Existentialism discussion

968 views
Favorite Existential Movie?

Comments Showing 1-50 of 52 (52 new)    post a comment »
« previous 1

message 1: by Winslow (new)

Winslow Taylor | 2 comments Hm I like this question. Let me give my top 3.

Pierrot le fou- Godard
The Seventh Seal- Bergman
Fantastic Mr. Fox- Anderson

Yes, I like to consider the 3rd as well... heh.


message 2: by Ali (new)

Ali (ali7) | 3 comments The Silence - Ingmar Bergman
Through a Glass Darkly - Ingmar Bergman
WR: Mysteries of the Organism - Dusan Mekavejev
The Holy Mountain - Alejandro Jodorowsky
Fando and Lis - Alejandro Jodorowsky


message 3: by Monica (new)

Monica | 8 comments Blowup - Michelangelo Antonioni
Performance - Donald Cammell
The Unbearable Lightness of Being - Philip Kaufman


message 4: by Ali (new)

Ali (ali7) | 3 comments Mentioning Michaelangelo Antonioni, "La Notte" and "The Passenger" hold some existentialist connotations.


message 5: by Ali (last edited Sep 30, 2010 07:59AM) (new)

Ali (ali7) | 3 comments Francis Ford Coppola's "Apocalypse Now" and Akira Kurosawa's "Ikiru"


message 6: by [deleted user] (new)

I find categorizing philosophers of the past as existentialist can sometimes be confusing. I think Sartre was one of the first to categorize himself as one.

Favourite movies

The Unbearable Lightness of Being
HIgh Noon -John Wayne thought it was very unAmerican. Bill Clinton loved it.

What do you think about "Mash" and "Catch 22" Do they fit well enough.


message 7: by Greg (new)

Greg | 2 comments Taxi Driver- Watched it last night...its very good for this subject.


message 8: by Samar (new)

Samar | 1 comments my fav existentialism movies :
1- fight club
2- american beauty


message 9: by Emisa (last edited Apr 24, 2011 08:27PM) (new)

Emisa Rista recently i've seen "Un Homme Qui dort". very good indeed.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Un_homme...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xp9Y0M...


message 10: by [deleted user] (new)

My favorite existentialist films are typically crime films in which the crime is merely a representation of an attitude toward life. Films that immediately come to mind are

Melville's Le Samourai
John Boorman's Point Blank
Jacques Tourneur's Out of the Past


message 11: by Rob the Obscure (new)

Rob the Obscure Reading this list raises the obvious question: what the fuck is an existentialist movie?

Don't say, "a movie with an existentialist theme", which begs the same question.


message 12: by Rob the Obscure (new)

Rob the Obscure Yeah, but can someone answer my question?


message 13: by Jimmy (new)

Jimmy | 85 comments I can't answer your excellent question, Mr. Obscure, but here is a site with some sample "existential movies." I'm not sure it will help because it didn't help me.

http://www.existential-therapy.com/Ar...


message 14: by Jimmy (new)

Jimmy | 85 comments Here is an attempted answer to the question:

http://www.existential-therapy.com/Ar...


message 15: by Rob the Obscure (new)

Rob the Obscure Jimmy - did you find that definition helpful?


message 16: by Jimmy (new)

Jimmy | 85 comments no


message 17: by Rob the Obscure (new)

Rob the Obscure Me either


message 18: by Jimmy (new)

Jimmy | 85 comments I just turned on the tv and Waking Life by Richard Linklater is on. I'm surprised no one has mentioned it yet. I won't be so bold as to call it an existential movie, but it is . . . well . . . an interesting picture.

http://www.foxsearchlight.com/wakingl...


message 19: by Rob the Obscure (new)

Rob the Obscure If one really thinks about the philosophical premises behind existentialism, I think most movies could be classified as one.


message 20: by Jimmy (new)

Jimmy | 85 comments My thought was that ALL movies were existential. The writer in the sites I posted said,

"Do all movies deal with these themes? Maybe, depending upon what level of trivialization you are willing to accept. In my view, clearly the answer is “no.” I am confident that most, if not all, people who approach existentialism with seriousness would agree with this answer. So when someone asks “Aren’t all movies existential?” first, check to see if they are just trying to sound intelligent or trivialize existentialism. If so, there is little use for the conversation to continue. If this question is approached with seriousness, then it may be best to place existentialism in its historical and intellectual context to answer the question."

He does not convince me.


message 21: by Rob the Obscure (new)

Rob the Obscure The problem with that writer is that his essential message is this: "if you don't agree that some movies and are existential movies and some aren't, then you are trivializing existentialism and don't really understand it."

