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Thirteen Reasons Why
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Book Club Discussions > APRIL: Thirteen Reasons Why by Jay Asher

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Ashley (affie) | 468 comments The cassette tapes didn't bother me. I know a lot of kids in my college classes that used cassette tapes to record class lectures. If she was using something she found at home, I think it makes total sense. They are often a lot easier to use, and easier to access than the more advanced technology that's around, and probably easier for an average girl on her own to use.
I thought this book was incredible. There was so much pain in these pages. It really makes you look back on your own life, and hope and pray that your own stupid actions didn't contribute in any way to someone else feeling the way that this girl did.
I thought that Jay Asher did an amazing job putting emotion and suffering into these pages, making us take a look at life and what we thought we knew, all without coming across as preachy or even judgemental. Ryan, if you can get over the cassette tape thing, I definitely recommend giving this book a chance. It is amazing.


Mandy (mldavisreads) | 210 comments The author addressed the cassette t ape issue in the questions at the end of the book, he said it's hard to stay on top of changing technology but using technology that the characters admit is outdated makes the story age a little better. I thought that was an interesting point.

I listened to the book on audio, and if you haven't started it yet, I highly recommend the audio version. There are two narrators, one for Clay and one for Hannah, and it's a very gripping read.


Andrez (andrez-ssi) loved that book


Lydia (loverofinformation) | 596 comments What I loved most about the books was the flowing structure. It kept me riveted and wanting to know what else he was going to find out.

As a technology librarian, I don't expect books to be on top of technology. The changes tend to occur within 6 months. Publishing a book takes often more than a year.


Michelle (micnandec) I read this a while ago so sorry if my memory gets fuzzy. Regarding the cassette tape: I can completely see Hannah using one, especially if she is looking for stuff around the house and needed something that was portable to record in a private location. I even like how Clay had to go searching for a cassette player since it was out-dated tech. That made it more believable for me for some reason.
But regarding the reasons why Hannah did what she did: I just didn't buy it. That part felt fake or maybe it made Hannah seem like a drama-queen to me. Almost like that she was trying to be sleeping beauty in that she wanted her prince charming to save her or something. I still don't quite know, but in my eyes Hannah felt like a weak-spirited character.
I do want to note that I find it interesting that reviewers seem to either love or hate the book. There's seems to be very little middle ground.


Nancy | 5 comments I read this book because my students loved it (I'm a h.s. librarian)-- several were really touched by it and felt it changed their way of looking at other kids. I have had a waiting list for it, so I guess it is reaching its target audience. Teens can be so blind-sided when it comes to others' feelings and I thought it spoke to that problem well.


Gorana | 1 comments I'm listening to the audio book and I really got into the story... I love the narrator's voices and I think listening to the book made it come to life...i don't think that I would be having the same experience if i was reading it..
Cassette tapes don't bother me at all. It makes the story more interesting. Who cares if the tapes are not IN? If Hannah wanted she could've used something else, but she choose to record her voice on the tapes. :)


Donna (dfiggz) | 1332 comments I liked the idea of the tapes mayebe it's because I come from that era but the author explains why she used them and I did not have any issues with trhat.

I thought it was very interesting and I very much enjoyed it. AND of course I was hoping that the ending was different. Maybe I will speak of it soon I hate to be the first Spoiler!


Kathy  (readr4ever) | 342 comments I loved this book, thought the tapes were an excellent venue for Hannah's message. Of course, like Donna, maybe coming from the era of cassette tapes helps me identify with it more easily. I like the idea of pressing the stop button on the tape player, rewind, playing forward and all that.

I had just finished the book when the news started featuring the story of Phoebe Prince and her suicide due to bullying and harassment. Although Phoebe's and Hannah's stories are different (aside from the obvious of one being true and one being fiction), the underlying emotions are there in both. The saying that "sticks and stones can break my bones, but words will never hurt me," is clearly refuted. Words do hurt; words kill. Rumors and name-calling crush a young person just as solidly as stones. I think that Thirteen Reasons Why should be required reading and serve as an impetus for discussion in high schools. I've seen how teenagers hurt from the cruelty of rejection and isolation, and anyone serving these young people in education has responsibility to do better by them.

I really only have one area in the book that I would have liked to have had expanded upon a bit, and that area was Hannah's parents. I know that they weren't the focus here, but I would have liked to have known more about their involvement or lack of in Hannah's life. I'm guessing that their business took up most of their time and energy, but was there nothing that they gave Hannah in her despair?


