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Monthly "READS" > MAY 2010 reads

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JoAnn/QuAppelle | 1608 comments Mod
Please post here the books you read during May. A little comment is always welcome!


message 2: by JoAnn/QuAppelle (last edited May 31, 2010 04:27PM) (new)

JoAnn/QuAppelle | 1608 comments Mod
I had a good reading month. The beginning of the month was light reading because we were dealing with Charmer's death and that is all I could manage. You can see my reviews here:
http://www.goodreads.com/review/list/...

and here are links to the eight books I read:

The Hot Flash Club Strikes Again: A Novel 4 stars

Hot Flash Holidays: A Novel 4 stars

The Hot Flash Club Chills Out: A Novel audio - 3 stars

Florence of Arabia: A Novel audio - 4 stars

House Secrets: A Joe DeMarco Thriller 4 stars

Beautiful Boy: A Father's Journey Through His Son's Addiction --- 5 stars

The Scent of Rain and Lightning 5 stars

Love You, Mean It: A True Story of Love, Loss, and Friendship 4 stars only because I wished it had jumped around less.


message 3: by Shirley (new)

Shirley | 42 comments I read two books in May both were very good reads:
1. Chiaverini, Jennifer—The Aloha Quilt. Finished 5/11/10. Rating 10; fiction. Elm Creek Quilter Bonnie Markham joins her friend Claire in Hawaii to help Claire set up a quilters’ retreat at a bed and breakfast. Bonnie is in the midst of a messy divorce from Craig who continues to cause problems including threatening to take half of Bonnie’s ownership in Elm Creek Quilts. Bonnie has difficulty accepting that Claire had had an affair several years ago, but later realizes that Claire is a true friend. The book includes information on Hawaiian quilts (makes the ones made by a friend even more interesting) and Hawaiian history (especially interesting is the fascinating crazy Queen’s Quilt made by Queen Liliuokalani made during her house imprisonment in her Iolani Palace in 1895. She had done all she could to prevent the annexation of Hawaii by the United States after the overthrow of the Hawaiian monarchy. In the end she was unjustly convicted of being a part of a royalist plot.)
2.Piccoult, Jodi—House Rules. Finished 5/22/10. Rating 10; fiction. Read with Book Buddies. Jacob Hunt is accused of murdering his tutor Jess and admits to setting up the crime scene. Jacob has Asperger’s Syndrome and has a fixation with forensics science. The trial is rather frustrating as no one asks him what really happened.


JoAnn/QuAppelle | 1608 comments Mod
Shirley wrote: "2.Piccoult, Jodi—House Rules. Finished 5/22/10. Rating 10; fiction. Read with Book Buddies. Jacob Hunt is accused of murdering his tutor Jess and admits to setting up the crime scene. Jacob has Asperger’s Syndrome and has a fixation with forensics science. The trial is rather frustrating as no one asks him what really happened.
"


Well, it is a Picoult book --- and she is never concerned with reality, just how to manipulate the plot so she gets to the ending she wants.


JoAnn/QuAppelle | 1608 comments Mod
Shirley, what is a Hawaiin quilt?

I remember Queen Liliuokalani from James Michener's Hawaii which I read eons ago. What a great story.


message 6: by Louise (new)

Louise | 7 comments I spent my weekend reading Elizabeth George's latest book, "This Body of Death." I'm a fan of DI Lyndley and Barbara Havers, and I was glad to find him back at work after the death of his wife even though he is assisting a woman who is hoping to be assigned to his old post and not in charge. The story is, as always with George, full of twists and turns, lots of characters and interesting background in England. It kept my interest for the almost 700 pages even though it could have been tightened and not been quite so long. I hope the Masterpiece Mysteries group will dramatize it as they have done so many others of George's.


message 7: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) JoAnn/QuAppelle wrote: "Well, it is a Picoult book --- and she is never concerned with reality, just how to manipulate the plot so she gets to the ending she wants. ..."
---------------------------------

I enjoyed House Rules, too. I found it to be a real page turner.

At trial a lawyer wouldn't ask a question he didn't know the answer to in court. The lawyer wouldn't ask before the trial, because if the client said yes, he couldn't represent him, as he can't lie to the court. Also with Aspergers, Jacob was too literal to get a answer from. Can't say more on that last point, w/o spoilers.


