can figure it out.


message 13: by Mawgojzeta (new)

Mawgojzeta | 178 comments Are the drifters (horse breeders) and the barbarians part of the same grouping or are they a totally different culture? I keep thinking I am missing something that already told me the answer.


message 14: by Janny (new)

Janny (jannywurts) | 1003 comments Dawn wrote: "Janny wrote: "Dawn wrote: "My biggest question at this point was about the block (or whatever you would call it) that Asindar put on Arithon when he was helping him recover from being touched by th..."

Asandir's own reaction (And Dakar's) when Arithon encountered the block, first out, would suggest this break was not expected.

Yes, it affected things - Arithon's attitude, watch for that as the chapters move along.


message 15: by Janny (new)

Janny (jannywurts) | 1003 comments Chris wrote: "Janny,

Were you influence by Shakespeare's Lear when writing this? I keep seeing an inverted Edward/Edmond thing."


Chris, while I was aware of Shakespear's work while writing this, not that particular play. I would have seen the legend of King Lear in other forms, but those two characters were not a part of the variations.

I read King Lear, (Shakespeare) at a later date.
So a correlation would be co-incidence; but great stories have common themes, if I stumbled on this and it was done there first - it's enjoyable to know there is common ground with a work that has certainly stood the test of time.

Maybe let others know what parallels you noticed, if you like, and think it might add to the discussion.

What a well read group! It's a pleasure.


message 16: by Janny (new)

Janny (jannywurts) | 1003 comments Mawgojzeta wrote: "Are the drifters (horse breeders) and the barbarians part of the same grouping or are they a totally different culture? I keep thinking I am missing something that already told me the answer."

(This post is informational, and while it draws references to a people mentioned in these chapters, it does not overtly spoil.)

The cultural fragmentation that occurred at the time of the great uprising and the rebellion happened regionally, so yes, there are slight differences in how the clanblood acted to save itself, or established its survival. The drifters are indeed old blood clan, but they found an niche to co-exist just a bit more peacefully. Geography played no small part, here, since Tysan was predominantly a port-oriented trade network. It had easier access to waterborne commerce. When the mist shut down navigation, land travel became more important. The old blood clan had the horses, and a bargain (uneasy at best) was struck to run the horse fair at West End.


message 17: by Mawgojzeta (new)

Mawgojzeta | 178 comments Thank you.


message 18: by Christine (new)

Christine (chrisarrow) I'll let others know the parrallels in the finished book section. I read the book earlier this year, so I can't remember how much of a spoiler some of them are going to be. Better safe than sorry.


message 19: by Janny (new)

Janny (jannywurts) | 1003 comments Mawgojzeta wrote: "Thank you."

You are most welcome! You raised a good point, too, not apparent unless you'd had access to the back history notes. I am pleased to answer such questions provided the story doesn't cover them already.


message 20: by Janny (new)

Janny (jannywurts) | 1003 comments Chris wrote: "I'll let others know the parrallels in the finished book section. I read the book earlier this year, so I can't remember how much of a spoiler some of them are going to be. Better safe than sorry."

Chris - your care and respect for the other readers is appreciated! thank you.


message 21: by Janny (new)

Janny (jannywurts) | 1003 comments There are older powers abroad in the world...Anybody have any thoughts about Mirthlvain and its resident parasites?


message 22: by Kerry (new)

Kerry (rocalisa) | 487 comments Hmmm, I hadn't specifically stopped to think about Mirthlvain - except that it clearly was old and had a history given the speed with which the sorcerers rushed to deal with it. I obviously wasn't considered a small problem.


message 23: by Janny (new)

Janny (jannywurts) | 1003 comments Kerry wrote: "Hmmm, I hadn't specifically stopped to think about Mirthlvain - except that it clearly was old and had a history given the speed with which the sorcerers rushed to deal with it. I obviously wasn't ..."

Not with three rings of walls, and a fortress to oversee the lot...

Watch for this.