Donna (dfiggz) | 1332 comments Of course with being a parent that is the first thing I thought too, but I kept telling myself that the books is not about them and that kinda helped.

I am so nervous about my kids being teens. I was (and still am) a strong person and I just hope that I pass that on to them.


Kathy  (readr4ever) | 342 comments Donna wrote: "Of course with being a parent that is the first thing I thought too, but I kept telling myself that the books is not about them and that kinda helped.

I am so nervous about my kids being teens...."


Being a strong person certainly will help, Donna. LOL! I'm sure that your example of strength will serve them well. I told my kids recently, son is 22 (soon to be 23) and daughter is 26, that I was so glad I didn't have to be a good example anymore. See, I can afford to take it lightly now that the teens are over with mine. Of course, my son is still in college and I'm not quite out of the woods there yet. I think one thing that will help with your kids (and helped with mine) is that we enjoy teen literature and so are constantly reading about what our teens go through, although I'm sure we don't know all of it. One of the aspects of my kids being teens that I enjoyed was their teenage friends. I thought my kids had great, interesting friends, but then, I find teens extremely interesting creatures.


message 12: by Jennifer W, WT Moderator (new) - rated it 4 stars

Jennifer W | 1289 comments Mod
I haven't read the above comments yet because I just started listening to this book. 20 or so minutes in, I was already hooked: why did she kill herself? why are these people (especially our main character) at fault? why send out the tapes? Unfortunately, my eyes were drooping, so I had to give it a break, but I can't wait to get out of work and start listening again.


Miss Bookiverse (missbookiverse) I loved the audiobook of this, Jennifer, it was so well done and it fit the story perfectly.


Donna (dfiggz) | 1332 comments I just hate bullying! I am so nervous about that but I really do believe that my children will be strong since both me and my husband are. We never let the little things bother us so I hope we pass that gene on but are children are still very youn (2 girls 2 years olf and 9 months)


Kathy  (readr4ever) | 342 comments There's an article in our newspaper today about bullies' parents often not recognizing that their children are bullies. I haven't read it yet, but I plan to read it when I eat lunch later. I'm curious how you don't realize that your kid is a bully. Of course, kids are great masters of disguise where parents are concerned.


message 16: by Hayes (last edited Apr 18, 2010 08:54AM) (new)

Hayes (hayes13) Kathy wrote: "There's an article in our newspaper today about bullies' parents often not recognizing that their children are bullies. I haven't read it yet, but I plan to read it when I eat lunch later. I'm cu..."

Hi Kathy... is it online? Could you post a link please? Fortunately my son is no longer having trouble, but in elementary school was the victim (along with 2 or 3 others) of terrible bullying. We reported it, but were told that 9 and 10 is too young for bullying (yeah, right) and that it was my son who was causing the trouble, not the other kids. Grrrrr....


Kathy  (readr4ever) | 342 comments Hayes, I googled the article and came up with this URL, http://www.deseretnews.com/article/70...

That just burns me up that the school would tell you 9 and 10 is too young for bullying. Where do these people get their training? Really! When my son was in 2nd grade, there were two cousins, one who would hold my son and the other who would hit him. The teachers were apparently too busy talking at recess to see this abuse and the principal told me that my son would be punished if we told him to protect himself and hit back. Nice, right? I mean, I don't like advocating violence, but I didn't want my son to be unable to protect himself. My husband, his father, told him what to do (how to get in the surprise punch) and the problem basically was solved. The school just turned a blind eye to the abuse. Luckily, my son was in a different school the next year.


message 18: by Hayes (new)

Hayes (hayes13) Kathy wrote: "Hayes, I googled the article and came up with this URL, http://www.deseretnews.com/article/70...

...my son would be punished if we told him to protect himself and hit back. Nice, right?..."


Thanks Kathy. That was basically what happened. He would take the nonsense and then would explode when he couldn't take it any longer and of course would get in trouble for being angry all the time...

He's now in middle school and while most of his old classmates are at the same school, the school did a very good job of separating them and putting them in different classes.