House RulesJodi Picoult


message 8: by Shirley (new)

Shirley | 42 comments A Hawaiian quilt uses applique which usually is the largest part of the quilt. The pattern is made from folded paper to create a symmetrical design. They are often only two colors and are quite dramatic. I haven't tried one yet. Wikipedia has some examples and explanation of the quilting.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hawaiian...


JoAnn/QuAppelle | 1608 comments Mod
Louise wrote: "It kept my interest for the almost 700 pages even though it could have been tightened and not been quite so long. I hope the Masterpiece Mysteries group will dramatize it as they have done so many others of George's. ."

I used to listen to George's books on cassettes because they were abridged and that was the only way I could get through her books, which I always thought were too wordy. But now with books on DVD, they are no longer abidged for some reason.

I also liked the Lynley series on TV and wonder if, now that there are 3 or 4 books that have not been dramatized, a new series will start. I sure hope so.


message 10: by JoAnn/QuAppelle (new)

JoAnn/QuAppelle | 1608 comments Mod
Alias Reader wrote: "At trial a lawyer wouldn't ask a question he didn't know the answer to in court. The lawyer wouldn't ask before the trial, because if the client said yes, he couldn't represent him, as he can't lie to the court. Also with Aspergers, Jacob was too literal to get a answer from. ."

You have been watching too many legal shows on TV. LOL They contain lots of inaccuracies too. Maybe that is how Picoult gets her legal information.

What you wrote is not always the case, especially with a mentally challenged person. And someone else could have asked him (or already knew the answers to) these questions..not necessarily his lawyer. And then informed his lawyer.


message 11: by Sandi (new)

Sandi (sandin954) | 211 comments x-posted at M/T Reading Friends.

Had another good month of reading. I am back to a part time schedule at work so had plenty of time to read.

Top Reads

Shoot to Thrill by P.J. Tracy
Shoot to Thrill
P.J. Tracy
Finally, another Monkeewrench book and it did not disappoint. Very intriguing ending. Hopefully there won't be such a time gap between this book and the next.

Kickback/a Wyatt Novel by Garry Disher
Kickback/a Wyatt Novel
Garry Disher
Like Richard Stark's Parker only based in Australia.

Running Blind by Desmond Bagley
Running Blind
Desmond Bagley
Nifty Cold War thriller set in Iceland. Lots of action and a nicely done ending.

Good Reads

The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson
The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde
Robert Louis Stevenson
Classic tale of terror. Probably would have enjoyed it more if I had not been exposed to so many other variations of the story previously. Audio read by Scott Brick.

See Them Die (87th Precinct #13) by Ed McBain
See Them Die
Ed McBain
Another 87th Precinct novel from the 1960's.

This Body of Death An Inspector Lynley Novel by Elizabeth George
This Body of Death: An Inspector Lynley Novel
Elizabeth George
While not as good as some of the previous books in the series, a decent read though way too long. I see no reason why a mystery needs to be almost 700 pages.

Shiver (The Wolves of Mercy Falls, #1) by Maggie Stiefvater
Shiver
Maggie Stiefvater
A young adult fantasy. I liked the characters and storyline but there was a bit too much romance for my taste. Listened to the audio version read by Jenna Lamia (who sounds much younger than she is which was a bit disturbing) and David Ledoux.

Head First: A Yellowthread Street Mystery
William Marshall
One of my favorite police procedural series, set in Hong Kong a few years before the Chinese takeover.

Fables Storybook Love (Fables, #3) by Bill Willingham
Fables: Storybook Love
Bill Willingham
One of the few comic series I actually like. All of the fairy tale characters have been driven from their worlds and are now living in New York City.

Pay Days A Harpur & Iles Mystery by Bill James
Pay Days: A Harpur & Iles Mystery
Bill James
Another great entry in this English police series.

Bonecrack by Dick Francis
Bonecrack
Dick Francis
Entertaining racing mystery which focuses on father/son relationships.

The Other Side of Midnight by Sidney Sheldon
The Other Side of Midnight
Sidney Sheldon
Typical Sheldon potboiler ably read by Steven Pacey.