A funny note on the early stages - my original editor asked (about Mirthlvain) - Can't this be cut?

I laughed.

As this story unfolds, and the series, also, let's see what you readers think.


message 24: by Dawn (new)

Dawn (breakofdawn) Janny wrote: "There are older powers abroad in the world...Anybody have any thoughts about Mirthlvain and its resident parasites?"

I would reply to this, but since I'm a little further in the series and a little more has been revealed, I don't think I have an unbiased opinion anymore. I think when I first read about them I was kind of confused as to why the scene was there, and why it was given so much importance. Now I understand a little better the reasons behind it.


message 25: by Sandra (new)

Sandra  (sleo) | 1141 comments Janny wrote: "There are older powers abroad in the world...Anybody have any thoughts about Mirthlvain and its resident parasites?"

I do, but it's further into the story, soooooo I will keep my big trap shut.

At the time I just figured it was something we'd find out more about later on in the story, but obviously something that needed to be controlled, or better yet wiped out.


message 26: by Janny (new)

Janny (jannywurts) | 1003 comments ;) - there's more coming, still. Why I split, laughing.

Now, if in fact, this scene had been a redundant little sidebar, I'd have kissed my note of thanks sent back to the editor and happily applied the 'delete' button.


message 27: by Richard (new)

Richard (thinkingbluecountingtwo) | 137 comments Janny wrote: "Now, if in fact, this scene had been a redundant little sidebar, I'd have kissed my note of thanks sent back to the editor..."

This is my first book of yours Janny, but I very much get the impression that you don't do redundant. So far I'm loving all the threads being laid down, which I'm sure will become a very rich tapestry indeed.


message 28: by Jon (last edited Jul 30, 2010 07:14AM) (new)

Jon (jonmoss) | 626 comments Some questions and observations I had after re-reading Chapter IV (see my notes here: http://www.goodreads.com/user_status/...)

What distinguishes s'Ilessid descent? The glossary is silent.

Does no one ever answer a question without supplying another question? (sorry, couldn't resist this one ... being facetious).

p. 107* Asandir 'silently asked forgiveness for the past.'

Whose past? Arithon's life on Dascen Elur? Asandir's past before Athera?

p. 108 'Through the breach stormed images poisonously backed with s'Ffalenn conscience, and also, incredibly s'Ahelas foresight, which linked cause to consequence.' (emphasis added) yet the revelation's enormity barely registered.

Why poisonously?

p. 110 Isn't Asandir's block placed in Arithon's mind a violation or direct conflict with the Law of Major Balance?

* all page references relevant to this edition of The Curse of the Mistwraith


message 29: by Sandra (new)

Sandra  (sleo) | 1141 comments Whoa! Great questions/notes, Jon.


message 30: by Janny (new)

Janny (jannywurts) | 1003 comments Richard wrote: "Janny wrote: "Now, if in fact, this scene had been a redundant little sidebar, I'd have kissed my note of thanks sent back to the editor..."

This is my first book of yours Janny, but I very much g..."


For Later: dust up your physics. ;) This is not NECESSARY to the story - but it will (if you are so inclined) open vistas...there are so many angles of access to this story's underpinnings - few who have peeked into that angle.


message 31: by Janny (new)

Janny (jannywurts) | 1003 comments Jon wrote: "Some questions and observations I had after re-reading Chapter IV (see my notes here: http://www.goodreads.com/user_status/...)

What distinguishes s'Ilessid descent? The glossary is silen..."


OK Jon - grin.

What distinguishes any lineage's descent? The story will cover this, but obliquely (so far). You can find out in depth - and it may shock you to learn: Mayors are elected for LIFE TERM. Kingship does not follow the rules you are accustomed to. You will not be spoiled if you do this: Get your copy of Stormed Fortress (if you have the paperback with the dragon on the cover) OR if you have the US hardbound or tradepaperback (Meisha Merlin edition) of Traitor's Knot. Open to the back, and read the APPENDIX. It will detail the succession, (crown and caithdein) in depth. It will provide an overall view of clan bloodlines, the purpose of them, and also, show how charter law functions in the towns and in the free wilds. MIND THIS: the story will deliver this melted into the action - and a few 'ah ha!" moments will be shifted because you will understand how the compact was set up - but the detailed information you are asking for is all in that bit, if you want the feed in one take.