Back to the Chinese saying about waiting for your enemy's body to float down the river: at the end of 6th grade 2 of the 4 trouble makers from elementary school were held back; one is repeating the year at the same school, one changed schools, and the other two are too clever to be caught doing anything.


message 19: by Hayes (last edited Apr 18, 2010 09:33AM) (new)

Hayes (hayes13) REading the article now... "It's children who feel like they're the law of their school, that they have the right to set the law and if you challenge their power, like hooking up with the wrong boy, they have the right to put you in your place."

That's it!!! Except it was all about who could play soccer and who couldn't (they were 9 and 10 years old, remember).

ETA: Thank you Kathy... that made me feel a lot better. Exactly my experience during the episodes. It was a long two years. We ended up in family thereapy with my son in 5th grade just to make sure that he was making it throught the experience in one piece.


Kathy  (readr4ever) | 342 comments Hayes, I love the Chinese saying, too. Karma is great! The two boys who liked to make my son's recess a nightmare both went on and distinguished themselves as little hoodlums, causing trouble even in their families. I'm not happy that their families had to suffer from their bullying ways, but I was glad that other people were finally able to see them for what they were.


message 21: by Amy (new) - rated it 3 stars

Amy I'm a third of the way through and it's an interesting read so far. The cassette thing didn't bother me but Hannah to me, comes across as very whiny. I think we can all say that we've gone to school with kids that she describes in her tapes. Maybe not to the same degree but it's high school. HOw many kids really think about their actions? I really liked the Clay character so far. He seems thoughtful and caring and is really affected by this. I'm looking forward to reading his role in the tapes. Although this isn't the easiest read for me, I want to finish it because I just want to know how it ends. Definitely not a book I would choose to read on my own.


Michelle (micnandec) It's interesting how most of us have gone through the bullying experience. I remember my own bullying in middle school. It got to the point where one girl started pusing and scratching me. I turned around and cracked her one. The next day someone else wanted to start with me and I cracked my textbook over his head. I didn't get into too much trouble with those incidents mostly because I was the quiet one and nobody believed that I would fight back. They left me alone after that. I hate to advocate violence, but sometimes you need to fight back to protect yourself.

For those who like this book, I think a much better book about bullycide is By The Time You Read This, I'll Be Dead. I would recommend it as a companion to Thirteen Reasons Why. I think they compliment each other quite well.


message 23: by Amy (new) - rated it 3 stars

Amy I went to a pretty rough high school but luckily I wasn't bullied. I pretty much made friends with people in a lot of different groups. Maybe that's why I survived. I think what Hannah went through may have been extreme? I don't have any experience to draw on so I don't know. But I find it hard that the teachers wouldn't notice anything or help her.


Kathy  (readr4ever) | 342 comments Mic wrote: "It's interesting how most of us have gone through the bullying experience. I remember my own bullying in middle school. It got to the point where one girl started pusing and scratching me. I tur..."

Thanks for the recommendation, Mic.


Michelle (micnandec) Amy wrote: "I went to a pretty rough high school but luckily I wasn't bullied. I pretty much made friends with people in a lot of different groups. Maybe that's why I survived. I think what Hannah went through..."

I don't find it that hard to believe that teachers don't notice. A lot of the time, teachers are just like parents, they don't want to believe something like bullying is happening in their classroom. Or what often happens is that bullying is occurring outside of the classroom, such as in the bathrooms or hallways. Sometimes, people just don't want to get involved or they consider the bullying "normal" behavior.
I know in my experiences that is what typically happened. In the end, I was the one with the antisocial behavior and dumped in counseling. I survived because I got stronger and took a stand. I know others weren't so lucky.


message 26: by Eve (new) - rated it 5 stars

Eve | 18 comments Wow, i feel quite happy that my school time was so easy. Well, we had some fooling but i dont even remember any bullying

hopefully this book was extreme like Amy said


message 27: by Amy (new) - rated it 3 stars

Amy I'm a teacher, working in the elementary school. We don't see a lot of what we call "bullying" but a lot of kids do get picked on. I guess it is easy for it to happen. So much to deal with in a day especially when you are in an overcrowded classroom, with no help for six hours a day. That's one of the main reasons why I will never teach on the middle and high school level. Many more big problems to worry about.


vicki_girl | 157 comments Mic wrote: But regarding the reasons why Hannah did what she did: I just didn't buy it. That part felt fake or maybe it made Hannah seem like a drama-queen to me. Almost like that she was trying to be sleeping beauty in that she wanted her prince charming to save her or something. I still don't quite know, but in my eyes Hannah felt like a weak-spirited character.

