You'll love this one...!! A book club & more discussion

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Closed Discussion Topic > Aug. - Oct. Book Nominations

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message 1: by Molly (last edited Jun 23, 2010 07:54AM) (new)

Molly | 270 comments After a very active flurry of votes, the following Themes have won for August, September and October (in no particular order):

-Africa
-Books That Made It To The Big Screen
-Legends


Time to nominate books for each category!!!

Please provide all of the following in a comment below:

-Which Theme it is for
-The title
-The author
-Brief description of the book

IF YOU DON'T PROVIDE ALL OF THE ABOVE YOUR NOMINATION WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED

**If you nominate a book it is assumed that you are willing to lead the discussion, which is easy and painless - we promise!**

Up to three nominations per person - one for each Theme. Thank you!

You have 3 days to nominate. Nominations will be accepted through midnight EST, Friday 25th of June.


message 2: by Cecily (last edited Jun 23, 2010 12:44AM) (new)

Cecily | 576 comments Do we do this by messaging you, posting our choices here or are you going to set up a poll for each month?


message 3: by Shelli (last edited Jun 23, 2010 05:52AM) (new)

Shelli For books that made it to the big screen....I'd like to nominateFight ClubbyChuck Palahniuk.
Fight Club


Fight Club is a 1996 novel by Chuck Palahniuk. It follows the experiences of an unnamed protagonist struggling with insomnia. Inspired by his doctor's exasperated remark that insomnia is not suffering, he finds relief by impersonating a seriously ill person in several support groups. Then he meets a mysterious man named Tyler Durden and establishes an underground fighting club as radical psychotherapy.[1:]

In 1999, director David Fincher adapted the novel into a film of the same name, starring Brad Pitt and Edward Norton. The film acquired a cult following despite lower than expected box-office results. The film's notoriety heightened the profile of the novel and that of Palahniuk.


message 4: by Molly (new)

Molly | 270 comments Cecily wrote: "Do we do this by messaging you, posting our choices here or are you going to set up a poll for each month?"

Leave nominations via Comment here as has always been done in the past. When the nominating period ends, we'll put up 3 separate polls - one for each Theme so everyone can vote for the book they want in each.


message 5: by Karen (new)

Karen (karenf) | 20 comments My nomination for Books that Made it to the Big Screen is Shutter Island by Dennis Lehane.

Summer, 1954.
U.S. Marshal Teddy Daniels has come to Shutter Island, home of Ashecliffe Hospital for the Criminally Insane. Along with his partner, Chuck Aule, he sets out to find an escaped patient.But nothing at Ashecliffe Hospital is what it seems. And neither is Teddy Daniels.
Is he there to find a missing patient? Or has he been sent to look into rumors of Ashecliffe's radical approach to psychiatry? An approach that may include drug experimentation, hideous surgical trials, and lethal countermoves in the shadow war against Soviet brainwashing ...
The closer Teddy and Chuck get to the truth, the more elusive it becomes, and the more they begin to believe that they may never leave Shutter Island.
Because someone is trying to drive them insane ...


message 6: by Molly (new)

Molly | 270 comments Shelli wrote: "For books that made it to the big screen....I'd like to nominateFight ClubbyChuck Palahniuk.
Fight Club ..."


Oooo - I've never read that but I love the movie! Was always curious if the book was even better.


message 7: by Karen (last edited Jun 23, 2010 07:58AM) (new)

Karen (karenofthebookworm) Karen wrote: "My nomination for Books that Made it to the Big Screen is Shutter Island by Dennis Lehane.

Summer, 1954.
U.S. Marshal Teddy Daniels has come to Shutter Island, home of Ashecliffe Hospital for th..."


Loved the movie, haven't read the book yet but it is on my tbr pile so I'd vote for that.


message 8: by Shelli (new)

Shelli I haven't watched the movie or read the book, but have always been interested in both since my boys love the movie!
Shutter Island is very good....both book and movie.


message 9: by John (new)

John My nomination for African book, "Brazzaville Beach - William Boyd. Hope Clearwater sits on Brazzaville Beach contemplating her time as a chimpanzee researcher and her failed marriage.

My nomination for Books That Made The Big Screen, "An Unfinished Life". Griff sits on her bed waiting for her mother, Jean, to get them out of yet another abusive relationship, "Her mother is good at finding the same man, no matter where she lives". Through various circumstances they go to live with Einar, Jean's estranged father-in-law. Einar's son was killed in a car accident(an unfinished life) and Einar blames Jean. But Einar's life contains demons too, as Einar looks after the ranch and his disabled friend Mitch. Griff is the glue that holds this troubled family together.