Your facetious question (grin) does no one ever answer a question without supplying another: are you referring to the STORY or the DISCUSSION?

Story: the book unfolds through the characters and action in layers, so you accrete what you know in memorable events - so you would remember the dramatic moment and retain the intricacy easily - it goes in stages because I wanted a story, not an info dump. (grin)

Discussion: two reasons. One, readers are shy about posting and asking enough questions...two, this is a rare opportunity for an IN DEPTH read...and so, to begin to explore all the detail that is set into the pages - some questions are posted to provoke the indepth awareness that will enrich the experience many readers MIGHT only get, with a reread or series of re-reads. Since the unfoldments are still happening, there are layers yet to come. But participants of this discussion will be extremely well equipped to spot nuance, going forward. The discussions will get better as a result.

Next - the word choice 'poisonously' is precise: because (as the story will demonstrate) that the royal trait for compassion that gives rise to s'Ffalenn conscience, that creates so many well thought responses, is ALSO a character flaw, set under certain conditions. Go back to Morriel's take on Arithon's character, and watch for future developments.

Did Asandir break the Law of the Major Balance here?
He cut the line extremely fine! This is a good discussion point: how did he, or how didn't he? I could answer this, but, let's see what you readers make of it first.

The Law of the Major balance: nothing is done without conscious consent.


message 32: by Jon (last edited Jul 30, 2010 08:21AM) (new)

Jon (jonmoss) | 626 comments Janny wrote: "Your facetious question (grin) does no one ever answer a question without supplying another: are you referring to the STORY or the DISCUSSION?
"


The STORY. :)

Not saying I don't like it. In fact, I use this tactic constantly during family conversations and debates. Drives everyone else bonkers. :)


message 33: by Jon (new)

Jon (jonmoss) | 626 comments Janny wrote: "Get your copy of Stormed Fortress (if you have the paperback with the dragon on the cover) OR if you have the US hardbound or tradepaperback (Meisha Merlin edition) of Traitor's Knot. Open to the back, and read the APPENDIX. It will detail the succession, (crown and caithdein) in depth. It will provide an overall view of clan bloodlines, the purpose of them, and also, show how charter law functions in the towns and in the free wilds. "

I will do this first thing when I return home from work. Thanks for the tip. I haven't even cracked that one open yet.


message 34: by Janny (new)

Janny (jannywurts) | 1003 comments Jon wrote: "Janny wrote: "Get your copy of Stormed Fortress (if you have the paperback with the dragon on the cover) OR if you have the US hardbound or tradepaperback (Meisha Merlin edition) of Traitor's Knot..."

Well, grin, don't flip through the story pages out of sequence...unless you want your hair on fire. :) Because EVERYTHING comes to a head, at end of arc III.


message 35: by Jon (new)

Jon (jonmoss) | 626 comments Just starting Chapter VI. Erdane and realized something that may be a stylistic or formatting decision by the author.

Janny: The Erdane chapter starts on the right hand odd numbered page (p. 177 specifically) in my edition of The Curse of the Mistwraith. For the first time in this paperback, a blank page exists (on the facing left hand page which would have been p. 176).

Thumbing quickly through the paperback, I notice a couple of other similar instances.

Did you direct the publisher to always start a chapter on an odd numbered right hand page?

And can you explain the icon used at the beginning of each chapter set. It looks like a variation on the theme of a trefoil knot.


message 36: by Janny (new)

Janny (jannywurts) | 1003 comments Jon wrote: "Just starting Chapter VI. Erdane and realized something that may be a stylistic or formatting decision by the author.