This is how I felt as well. By the end I didn't feel sorry for her anymore, which is probably the opposite of what the author intended.



*****SPOILERS AHEAD*****



After the Marcus incident at Rosie's she just gave up. I don't get this at all. Some people started some rumors about her (Justin & Alex), which causes her to lose a friend (Jessica), and gives a couple of guys an excuse to act like pricks (Bryce and the Blue Spot and Marcus at Rosie's).

Speaking of which, when she actually fought back with Marcus and pushed him off the bench, he left! She follows this with "The next day, Marcus, I decided something. I decided to find out how people might react if one of the students never came back." So she's going to kill herself because she had to show some aggression for a guy to get the point No means no?

(~eye roll~) I wish that was the worst that ever happened to me.

I have no sympathy for her after that because she just let everything else happen to her. With Bryce in the hot-tub, she didn't even try to stop him in any way, not even by telling him to stop. I was completely disgusted with her at that point.

How can you expect anyone to care enough to save you, when you care don't care enough to try to save yourself?

The redeeming factor for this book for me was Clay. I adored him. It broke my heart watching him go through this. He seemed like a good person, just somewhat shy and timid around the girl he liked. I hated how he blamed himself for not trying harder. You can't save someone that doesn't want to be saved.

Eve wrote: hopefully this book was extreme like Amy said

I can tell you from my own experiences, that this was not an extreme. Not by a long shot. I second Mic's recommendation of By The Time You Read This, I'll Be Dead. Now that girl has some problems.


message 29: by Amy (new) - rated it 3 stars

Amy I think the author's point was to make us understand that any little thing (or many things combined) can make a person feel hopeless, worthless or just feel like giving up. I think the final decision came when Mr. Porter didn't help her. He was so stuck in trying to get her to tell him what she was feeling that he ignored all the warning signs and just let her go. I would have liked to see the story extended a little further. Maybe let us see how the characters changed or how their life is different knowing they were one of the reasons why Hannah committed suicide.


vicki_girl | 157 comments Amy wrote: "I think the author's point was to make us understand that any little thing (or many things combined) can make a person feel hopeless, worthless or just feel like giving up."

I agree that was the point. I also agree that little things can make a person feel worthless and it's not okay to treat people like that. You never know what will push them over the edge.

However, my problem with Hannah is she just wallowed around in her feelings of worthlessness. Pushing Marcus out of the booth is the only time in the entire book where she stood up for herself. Should she have to? No, she shouldn't. We all should treat each other with kindness and respect. But life is what it is, and rarely the way it should be.

Mr. Porter did let her go, but I'm not sure what else he could have done. As he said, she could confront the problem, or ignore it. She didn't want to do either. She wanted people to feel sorry for her, and they didn't. They cared about her, but as she said "a lot of you cared, just not enough." While Mr. Porter could maybe have stopped her this time, she would have likely ended up the same way at some point down the road IMO, because I'm not sure anyone would ever "care enough" for her.

Amy wrote: "Maybe let us see how the characters changed or how their life is different knowing they were one of the reasons why Hannah committed suicide."

Exactly. Without this element, it just comes off as a pity party for Hannah. When Clay talked to Marcus, outside Tyler's house, Marcus didn't even seem to care what he did to her. That element of the story could have been played up more. Who took the message to heart? Who blew it off, and spent the rest of their life as the same ol' prick?


Michelle (micnandec) vicki_girl wrote: "Amy wrote: "I think the author's point was to make us understand that any little thing (or many things combined) can make a person feel hopeless, worthless or just feel like giving up."

I agree th..."


Completely agree. (I already beat this book up so I'm going to keep it short). But I think that we don't see the aftermath of how people changed or who took the message to heart is a huge point of contention for me. It feels empty to me because Clay was the only decent person in the book who seemed to care or step up to help someone else. Everything else as you say was a pity party.

And yet I'm surprised by how many teens love the book and say it makes them think about their actions and how their actions affect others. That seems so strange to me....


message 32: by Amy (new) - rated it 3 stars

Amy I do agree that Hannha was having a pity party, but to the extreme! I really would have liked a little more of her home life. That might have explained the story a little better.