The movie was a good adaptation of the book and starred Robert Redford, Morgan Freeman, Jennifer Lopez and Becca Gardner as Griff.


message 10: by Cecily (new)

Cecily | 576 comments Have people realised that all of us can nominate a book for each of ALL THREE categories?

I'm still pondering my choices...


message 11: by Karen (new)

Karen (karenf) | 20 comments Cecily wrote: "Have people realised that all of us can nominate a book for each of ALL THREE categories?

I'm still pondering my choices..."


Yes, I realized that, but don't really have any strong opinions on the other two categories.


message 12: by Molly (new)

Molly | 270 comments Hmmm - now I'm wondering if it would be easier if I set up a separate thread for each Theme for people to nominate books under each? I figured having them all in one place would be less confusing but maybe each having their own spot would give proper attention to each Theme?


message 13: by Cecily (last edited Jun 24, 2010 01:43AM) (new)

Cecily | 576 comments My nominations

Book that made it to the big screen
Brideshead Revisited by Evelyn Waugh
This has been on the small and big screen, though the latter took greater liberties with the plot. It is an evocative and nostalgic tale, infused with class, religion and repressed (homo)sexuality (no graphic details). The early part is set before WW2 at Oxford university and most of the latter part in the run up to and during the war. The Oxford phase is light frivolity; what follows is much darker and more painful.

Legends
The Selected Works of T. S. Spivet
by Reif Larsen.
A 12 year old genius, obsessed with maps sets out alone to travel, discovering (and mapping) his family and anything else that takes his fancy - the book has plenty of diagrams, footnotes and sketches. A secret family history found within his luggage tells the story of T.S.’s ancestors and their long-ago passage west, offering profound insight into the family he left behind and his role within it. As T.S. reads he discovers the sometimes shadowy boundary between fact and fiction and realizes that, for all his analytical rigor, the world around him is a mystery.

As for Africa, I'm stumped (and also a little puzzled that it won as a category, but no one has suggested a single book yet).


message 14: by Molly (new)

Molly | 270 comments Cecily wrote: "As for Africa, I'm stumped (and also a little puzzled that it won as a category, but no one has suggested a single book yet)..."

John nominated Brazzaville Beach by William Boyd above for the Africa theme.


message 15: by Cecily (last edited Jun 23, 2010 02:49PM) (new)

Cecily | 576 comments Oh yes, so he did. This new method will take a bit of getting used to. LOL


message 16: by Shannon (new)

Shannon (sianin) | 453 comments John has recommended a book that I want to read for Africa but I will nominate another (since there are a couple on my tbr pile):
Half of a Yellow Sun by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie.

I am not sure what the category "legend" even means so do not have a suggestion for that one.

Still thinking about one hat made it as a movie.


message 17: by Molly (new)

Molly | 270 comments I'm not sure what Legend means either Shannon. Jenny nominated that one so perhaps she can shed some light on what she intended for her definition. Plenty of others must have an opinion on what it means since it garnered quite a few votes!


message 18: by Molly (new)

Molly | 270 comments Shannon - could you give a brief overview of the book you nominated? Makes it easier to read the descriptions here rather than clicking through to each book's link. Thanks!


message 19: by Molly (new)

Molly | 270 comments I nominate "Push" by Sapphire under the Books that made it to the Movies theme.

A troubling coming of age all too soon story marred by incest, abuse and low self-esteem. A teacher's belief helps give a young teen a way out of the cycle. Fictional debut turned into Best Picture nominee (titled "Precious") and Oscar winning Best Supporting Actress performance by Mo'Nique for 2010.

I would nominate The Poisonwood Bible for the Africa theme but I'm not sure I'm ready to re-read that one! If someone else wants to nominate it, feel free.


message 20: by Shannon (new)

Shannon (sianin) | 453 comments oops, sorry gang, I forgot to paste my description.