Janny: The Erdane chapter starts on the right hand odd numbered page (p. 177..."


Jon - in the very bad old days, when cost cutting was not such a rampant issue, publishers would have fainted dead at the thought of opening a chapter on anything ELSE but the right hand page, even if it meant the left hand page was blank....one more bit of book elegance and design, evidently forgotten. :)

I recall my editor tearing her hair out, trying to hold onto this formatting, when the length of the book and the price, and the profit margin, of course, created the chinese puzzle that is today's numbers game.

The short answer is, this was done because it was PRETTY.

The trefoil you linked to is a continuous knot.

Although the graphic for Curse of the Mistwraith is also a tri-axial design, it is significant that it is NOT a continuous knot, but three interlinked counterclockwise spirals. The underlying symbology is deliberate and ties back into the Paravians.

How deeply do you wish to go into this?


message 37: by Jon (new)

Jon (jonmoss) | 626 comments Janny wrote: "The trefoil you linked to is a continuous knot.

Although the graphic for Curse of the Mistwraith is also a tri-axial design, it is significant that it is NOT a continuous knot, but three interlinked counterclockwise spirals. The underlying symbology is deliberate and ties back into the Paravians.

How deeply do you wish to go into this? "


A bit more. I guess I should have put my reading glasses on before assuming it was a continuous knot (like the trefoil). Three separate spirals intertwined but not otherwise connected, rooted or sprouting from the circle that is Ath? Just guessing here. :)


message 38: by Janny (new)

Janny (jannywurts) | 1003 comments OK, Jon.

First, Three spirals, Three Paravian races.

Next, the Triaxial aspect of the Mysteries - The Light (that which is known) The Dark (that which is hidden) and The Unknowable (that which lies always beyond cognizance)

The circle would be Athera, the World.

Why counter-clockwize?

Clockwise = power of will (applied force)
Counterclockwise - power of being (power in potentia)

The spirals are shown OPEN because, within the world's circle, the Aspects and the Paravian races are without limit - Paravia is a place of LIVING mysteries. The circle of life and death as we know it includes something more - this will open up as the series progresses.


message 39: by Jon (new)

Jon (jonmoss) | 626 comments Janny wrote: "OK, Jon.

First, Three spirals, Three Paravian races.

Next, the Triaxial aspect of the Mysteries - The Light (that which is known) The Dark (that which is hidden) and The Unknowable (that which li..."


Beautiful! I guessed the three Paravian races equivalency to the three spirals.

Thank you for the wonderful explanation and detailed symbolism. I love it! :)


message 40: by Sandra (new)

Sandra  (sleo) | 1141 comments Janny wrote: "OK, Jon.

First, Three spirals, Three Paravian races.

Next, the Triaxial aspect of the Mysteries - The Light (that which is known) The Dark (that which is hidden) and The Unknowable (that which li..."


That's awesome!


message 41: by Dawn (new)

Dawn (breakofdawn) Janny wrote: "OK, Jon.

First, Three spirals, Three Paravian races.

Next, the Triaxial aspect of the Mysteries - The Light (that which is known) The Dark (that which is hidden) and The Unknowable (that which li..."


This isn't in regard to this book, but it's spoiler free (and you obviously don't have to answer if the answer has spoilers), but do the icons at the beginnings of the chapter sets of Ships (and the other books for that matter) have a meaning as well?


message 42: by Janny (new)

Janny (jannywurts) | 1003 comments Dawn wrote: "Janny wrote: "OK, Jon.

First, Three spirals, Three Paravian races.

Next, the Triaxial aspect of the Mysteries - The Light (that which is known) The Dark (that which is hidden) and The Unknowable ..."


Dawn - there is NOTHING WHATSOEVER in these books that is random. Yes. Each icon has meaning and symbolic echoes.

In fact, also, the cover images are LOADED with them. Few people ask. The symbolic presentations in the US cover image for Mistwraith alone - ran to paragraphs, once, when a reader queried.