With Mr. Porter, the way he phrased it kind of gave her the excuse. He said she could move on. He obviously meant push the problem aside and not worry about it. She took it to mean death.


message 33: by Ashley (last edited Apr 22, 2010 06:59PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Ashley (affie) | 468 comments A lot of you mention that reading this book just felt like Hannah was having a nice little pity party for herself, but it didn't come across that way to me.

While I've never found myself to the point that Hannah did (contemplating/attempting/committing suicide) I do understand depression. My undergrad degree is in Psychology, so we studied depression, and I've been around various family members my entire life who suffer from various levels of depression, ranging from fairly moderate, to the extreme level where you are unable to muster the energy to get out of bed for days at a time, and I've experienced it personally.

Hannah felt real. *(This comment is NOT supposed to sound rude or accusatory at all*) I feel like many of the posters are judging Hannah's actions based on their own personalities and experiences. Everyone handles issues differently. Depression can make you into something that makes it hard for you to even recognize yourself. Depression can amplify everything into something huge. When you are depressed, and already feel that everyone hates you, that you are all alone, or that nothing anyone does could possibly make a difference for you now, even seemingly small actions can be enough to damage you. A completely innocent comment can be taken in the wrong way and can be devastating.

I don't think that Hannah was giving herself a pity party. I think that she was severly depressed and no one noticed. Sometimes, that can be the worst thing. You feel like your life is devastating, horrible, or worthless, but you put on a happy face and no one even notices the difference. It can be devastating. I think that she finally got to the point where she didn't think anyone would even mind too much, because no one notices her anyway, so why bother even trying any more. Everything adds to that. Once you get into the mindset that no one cares about you, or really notices who you are, everything around you increases that feeling and assumption. Everything you see around you has the potential to validate that belief.

I think Jay Asher really captured the heart of a young teen suffering from severe depression that went missed by the people who should have noticed. I think he did a great job with her character, and THAT is why it is so important that we are careful in what we say and do to others, because we have NO WAY of knowing what place they are at in their life, and in what way our actions can affect them.

That is why I think that this novel resonates with so many teens, because they see the truth in the words on the page, and it really makes you wonder and think-what if I have been part of someone else's '13' reasons. It makes you more aware of your surroundings, and I think, because we 'heard' the tapes through Clay, it might also help those teens who are suffering from depression look closer at the people around them, and realize that someone out there might be able to help us after all.


message 34: by Amy (new) - rated it 3 stars

Amy Thanks for your point of view! I think it's very true that we are all relating to this book based on our experiences in life. But that's sort of how it works! So it was good to read a post from someone who does understand the other side of things.


Michelle (micnandec) Ashley wrote: "A lot of you mention that reading this book just felt like Hannah was having a nice little pity party for herself, but it didn't come across that way to me.

While I've never found myself to the ..."


Thank you for your post! I'm familiar with the feelings of depression and it's easy to forget that everyone experiences depression differently. I'm glad to hear that the author's message resonated with teens in this way. I think if I was a teen reading this book I would have a different point of view toward it. But since I'm older (29) and gone through my own bouts of depression and came out the other end, it's a bit harder to feel sympathetic to Hannah's experiences, particularly when I'm holding those experiences up to my own. It's sort of playing the yard stick game. I'm measuring her yardstick against my own and I feeling my yardstick is more accurate. (Does that make any sense?) I think adults are more inclined to feel this way since they have more life experiences; and it does seem to me that more adults generally feel the book portrays a pity party instead of a teen with depression.


message 36: by Amy (new) - rated it 3 stars

Amy Well as adults we also know things get better. When you are in high school things always seem worse than they truly are.


Michelle (micnandec) Amy wrote: "Well as adults we also know things get better. When you are in high school things always seem worse than they truly are."

Isn't that the truth? I wish there was a way to get teens to think about life after high school and that there is so much more to the world than the school environment. I also think that as we get older and more removed from the high school experience, we forget just how difficult/frustrating life is at that age.


Andrez (andrez-ssi) my mom finished reading this book a few days ago and she told me it was okay though more for teens and now shes paying more attention to the names some people call eachother


message 39: by Amy (new) - rated it 3 stars

Amy As adults we also have more resources (and knowledge about) ways to solve problems. As kids you sort of wait around, hoping others will solve them for you, such as Hannah did in the book.


Kathy  (readr4ever) | 342 comments Mic, I just bought By The Time You Read This, I'll Be Dead, the book you recommended. I plan on reading it in the next month sometime, hopefully sooner rather than later.