Africa:
Half of a Yellow Sun

With the effortless grace of a natural storyteller, Adichie weaves together the lives of five characters caught up in the extraordinary tumult of the decade. Fifteen-year-old Ugwu is houseboy to Odenigbo, a university professor who sends him to school, and in whose living room Ugwu hears voices full of revolutionary zeal. Odenigbo’s beautiful mistress, Olanna, a sociology teacher, is running away from her parents’ world of wealth and excess; Kainene, her urbane twin, is taking over their father’s business; and Kainene’s English lover, Richard, forms a bridge between their two worlds. As we follow these intertwined lives through a military coup, the Biafran secession and the subsequent war, Adichie brilliantly evokes the promise, and intimately, the devastating disappointments that marked this time and place. (taken from litlovers)


message 21: by Karen (new)

Karen (karenofthebookworm) Playing the Enemy: Nelson Mandela and the Game That Made a Nation by John Carlin.

This is the story of Nelson Mandela's attempt to unite South Africa using the national rugby team during the 1995 world cup which was held in South Africa. To many this didn't seem like a cause that the entire country would unite behind as the team had long been seen as the embodiment of white supremacist rule and during apartheid the black population would support whoever they were playing.


As for the category I'd say any one of them, it is set in South Africa, it has been made into a movie and I would regard Nelson Mandela as a legend.


message 22: by Lioba (new)

Lioba I'll nominate two books.

Africa:

The No 1 Ladies' Detective Agency by Alexander McCall Smith

Penzler Pick, July 2001: Working in a mystery tradition that will cause genre aficionados to think of such classic sleuths as Melville Davisson Post's Uncle Abner or Robert van Gulik's Judge Dee, Alexander McCall Smith creates an African detective, Precious Ramotswe, who's their full-fledged heir.

It's the detective as folk hero, solving crimes through an innate, self-possessed wisdom that, combined with an understanding of human nature, invariably penetrates into the heart of a puzzle. If Miss Marple were fat and jolly and lived in Botswana--and decided to go against any conventional notion of what an unmarried woman should do, spending the money she got from selling her late father's cattle to set up a Ladies' Detective Agency--then you have an idea of how Precious sets herself up as her country's first female detective. Once the clients start showing up on her doorstep, Precious enjoys a pleasingly successful series of cases.

But the edge of the Kalahari is not St. Mary Mead, and the sign Precious orders, painted in brilliant colors, is anything but discreet. Pointing in the direction of the small building she had purchased to house her new business, it reads "THE NO. 1 LADIES DETECTIVE AGENCY. FOR ALL CONFIDENTIAL MATTERS AND ENQUIRIES. SATISFACTION GUARANTEED FOR ALL PARTIES. UNDER PERSONAL MANAGEMENT."

The solutions she comes up with, whether in the case of the clinic doctor with two quite different personalities (depending on the day of the week), or the man who had joined a Christian sect and seemingly vanished, or the kidnapped boy whose bones may or may not be those in a witch doctor's magic kit, are all sensible, logical, and satisfying. Smith's gently ironic tone is full of good humor towards his lively, intelligent heroine and towards her fellow Africans, who live their lives with dignity and with cautious acceptance of the confusions to which the world submits them. Precious Ramotswe is a remarkable creation, and The No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agency well deserves the praise it received from London's Times Literary Supplement. I look forward with great eagerness to the upcoming books featuring the memorable Miss Ramotswe, Tears of the Giraffe and Morality for Beautiful Girls, soon to be available in the U.S.
--Otto Penzler

Books that made it to the big screen:

The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde

Spellbound before his own portrait, Dorian Gray utters a fateful wish. In exchange for eternal youth he gives his soul, to be corrupted by the malign influence of his mentor, the aesthete and hedonist Lord Henry Wotton. The novel was met with moral outrage by contemporary critics who, dazzled perhaps by Wilde's brilliant style, may have confused the author with his creation, Lord Henry, to whom even Dorian protests, 'You cut life to pieces with your epigrams.'. Encouraged by Lord Henry to substitute pleasure for goodness and art for reality, Dorian tries to watch impassively as he brings misery and death to those who love him. But the picture is watching him, and, made hideous by the marks of sin, it confronts Dorian with the reflection of his fall from grace, the silent bearer of what is in effect a devastating moral judgement.


message 23: by Kimberly (new)

Kimberly | 2033 comments Africa
I Dreamed of Africa by Kuki Gallmann
At the age of 25, Kuki Gallmann moved to Kenya with her future husband, where they established a vast ranch. But Africa's beauty does't come without a price, and when tragedy struck, Kuki found herself pregnant and alone with her young son and 90,000 acres of Africa to oversee.