Road Rage Two Novellas "Duel" and "Throttle" by Joe Hill
Road Rage: Two Novellas: "Duel" and "Throttle"
Joe Hill
Stephen King
Richard Matheson
Special audio only version with Matheson's classic story "Duel" (which was made into a TV movie by Stephen Spielberg) and "Throttle" by Joe Hill and Stephen King. Both stories were very good though "Duel" was a bit less graphic. Read by Stephen Lang.

Enemies Within
Michael Z. Lewin
PI series set in Indianapolis. This book was published in 1974 so it was fun seeing how much the city has changed.

Running from the Law by Lisa Scottoline
Running from the Law
Lisa Scottoline
Legal thriller set in Philadelphia. Audio read by Barbara Rosenblat

Man in the Middle by Brian Haig
Man in the Middle
Brian Haig
Another fun thriller with JAG lawyer Sean Drummond who is working with the CIA in this book.

Not so Good

Made in Detroit by Paul Clemens
Made in Detroit
Paul Clemens
Boring memoir of a young man growing up in Detroit in the seventies/eighties.

My Life as a Man by Frederic Lindsay
My Life as a Man
Frederic Lindsay
Strange thriller set in Scotland.


message 12: by Sandi (new)

Sandi (sandin954) | 211 comments >>House Secrets: A Joe DeMarco Thriller<<

I've listened to the first two books in this series (The Inside Ring and The Second Perimeter) and really enjoyed both. I especially like the characters of Emma and The Speaker.


message 13: by Alias Reader (last edited May 31, 2010 03:48PM) (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) x- posted from Book Nook Cafe

Here are my May reads.


Barbara Mcclintock Pioneering Geneticist by Ray SpangenburgBarbara Mcclintock: Pioneering Geneticist by Ray Spangenburg
Rate: 3
Nonfiction
YA
This book is part of the Makers of Modern Science Series. I found it very informative. I hadn't heard of this pioneer and am glad I read the book.

House Rules by Jodi PicoultHouse Rules by Jodi Picoult
Rate: 4
Fiction
I found this to be quite a page turner.

Bounce Mozart, Federer, Picasso, Beckham, and the Science of Success by Matthew Syed Bounce: Mozart, Federer, Picasso, Beckham, and the Science of Success Matthew Syed
Nonfiction
Rate 3

My Life in France by Julia ChildMy Life in France by Julia Child
Rate 2
Nonfiction
I read this for a library group read. I wish there was more about living in France and less listing of menus and wine selection. I found parts to present Julia in not so nice manner. Her husband being put into a nursing home gets one line. Her father is also gets scant note upon his death. She says she is not a sentimental person. To me I found her cold. Perhaps that is the fault of the co-writer. She also doesn't tell her partner that she wrote the book with about the TV show she is doing in America. She got the show based on their joint book. She says she didn't think it was important. I found that to be intellectually dishonest. I would only recommend the book to real foodies and huge Julia fans.

Farm City The Education of an Urban Farmer by Novella CarpenterFarm City: The Education of an Urban Farmer by Novella Carpenter
Nonfiction
Rate: 2 plus


message 14: by JoAnn/QuAppelle (new)

JoAnn/QuAppelle | 1608 comments Mod
Sandi wrote: ">>House Secrets: A Joe DeMarco Thriller<<

I've listened to the first two books in this series (The Inside Ring and The Second Perimeter) and really enjoyed both. I especially like the characters of Emma and The Speaker. .."


Lawson's characters really jump off the pages, I think. I just started the new book and can already tell that I am going to be up late tonight!


message 15: by JoAnn/QuAppelle (new)

JoAnn/QuAppelle | 1608 comments Mod
Alias Reader wrote: "I found parts to present Julia in not so nice manner. Her husband being put into a nursing home gets one line. Her father is also gets scant note upon his death. She says she is not a sentimental person. To me I found her cold. Perhaps that is the fault of the co-writer. She also doesn't tell her partner that she wrote the book with about the TV show she is doing in America. She got the show based on their joint book. She says she didn't think it was important. I found that to be intellectually dishonest. I would only recommend the book to real foodies and huge Julia fans.."

