Mystery/Thriller Reading Friends discussion

24 views
Monthly "Reads" > Shomeret's April Reads 3/3

Comments Showing 1-2 of 2 (2 new)    post a comment »
dateDown arrow    newest »

message 1: by Shomeret (new)

Shomeret | 1382 comments 9)The Coroner's Lunch by Colin Cotterill (mystery) 257 pages. Source: Library Started: 4/23 Finished: 4/23

Why Read: This was a selection of the F2F mystery group for April, but I didn't get it on time. I had it on hold and it came in a couple of weeks after the April meeting. I commented at the April meeting that I hadn't gotten The Coroner's Lunch because they must still be cooking it. The MC is a 72 year old coroner in Communist Laos who communicates with spirits. It's the communicating with spirits part that interests me.

Comments: The Coroner's Lunch was tasty. There were some very vivid characters and I loved the side plot about the Hmong village. There were spirits and dreams sent by spirits that needed to be interpreted. This makes them a very challenging source of clues in a mystery investigation. I felt that this book was really excellent on all levels. Rating A. This is the best book I read in April.

10)Daughters of the Witching Hill by Mary Sharratt (historical fiction) 333 pages. Source: Library Started: 4/24 Finished: 4/26

Why Read: This is about a visionary and healer in 17th century England who also has gifted grand children. I'm always interested in positive images of women practicing what is called witchcraft.

Comments: The MC is an actual historical witch and her practices are taken from the trial transcripts. She used Catholic prayers and folk magic which is authentic for the period. There have been some historical witchcraft novels where the practices appear to be drawn from modern Neo-Pagan sources. This book isn't one of them. It also has some amazing characters and relationships. Rating B+

11)Midnight Fires: A Mystery with Mary Wollstonecraft by Nancy Means Wright
(historical mystery) Source: Library Started: 4/26
Finished: 4/28

Why Read: The detective in this novel is the feminist writer Mary Wollstonecraft who is one of my abiding interests. This is the first in a series. I think it's realistic that she should investigate murders because she liked to help people and had a keen sense of justice.

Comments: I commented on the Historical Mysteries group that it started out like something out of Jane Eyre. That's because it deals with the part of Mary Wollstonecraft's life when she was a governess in Ireland. Jane Eyre only had to deal with a wife in the attic. The real governess Mary Wollstonecraft had to deal with murders, family problems and Irish revolutionaries. There were a number of sympathetic characters in this book, but almost all of them were Irish. Fortunately, I agree with the author's perspective on the political situation of the time. Mary Wollstonecraft is one of my favorite revolutionists. I will be delighted to read about more of her adventures. Rating B+

I only had one A rated book, but the B and B+ books were good reads. I'm very happy to read as many as 11 books at this point in my semester.


message 2: by Ann (new)

Ann (annrumsey) | 14711 comments Shomeret
Eleven books for the month looks great to me, especially when fit in with your Library school work!
Daughters of the Witching Hill particularly catches my eye, and The Coroner's Lunch does too. (though to stay in step I should say it tempts my palate!

Shomeret wrote: "9)The Coroner's Lunch by Colin Cotterill (mystery) 257 pages. Source: Library Started: 4/23 Finished: 4/23

... I commented at the April meeting that I hadn't gotten The Coroner's Lunch because they must still be cooking it. The MC is a 72 year old coroner in Communist Laos who communicates with spirits. It's the communicating with spirits part that interests me. Comments: The Coroner's Lunch was tasty.

10)Daughters of the Witching Hill by Mary Sharratt (historical fiction) 333 pages. Source: Library Started: 4/24 Finished: 4/26

Why Read: This is about a visionary and healer in 17th century England who also has gifted grand children. I'm always interested in positive images of women practicing what is called witchcraft. ."



back to top