We can discuss the covers and these aspects as you like. I will respond to them as they don't spoil, or we can tackle them with each book, on a volume by volume basis as the discussion moves on.


message 43: by Janny (new)

Janny (jannywurts) | 1003 comments Sandra AKA Sleo wrote: "Janny wrote: "OK, Jon.

First, Three spirals, Three Paravian races.

Next, the Triaxial aspect of the Mysteries - The Light (that which is known) The Dark (that which is hidden) and The Unknowable ..."


Well, the fun part's to come when you get to see this stuff work...


message 44: by Janny (new)

Janny (jannywurts) | 1003 comments Jon wrote: "Janny wrote: "OK, Jon.

First, Three spirals, Three Paravian races.

Next, the Triaxial aspect of the Mysteries - The Light (that which is known) The Dark (that which is hidden) and The Unknowable ..."


Thanks - those are only the bits I was able to put in without spoilers...


message 45: by Stefan, Group Founder + Moderator (Retired) (new)

Stefan (sraets) | 1667 comments Mod
(Just a quick note here, as someone who's been ready to start on Peril's Gate for a while but hasn't been able to because of other obligations --- this REALLY makes me want to get back to this series!)


message 46: by Sandra (new)

Sandra  (sleo) | 1141 comments Stefan wrote: "(Just a quick note here, as someone who's been ready to start on Peril's Gate for a while but hasn't been able to because of other obligations --- this REALLY makes me want to get back to this ser..."

Chuckle. There's something about it that's keeping me trapped! I'm in Fugitive Prince for a reread. Peril's Gate though is a totally awesome book as it's really the climax of this third arc of the series. Huge things happen. Get with it, man! I can't wait to see what you think!


message 47: by Kerry (new)

Kerry (rocalisa) | 487 comments At whatever is an appropriate time, I'm very much like to discuss the covers and the symbolism in them.

And speaking of appropriate times, being a completist kind of person, I bought the two anthologies that were mentioned (Under Cover of Darkness and Masters of Fantasy and would appreciate a hint on where through the series would be appropriate places to read the stories.

Thanks.


message 48: by Janny (new)

Janny (jannywurts) | 1003 comments Stefan wrote: "(Just a quick note here, as someone who's been ready to start on Peril's Gate for a while but hasn't been able to because of other obligations --- this REALLY makes me want to get back to this ser..."

Happy to see this anticipation!


message 49: by Janny (new)

Janny (jannywurts) | 1003 comments Sandra AKA Sleo wrote: "Stefan wrote: "(Just a quick note here, as someone who's been ready to start on Peril's Gate for a while but hasn't been able to because of other obligations --- this REALLY makes me want to get b..."

Actually, Peril's Gate is the tipping point; Stormed Fortress is Arc III's climax.


message 50: by Janny (new)

Janny (jannywurts) | 1003 comments Kerry wrote: "At whatever is an appropriate time, I'm very much like to discuss the covers and the symbolism in them.

And speaking of appropriate times, being a completist kind of person, I bought the two ant..."


The short stories run independently of the series and could be read at any time. Actually, Child of Prophecy was designed as an 'intro' for the series in general.

Sundering Star was done as an inside joke - here's the 'history' - Jana Paniccia (editor) invited me to write for the anthology. She was a longtime reader of the series....and the 'theme' was secret societies...I decided to pull a fast one on her - write a story that absolutely FIT the theme of her anthology to a T - and - in the midst of a story that looked SOOOO unrelated to the series - wham! - chuck in a reference that tied it firmly and indisputably into the Atheran universe's back history - I think I actually could hear her crowing shout, all the way from the Great White North (she's from Canada) to my desk in Florida. Too her that off guard. ;)

The third story, Reins of Destiny - might read best, though, after you've read Mistwraith.


Now, as to the symbolism of the covers: which one do you wish to start with? USA, or the early British one (obviously Mistwraith).


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