Books that made it to the big screen

Born Free: A Lioness of Two Worlds by Joy Adamson

First published in 1960 and closely followed by a hit movie of the same name, Joy Adamson's now classic memoir Born Free continues to introduce countless young people to the wildlife of Africa. Adamson recounts her adventures as the surrogate mother of an orphaned lion cub named Elsa (with parenting duties shared by her husband George and by a delightfully imperturbable rock hyrax named Pati), whom she raised as a welcome member of her human and animal family while painstakingly teaching Elsa the skills she would need to survive in the wild. Her teaching, against all odds, was effective: three years later, the Adamsons took Elsa to a place near that of her birth and set her loose, hoping that she would find her "real pride" among other lions of the Kenya grasslands--as she soon did.
Long targeted to preteen readers, Born Free is in fact a sophisticated work of environmental consciousness-raising, for Joy Adamson believed that any relationship between humans and wild animals had to be conditioned by an attitude "of absolute equality quite different from that between a dog and his master." Although Elsa's story had an ultimately tragic ending--the young lioness died of disease and, in separate incidents, Joy and George Adamson were both murdered--Joy Adamson's book continues to instruct and entertain readers of all ages. --Gregory McNamee


message 24: by Sofie (new)

Sofie Africa
King Solomon's Mines by H. Rider Haggard
Following a mysterious map of dubious reliability, a small group of men trek into southern Africa in search of a lost friend-and a lost treasure, the fabled mines of King Solomon. Led by the English adventurer and fortune hunter Allan Quartermain, they discover a frozen corpse, survive untold dangers in remote mountains and deserts, and encounter the merciless King Twala en route to the legendary hoard of diamonds.


message 25: by Shannon (new)

Shannon (sianin) | 453 comments I am gong to withdraw my Africa nomination because I don't want to spread the vote too thin. So please remove half yellow sun.

Thanks.

Still unclear on legend.


message 26: by BurgendyA (new)

BurgendyA | 77 comments Shelli wrote: "I haven't watched the movie or read the book, but have always been interested in both since my boys love the movie!
Shutter Island is very good....both book and movie."



I read the novel Shutter Island this year, and seen the movie. I loved the book. It was a total mind bending thrill. The movie was good & interesting. Some differences from the book, but that doesn't surprise me coming from films. =)~


message 27: by Molly (new)

Molly | 270 comments Well - since Jenny is not around to clarify for us, I'm going to interpret the theme of Legends as books about legendary people. So I will nominate:

Life with Picasso by Francoise Gilot

This is a memoir by Picasso's 40+ years his junior girlfriend and mother to his children, which claims to give an inside look at the man behind the art.


message 28: by Jenny (new)

Jenny (notestothemoon) | 846 comments Sorry!! Missed this flurry of activity!! By legends I meant people. Robin hood, king Arthur that kind of thing. But more recent legends are perfectly okay. The books nominated so far for the topic are perfectly okay :)


message 29: by Jenny (new)

Jenny (notestothemoon) | 846 comments Here's my nomination for legends.

The Winter King by Bernard Cornwell

'Once upon a time, in a land that was called Britain, these things happened . . . . and I was there, and this is how it was.' The Winter King , like the rest of the trilogy, is narrated by Derfel (which is pronounced Dervel), one of Arthur's warriors. This first book tells how after the death of Uther, High King of Britain, the country falls into chaos. Uther's heir is a child, Mordred, and Arthur, his uncle, is named one of the boy's guardians. Arthur has to fight other British kingdoms and the dreadful "Sais" - the Saxons - who are invading Britain. Arthur is supposed to marry Ceinwyn, a princess of Powys, but falls disastrously in love with Guinevere - 'There have been many more beautiful women, and thousands who were better, but since the world was weaned I doubt there have been many so unforgettable as Guinevere . . . and it would have been better, Merlin always said, had she been drowned at birth.'


message 30: by Jaime (new)

Jaime | 240 comments Jenny wrote: "Here's my nomination for legends.

The Winter King by Bernard Cornwell

'Once upon a time, in a land that was called Britain, these things happened . . . . and I was the..."


Oooo...I just found a used copy of this book for sale at the local library and bought it for my husband for .50cents!


message 31: by Keith711 (new)

Keith711 | 11 comments Kimberly wrote: " Africa
I Dreamed of Africa by Kuki Gallmann
At the age of 25, Kuki Gallmann moved to Kenya with her future husband, where they established a vast ranch. But Africa's..."


seen the film several times as a teenager - absolutely beutiful. Book is good read also, though so long ago cannot remember detail, though remember laughing and crying :)


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