I do not remember having this same reaction, but do remember taking the book with a huge grain of salt because it was actually written after her death and she had no editorial voice in the final product.


message 16: by Schmerguls (new)

Schmerguls | 257 comments What I Read in May 2010

4703 (captured) by history One Man's Vision of Our Tumultuous Century, by John Toland (read 1 May 2010) This is Toland's autobiography, published in 1997.. He was born in 1912, and his account of his early life is fascinating. He grew up in Connecticut, finished high school and then decided he should attend Phillips Exeter, and Williams College. He earned all the money needed for his education himself, getting no help from his father. He wanted to be a writer, but not till he was 42 did he succeed, and then only with non-fiction. I read his The Rising Sun, an account of the war with Japan, told from the standpoint of the Japanese, with great interest on 13 May 1973. I also read his book, No Man's Land 1918 The Last Year of the Great War, finishing it 10 Dec 1980 and it too is a great book and was much appreciated by me. He discusses all the books he wrote, and tells how hard he worked on them. Some of the book apparently uses stuff he did not get into the books he wrote.

4704 World Enough and Time A Romantic Novel. by Robert Penn Warren (read 5 May 2010) Because I so much enjoyed Warren's All the King's Men when I read it in 1958 and because I recently read a history of Kentucky which told of the most interesting times in that state in about 1820, and because this novel is laid in that time period, I decided to read it. The part of this book which touches on exciting politics is of interest. as is the account of Jeremiah Beaumont killing Colonel Fort and the subsequent trial. There actually was such an event, and such a trial (well described in a Wikipedia article: "Beauchamp-Sharp Tragedy"). However the novel is not true to the facts of history. There are many pages in the book which are boring, and the outcome is depressing. I think the novel would have been better if it had hewed more closely to the truth.

4705 To Hell and Back, by Audie Murphy (read 7 May 2010) This 1949 book was listed as one of the five best books describing war as soldiers know it. (The others: The Face of Battle, by John Keegan (read by me 21 Jan 2003); The Great War and Modern Memory, by Paul Fussell (read 14 Aug 1996); The Last Stand of the Tin Can Sailors, by James D. Hornfischer (read 22 Sep 2007), and The Forgotten Soldier, by Guy Sajer (read 1 Sep 1994). Murphy was the most decorated U.S. soldier in World War Two, receiving the Medal of Honor and 32 other U.S. medals. He fought in Sicily, Italy, and France, and all his exploits were accomplished before he was 21. (He lied about his age to get in the Army.) The book, which was ghost-written for him, tells the story of his war well. Everybody he started with in his outfit died or was seriously wounded. He began as a buck private and ended up as a lieutenant. After the war he was a movie star and played himself in the move made of his book.

4706 In the Name of Honor A Novel, by Richard North Patterson (read 10 May 2010) I had read two books by Richard North Patterson and both were good reading. This is his newest book and tells of an Iraq veteran who shoots his fellow officer. His defense is related to post traumatic stress. I thought the first half of the book was slow-moving but the second half, dealing with the court-martial is extremely well-done. The plot was of extreme interest, with an ending not many will have foreseen--I sure didn't. A good book.

4707 Speaker Nancy Pelosi and the New American Politics, by Ronald M. Peters, Jr. [and:] Cindy Simon Rosenthal (read 12 May 2010) This is a 2010 book by two University of Oklahoma political science professors. They examine the speakership of Pelosi, right up to about two months ago. They give her high marks for her efforts and demonstrate that she has been a better Speaker than her predecessors.. While her career is sketched, this is not a biography so much as a study of her career. It is clear she is a very hard worker and has a tough job since Democrats in the house are so ideologically diverse. The beginning of the book was a bit heavy on political science jargon but the book improved mightily when relating recent events and showing Pelosi's very real ability.

4708 The Dead Hand The Untold Story of the Cold War Arms Race and Its Dangerous Legacy, by David E. Hoffman (read 16 May 2010) (Pulitzer Nonfiction prize in 2010) This is an account of Gorbachev and Reagan and their dealings with each other, and shows Reagan in a better light than most Republicans in regard to wanting to end the arms race, though in his insistence on Star Wars at Reykjavik he may have delayed the end of the Cold War unnecessarily. But the account of those years is unfailingly exciting. The Dead Hand was a Soviet procedure for automatic nuclear retaliation even if no human gave a go ahead for such retaliation! And the book is really scary in telling of the great danger that still exists because of all the nuclear stuff still existing--between 2200 and 1700 warheads "operationally deployed" on each side still as of 2012! The account of the biological war efforts by Russia was unpleasant reading and scary but all the rest of the book was great reading.