That's bullshit. I think it's him that doesn't fully understand it.


message 22: by Jimmy (new)

Jimmy | 85 comments Here's a philosophical question for you all: What do Attila the Hun, Kermit the Frog, and Rob the Obscure all have in common?


message 23: by Rob the Obscure (new)

Rob the Obscure Weird names?


message 24: by Jimmy (new)

Jimmy | 85 comments The same middle name.


message 25: by Rob the Obscure (new)

Rob the Obscure I was close


message 26: by Jimmy (new)

Jimmy | 85 comments Only counts in horseshoes.


message 27: by Rob the Obscure (new)

Rob the Obscure Also counts in existential contemplation


message 29: by [deleted user] (new)

Cars seems to inspire existentialist attitudes:

Vanishing Point
Two-Lane Blacktop
The Driver


message 30: by Feliks (last edited Nov 01, 2013 03:31PM) (new)

Feliks (dzerzhinsky) Matt wrote: "What is everyone's favorite Existential movie?"


The Trial (Orson Welles version)
Fritz Lang's 'M'
Fritz Lang's 'Fury'
Elio Petri's 'Investigation of a Citizen Above Suspicion'
Godard's "Alphaville"
Resnais' "Last Year at Marienbad"
Lumet's "The Hill"
Chaplin's "Modern Times"
"Figures in a Landscape"
Lindsay Anderson's "If..."
Lindsay Anderson's "O! Lucky Man!"
Chris Marker's "La Jettee"
Durenmatt's "The Visit"
Ibsen's "An Enemy of the People"
Pontecorvo's "The Battle of Algiers"
Fellini's "8 1/2" or "La Dolce Vita"
Bertolucci's "The Conformist"
Coppola's "The Conversation"
Kubrick's "Paths of Glory"
Hemmings' "Power Play"
Elio Petri's "The Tenth Victim"
Frankenheimer's "Seconds"
Kazan's "The Arrangement"
Polanski's "A Pure Formality"
Donen's "Mirage"
"The Prisoner" (tv series)
Jewison's "Rollerball"
Lucas' "THX-1138"
"Death-Watch"
"Woman in the Dunes"


message 31: by Feliks (last edited Oct 30, 2013 09:42PM) (new)

Feliks (dzerzhinsky) Rob the Obscure wrote: "If one really thinks about the philosophical premises behind existentialism, I think most movies could be classified as one."

Only in the most vague sense. Movies are almost always oriented towards a practical and eager goal.

Rob the Obscure wrote: "Reading this list raises the obvious question: what the fuck is an existentialist movie?

Don't say, "a movie with an existentialist theme", which begs the same question."


Begging the question? Disagree. An existentialist movie production are films like those of Andy Warhol, who simply set his camera running for 8 hours on a single subject (man sleeping, Empire State Building) and left it running. Perhaps David Cammell as well. A few other weirdos.

Movies with existentialist themes (hardly any of them, existential since they usually have keen expectations they're trying to realize) are numerous, and I've listed some of the most memorable ones (to me) above.

No need to curse, btw.


message 32: by Dan's (last edited Oct 31, 2013 06:17AM) (new)

Dan's | 11 comments @ Feliks Amazing list you brought up there mate!

I would gladly add

-le charm discret de la bourgeoisie (the discreet charm of the bourgeoisie)
or even ~the phantomof liberty~ by the same director

I find the chance encounters that unfold the plot on the film paramount in sketching a few difficult themes, or as

Buñuel himself put it, outlines the film's themes in his autobiography as being:

The search for truth and the need to abandon the truth as soon as you have found it.
The implacable nature of social rituals.
The importance of coincidence.
The importance of personal morality.
The essential mystery of all things.

for a TV series I would add the post-apocalyptic ~Jericho~ [that was shot in only 2 periods, discontinued why due to ~raising Publics awareness in GOV "monkey businees"]
But I think its mostly relevant to the search for self of one the key chars travelling back to his home-town, by chance? in their time of need.


message 33: by Dan's (new)

Dan's | 11 comments Feliks wrote: "Matt wrote: "What is everyone's favorite Existential movie?""

Why did U add those 3 movies in particular?

Resnais' "Last Year at Marienbad" (again I was late in a screening, but I did "ãdhere this movies message in a subconscious way, quite experimental in scripting-progeressing)

Lumet's "The Hill" ( Ιve seen SS I must see the whole movie stm soon)

Chaplin's "Modern Times"

Lindsay Anderson's "If..."

but again why those last 2 movies _?_ especially ~ΙF~ did U think that Malcolm Mc Dowell's role embodied the inner drive-incentive of most students in that era for a permanent change \ radical imminent change


message 34: by Feliks (last edited Oct 31, 2013 12:57PM) (new)

Feliks (dzerzhinsky) Hey! You guys pose interesting questions. This group has merit. I'm liking this discussion, I see mental processes at work!

