Victorians! discussion

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Conversations in the Parlor > Victorian/19th Century Transportation

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message 1: by Silver (new)

Silver One of the interesting things I have noticed via reading Victorian literature (and books from the 19th century in general) is what a wide variety of different types of carriages they had, and how many different styles and names there were for carriages there were.

It is something that I never really took the time to contemplate on, but it seems that they had almost as many different models of carriages, as we have cars today.

It is also interesting that in the same way we have different types of cars which serve different types of purposes, there were the sports car version of carriages, that were light weight and fast, and the SUV version, that were made to accommodate several people.

At one point it seemed like in one single book at least 5 different types of carriages were mentioned through the course of the novel at various different points.

Though now I cannot recall off the top of my head all the different names for the many types of carriages I have encountered in my reading.


The Book Whisperer (aka Boof) | 736 comments That's not something I have ever really paid much attention to to be honest, but it does make absolute sense.

The only time I've weeped over anything carriage-y in a book was Black Beauty - oh so sad!


message 3: by Silver (new)

Silver Yes Black Beauty was quite sad!


message 4: by Everyman (new)

Everyman | 2507 comments Silver wrote: "One of the interesting things I have noticed via reading Victorian literature (and books from the 19th century in general) is what a wide variety of different types of carriages they had, and how m..."

Yes, it makes perfect sense. Just like cars today, carriages then were, for those who could afford them, status symbols. And just as we have cars for one or two, and people movers for families, they had the same. There had to be carriages adapted for city streets, and carriages able to handle rutted country lanes in as much comfort as a squire's family could hope for. And of course carriages had to serve the tasks of buses and taxicabs today.

All in all, their needs and wants for carriages were very similar to our needs and wants for cars.


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