4709 Kaleidoscope thirteen stories and novelettes by Stefan Zweig Translated by Eden and Cedar Paul (read 17 May 2010) The stories in this book are well-done, thought-provoking, and worth reading though they give no final definitive reading. Possibly the best story is "The Burning Secret" which tells of a 12-year-old boy who unwittingly saves his mother from tumbling into adultery. I have read ten books by or about Stefan Zweig, who with his wife committed suicide in Brazil in 1942 because he thought the world was in such dire straits.

4710 The Case of the Missing Books A Mobile Library Mystery, by Ian Sansom (read 19 May 2010) This is a 2005 book dubbed a mystery but in actuality is a farce telling of Israel Armstrong, who leaves London to be the librarian at a North Ireland library. When he gets to the town the library is closed and all its books are gone. I laughed a lot, though the story is inelegant and the central character is non-admirable and a dope. I was glad to get to the non-exciting end.

4711 The Man Who Once Was Whizzer White A Portrait of Justice Byron R. White, by Dennis J. Hutchinson (read 23 May 2010) This is a splendidly-written biography. The author was a law clerk for Justice White in 1975. The first two-thirds of the book is about White's life before he went on the Supreme Court in 1962 (with no prior judicial experience), and is just as interesting as his life on the Court. The book is unfailingly absorbing reading, and portrays White in an objective way--much about White is admirable, though he was crusty and made little effort to be gracious --as Justice Rawlings told me long ago when he met Justice White. I have not read a more interesting book this year.

4712 tinkers, by Paul Harding (read 25 May 2010) (Pulitzer fiction prize in 2010) Since I have read every Pulitzer fiction winner, I had to read this too. It is a jumbled up mess, telling of an old man in Maine dying, with flashbacks to his and his father's and grandfather's lives. It talked a lot about clocks and I imagine a clock maker would be intrigued by the book but I never got interested in anything the book talked about and was glad to get to the last page. Well-written but totally non-absorbing so far as I was concerned.

4713 The Battle for America 2008 The Story of an Extraordinary Election, by Dan Balz and Haynes Johnson (read 27 May 2010) Even though I read Game Change (on 25 Feb 2010) when I saw this book I knew I had to read it. even though its subject is the same as the subject of Game Change--the 2008 presidential election. Great presidential elections don't happen often, and 2008 was such a satisfying election that I knew I would enjoy the book--and I did. It tells the whole story of the campaigns leading up to determination of the candidates and then of the Obama-McCain contest. Clearly, Iowa was most significant for Obama getting the nomination, and McCain's goofy behavior when the economy threatened to collapse in September 2008 plus the farcical pick of a vice-presidential candidate by McCain were determinative of the outcome in Nov 2008. I enjoyed every page of this book even though I don't think I learned much new. It was more fun than living through the campaign since I knew all came out right in the end--which I did not know as I was living through it.

4714 The Millennium of Europe, by Oscar Halecki (read 31 May 2010) (John Gilmary Shea prize for 1963) This is the 8th winner of the Shea prize I have read. It is a carefully-written account of what the author calls the second Christian millennium, extending from about 967 to 1963. As I started the book it seemed it might be a bit heavy, but it improved as it went on, and is a good survey of the times covered. The author is kind of doleful at the end, fearing that the struggle against Soviet Communism might not end by century's end. He died in 1973, so did not see on this earth the great events of 1989, but no doubt rejoiced over them in a better place. A good book.

Like all months, May had its ups and downs.


message 17: by Connie (new)

Connie (constants) | 49 comments Official Book Club Selection - Kathy Griffin. I didn't know too much about Kathy Griffin and by the end of this book, based on what I learned, I didn't care for her very much. I thought that her early life was interesting, especially her struggles to succeed in her career. But once she did succeed, I liked her less and less and found her story less and less interesting. She did write an honest memoir, but I'm still not a fan. And I did not understand the inclusion of her correspondence with Steve Wozniak which, I will admit, I mostly skimmed over. B-