H'mm..let me see.. the three titles you (Dan) are 'testing'. I'm fully open to this, by the way. Maybe they don't fit as well as they ought! But to defend my impulse to include them I think I'd offer these explanations:

Lindsay Anderson's "If.."
~shows a group of students becoming disillusioned with the deeply latent 'military programme' of the school/school town around them. The movie shows their doubts causing them to unravel in all sorts of slight ways, until it snowballs in a nihilistic finale. They can't possibly win but they launch the attack anyway. That's what triggered me to include it. Atavism, the way they removed themselves from the 'cyclical roles' and arrangements ordered for them. They 'got off the train', as it were.

Resnais' 'Marienbad'. I included it for this reason:
~the movie's structure. Its an endless loop which can be entered anywhere and exited anywhere, its the same story at any point. The filming matches the narrative, which is also looping and 'goal-less'. The characters realize they are constantly repeating a sequence over and over and the characters embrace it and find salvation in it.

Chaplin's 'Modern Times'
~A figure intent on retaining his personal tradition in opposition to a vast programme which has (in effect) completely taken over the external world around him. As long as he remains within the city, he is locked in a combat with technology, innovation, change, and really time itself. The tramp is standing still, and insists on standing still; even though he must realize how hopeless it is.

Sidney Lumet's 'The Hill' (one of my all-time favorites)
~included because the men's lives as prisoners, are utterly closed-ended and hopeless. They can never get to the top of the hill and find a changed system, inside the prison. Yet, the lead character knows he has chosen the life which upholds the system. He even defends the hierarchy at the same time he battles it--though he knows it means his personal destruction. The movie is a story about a series of fluke accidents where it seems they might actually change the status quo...

In short, almost all of these movies reveal characters assuming responsibility for themselves, implementing their own moral judgment as opposed to relying or trusting in the 'systems' they find themselves in.


message 35: by Dan's (new)

Dan's | 11 comments ΩΩωω Ι Have to take a closer look on what U propose- anwer, to reply more adequately... - some gaps on my memory banks on 2 of those movies..!


message 36: by Feliks (last edited Nov 01, 2013 03:32PM) (new)

Feliks (dzerzhinsky) Very good pick, whoever chose 'The Passenger'. Love that flick!

From my own list, I would probably drop 'Ministry of Fear'. I think I dis-remembered the plot when I included it. Yeah...removing it.


message 37: by Rob the Obscure (new)

Rob the Obscure OK...my favorite existential movie is Castaway On The Moon. Second is Lost In Translation. Or maybe that's first. I don't know. I can't remember all of the 100s of existential movies I've seen.

Sorry, Feliks, for the cursing. I guess I just don't have my shit together.


message 38: by Feliks (new)

Feliks (dzerzhinsky) Fair enough. We all have careless moments. Good on ye mate.


message 39: by Jimmy (new)

Jimmy | 85 comments I just watched the Russian film Russian Ark. All shot in one 96-minute uncut swoop. I was totally enthralled by it. Here's an interesting story about the movie by Roger Ebert.

http://www.rogerebert.com/reviews/rus...


message 40: by Rob the Obscure (new)

Rob the Obscure Jimmy wrote: "I just watched the Russian film Russian Ark. All shot in one 96-minute uncut swoop. I was totally enthralled by it. Here's an interesting story about the movie by Roger Ebert.

http://www.rogerebe..."


Jimmy - is it an existential movie? Or just a non-existential movie? (grin)

Is it available on Netflix streaming? Is that where you saw it?


message 41: by Rob the Obscure (new)

Rob the Obscure Just found it on Netflix. Added it to my existential list. Thanks for the recommendation.


message 42: by Jimmy (new)

Jimmy | 85 comments Saw it on Turner Classic movies. A very underrated station. The history of movies series they have been doing has been terrific. Late at night they do a lot of foreign films.


message 43: by Rob the Obscure (new)

Rob the Obscure Jimmy wrote: "Saw it on Turner Classic movies. A very underrated station. The history of movies series they have been doing has been terrific. Late at night they do a lot of foreign films."

So is it an existential movie, in your opinion?


message 44: by Jimmy (new)

Jimmy | 85 comments Haven't the foggiest.

It's just different, so I figured it belonged in this thread.


message 45: by Rob the Obscure (new)

Rob the Obscure Jimmy wrote: "Haven't the foggiest.

It's just different, so I figured it belonged in this thread."


(haha)

I understand


message 46: by Elly (new)

Elly Thompson | 7 comments I heart hukabees is a fun existentialist movie, but ingmar bergen's winter light is the best.


message 47: by Franklin (new)

Franklin Trejo | 1 comments Life of pi!


message 48: by [deleted user] (new)

Le Samourai


message 49: by Jimmy (new)

Jimmy | 85 comments Enduring Love.


message 50: by Daniel (new)

Daniel Velasco (Dr_Dan) | 1 comments Off the top of my head:

Lost in Translation.

Stranger Than Fiction.

Before Sunrise.

I don't know if I would categorize them as "existential" movies, but they do deal with existential themes on various levels.


« previous 1
back to top