Michelle (micnandec) Kathy wrote: "Mic, I just bought By The Time You Read This, I'll Be Dead, the book you recommended. I plan on reading it in the next month sometime, hopefully sooner rather than later."

I hope you enjoy it! I couldn't stop reading it, I just had to finish it! Also the back of the book has a great discussion guide. It's a book I wish more schools were willing to teach in the classroom and open up to discussions.


Kathy  (readr4ever) | 342 comments Mic wrote: "Kathy wrote: "Mic, I just bought By The Time You Read This, I'll Be Dead, the book you recommended. I plan on reading it in the next month sometime, hopefully sooner rather than lat..."

It's such an important issue, Mic. I wholeheartedly agree that schools should be bringing it to the forefront of discussion.


Heather Bree (blackdotbug) Ashley wrote: "A lot of you mention that reading this book just felt like Hannah was having a nice little pity party for herself, but it didn't come across that way to me.

While I've never found myself to the ..."


I concur completely. I think another important aspect of the book is how Hannah is supposed to deal with figuring out her sexual identity. There's so many mixed messages. There's an overriding perception out there that teens are sexually active, and yet there's an incredibly derogatory response from peers if a teen is suspected of being sexually active. Yes, she's depressed and want's someone to notice, but also she just wants to have a positive falling-in-love experience with someone. What with the rumors and the actions they lead some people to believe they can commit, it's impossible for Hannah to have a natural exploration of her feelings.


Andrez (andrez-ssi) Amy wrote: "As adults we also have more resources (and knowledge about) ways to solve problems. As kids you sort of wait around, hoping others will solve them for you, such as Hannah did in the book."

thats true too, there are not many teens who can solve their problems completely alone.thats why were not adults yet


Natalie (natkors) I liked this book. I put this in the category of "painful, but should be read" books. I too suffered from depression as a teen and could completely see where Hannah is coming from. it's so odd how little things that some people don't deem important are so vital to others. Each and every little thing just put Hannah deeper and depper into her despair until she felt there was no way up, no way out.


I have to agree with the love for Clay. To see his reactions, to feel what he was feeling, made the book that much better for me. He hurt for Hannah and at the end, decided to see if he could do something for a student like her. He was a great hero who had to suffer alot to learn how people's actions and words can affect others.


Andrez (andrez-ssi) Im happy you overcame it!


message 47: by Amy (new) - rated it 3 stars

Amy I really liked Clay. I liked how at least he was the bright spot in Hannah's world, whether he knew it or not.


Kimberly (kimberly_b) I just finished this today and I was disappointed. The story had so much potential, but it just wasn't there for me. Hannah seemed to find justification for committing suicide by interpreting events in the most negative way possible. I'm not saying that horrible things didn't happen to her or around her--they did--but did they really push he so far over the edge that she felt compelled to commit suicide? And, not only that, to create tapes which basically pointed fingers at a good majority of the people around her? Overall it was okay but definitely could have been better for me. Oh well...


Kathy  (readr4ever) | 342 comments Kimberly, I understand your frustration with Hannah, but I think Natalie put it best when she said, "it's so odd how little things that some people don't deem important are so vital to others." So, while a lot of people may think Hannah viewed things in a negative way, to her the events and interactions with people were not making mountains out of mole hills. Of course, depression, as those of us who have suffered from it know, can prevent someone from seeing anything positive when you are in its clutches.


message 50: by Kimberly (last edited May 05, 2010 10:02AM) (new) - rated it 2 stars

Kimberly (kimberly_b) Kathy wrote: "Kimberly, I understand your frustration with Hannah, but I think Natalie put it best when she said, "it's so odd how little things that some people don't deem important are so vital to others." So..."

I completely see your point, Kathy. A lot of the teens acted thoughtlessly without thinking about how it would impact others. That message came across to me clearly. It wasn't clear to me though that she was depressed in the beginning, because according to her tape everything started spiraling downward with her first kiss and the rumors. It seemed somewhere along the way she got depressed, but it wasn't very clear to me. I spent 6 years with someone who was depressed and watched him physically harm himself on more than one occasion so I know what depression can be like--you are right that it can be hard to see anything positively when you are depressed. I thought it was so terrible and sad that no one really caught the signs that Hannah was spiraling downward, especially her teacher. I would have been interested to know more about Hannah's parents and her relationship with them.


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