Mean Little deaf Queer - Terry Galloway. This was the 8th memoir I've read so far this year and I think that's why I didn't enjoy it as much as I expected I would - I'm just "tired" of real people, and ready to read about some imaginary ones! Galloway has an interesting story to tell, about struggling with her hearing disability and with her emerging sexuality and she has some unique insights into living a life with those two "strikes" against her. She's quite funny, not bitter, and has been successful in life. I think I just need a break from the genre. B

Scent of Rain and Lightning - Nancy Pickard. A mystery set in a small Kansas town where, one dark and stormy night a shot rings out (no kidding!) and the son of a prominent local rancher is killed, and the son's wife vanishes. There are enough suspects to fill a week of TV mysteries, but even the characters who aren't suspects are well-drawn and interesting. I did not figure out "whodunit" and I liked that about this book. A-

Plainsong - Kent Haruf. I thought I read this years ago, but it seemed completely new to me this time, so either I didn't read it before, or my memory is worse than I thought it was. The lives of a handful of residents of the small town of Holt, Colorado are interwoven during the course of one year in this simple, but compelling story. There are good people, confused folks, evildoers, mixed up kids, troubled women, taciturn old-timers, and very good storytelling to put them all together. A-


message 18: by Louise (new)

Louise | 7 comments Loved your comment about being tired of "real people" and ready to read about imaginary ones. True in "real life" too.


message 19: by Sandi (new)

Sandi (sandin954) | 211 comments >>4710 The Case of the Missing Books A Mobile Library Mystery, by Ian Sansom (read 19 May 2010) This is a 2005 book dubbed a mystery but in actuality is a farce telling of Israel Armstrong, who leaves London to be the librarian at a North Ireland library. When he gets to the town the library is closed and all its books are gone. I laughed a lot, though the story is inelegant and the central character is non-admirable and a dope. I was glad to get to the non-exciting end.
<<

I had the same reaction to this book as you. The main character pretty much got on my last nerve and I thought the plotting and pacing were not executed all that well. Too bad, because the concept sounded like it would make an entertaining and quirky mystery.


message 20: by Suep (new)

Suep | 15 comments Dang! I thought I read more than just two books last month but then again, the Giro de Italia was on and I had to watch! Oh, and I almost forgot the Stanley Cup playoffs too. Sigh.....busy month, indeed.

The 19th Wife by David Ebershoff- Pretty good read; Mormon history combined with present day murder mystery. A little dry/long in places.

Every Last One by Anna Quindlen- Good read; "Don't know what you have until it's gone theme".


message 21: by Alison (new)

Alison (alisoncohen) | 32 comments Sandi wrote: ">>4710 The Case of the Missing Books A Mobile Library Mystery, by Ian Sansom (read 19 May 2010) This is a 2005 book dubbed a mystery but in actuality is a farce telling of Israel Armstrong, who lea..."

Too much concept, not enough story.


Carolyn (in SC) C234D | 123 comments In May I read:

The Dive from Clausen's Pier, by Ann Packer. Good story about a young woman whose fiance is paralyzed after a dive, and how she coped.

The Last Temptation, by Val McDermid. Good series thriller about Chief Inspector Carol Jordan, going deep undercover in Germany in an effort to catch a drug dealer/human trafficker, and Dr. Tony Hill, a profiler who is developing a profile on a serial killer who has victims in Holland and Germany. Intense as always.

Mrs. Pringle of Fairacre, by Miss Read. My first Miss Read book, but it should not be my last. Not dramatic or plot-driven, just a nice story about people in a small English village. Provides a break between heavier books or mystery/thrillers.

Taming A Sea-Horse, by Robert B. Parker. The 13th Spenser novel. This is a series that I enjoy a lot, about the wise-cracking, violent, but honorable private eye.


message 23: by Schmerguls (new)

Schmerguls | 257 comments Carolyn, I note what you say about Spenser in the 13th book of the series. I read the first one and said of it:

3038 The Godwulf Manuscript, by Robert B. Parker (read 28 Nov 1997) This is Parker's first book. He is a student of Dashiell Hammett and Raymond Chandler--his book is designed to be of the same kind. The hard-boiled detective, Spenser, is hired to check into the theft of a manuscript and there is quickly a murder, and then another, and Spenser kills three people who try to kill him. There is a grotesque and unnecessary day when Spenser has sex with both a mother and daughter--I thought those episodes were stupid and added nothing to the story. The action is fast-paced, violent, and Spenser is a tough cookie. I can't say I did not find the book easy and enjoyable to read, though I'm not sure I will read more by Parker. [And I never have, so far.:]

He wasn't very honorable in the first one and I am glad he has improved since then


message 24: by Peg (new)

Peg I think you are missing the point of Elizabeth George's Inspector Linley series. The mystery is more than a side note yes, but it is the personal lives of the characters that is so wonderful to see continuing. Ending one of her stories is like having the annual visit with good friends be over and wondering what is going on with them once you are apart.


message 25: by JoAnn/QuAppelle (last edited Jun 04, 2010 01:31PM) (new)

JoAnn/QuAppelle | 1608 comments Mod
Peg wrote: "I think you are missing the point of Elizabeth George's Inspector Linley series. The mystery is more than a side note yes, but it is the personal lives of the characters that is so wonderful to see continuing..."

I assume this was directed at me (and perhaps Louise) because I said that I thought George's Lynley books were too wordy.

Well, despite the (author-approved BTW) abridgments, I still got a full and ongoing picture of the personal lives of the characters. It's not like everything was left out except the mystery!!!!

I certainly did NOT miss the point of the series, but thanks anyway for trying to correct/educate me.


message 26: by Peg (new)

Peg It is a mute point to discuss whether you missed something or not reading/listening to the abridged version vs. the full version. Since I didn't do both, I don't know what was left out to know if you truly did miss out on something you might have enjoyed. And on the other hand, nor can you.

I think the mystery (and this is my opinion, Joanne, not a correction/education) is the conduit to getting to know the characters. The stories could be set in a shopping district with everyone owning or working in a different shop. A mystery can be more exciting and tension filling than a simple story plot.

As for wordy books, you and I have always differed on that point. I love books that are full of descriptions. In fact Let the Great World Spin was my favorite of last year. I loved the way Colum McCann took the space of a paragragh filling it with descriptive words to described one thing. This literary device was brilliant, magnificent and awesome - one that truly made my jaw drop. However, I know you wouldn't have liked it at all - which is okay as well.


message 27: by JoAnn/QuAppelle (new)

JoAnn/QuAppelle | 1608 comments Mod
Peg wrote: "It is a mute point to discuss whether you missed something or not reading/listening to the abridged version vs. the full version. Since I didn't do both, I don't know what was left out to know if ..."

It is not really a moot point because before I discovered the abridged audios, I labored through several of her books. And believe me, her abridged audios were still full of descriptions about place, the characters, their inner lives, their motivations, etc....... just not as wordy.

As for the McCann book, I read the first story and thought that despite all the words, the characters were poorly developed. If an author is going to use all those words, he could at least do that. Maybe he did that later on in the book, but I was not willing to slog through any more of his writing to see if that happened. Yes, there were wonderfully descriptive passages if you like that sort of thing, but the characters were not developed enough to make me care at all about them. This is IMHO

And I do feel that you were attempting to "correct/educate" me when you said "I think you are missing the point of Elizabeth George's Inspector Linley series." When I was a teacher, had I said that to a student, that is exactly what I would have been doing and exactly the perception the student would have.


message 28: by Meredith (new)

Meredith | 54 comments My May reads were

Cutwork Monica Ferris A cozy mystery with an amatuer(sP?) sleuth who owns a needlework shop. Light and fast read.
The Terra Cotta Dog Andrea Camilleri A translation of an Iaalian mystery, whose protagonist is a police detective. This story had elements of art hisory, world war II era story.
The Knitting Circle Ann Hood This was a semiautobiographical novel about how a group strangers in a Kknitting crcle help the main character learn how to move on with her life after the death of her child,
Crewel Yule Monica Ferris Another needlework cozy mytery
The Girl Who Played With Fire Steig Larson The second book of the Millenium Trilogy. I found this book to be a great thriller.
Embroidered Truths Monica Ferris Another needlework cozy

Meredith


message 29: by JoAnn/QuAppelle (new)

JoAnn/QuAppelle | 1608 comments Mod
Meredith in case I have not mentioned it, I would highly recommend Ann Hood's latest book,

The Red Thread: A Novel

it was excellent.


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