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THE FIRST WORLD WAR > ATLANTIC AND MEDITERRANEAN THEATER

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message 1: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited Jan 21, 2015 03:17PM) (new)

Bentley | 44207 comments Mod
This is a thread to discuss the Atlantic Ocean – Mediterranean Theater.

One good book which discusses World War I is:

The First World War by John Keegan by John Keegan John Keegan


message 2: by 'Aussie Rick' (new)

'Aussie Rick' (aussierick) If anyone is interested in reading further on the Battle of Jutland I can recommend the following good books:

The Rules of the Game Jutland and British Naval Command by Andrew Gordon by Andrew Gordon
(detailed and in-depth account of the build-up and battle)
Review:
"Anyone who is interested in warfare or the Royal Navy should read this stunningly original account of the 1916 Battle of Jutland and "the reasons why". Gordon is a compelling storyteller, and his weighty tome should frighten no one. It is a classic of the genre." - Sir Max Hastings

Jutland 1916 Death in the Grey Wastes (Cassell Military Paperbacks) by Peter Hart by Peter Hart
(full of first-hand accounts of the battle)
Publishers blurb:
On 31 May, 1916, the great battle fleets of Britain and Germany met off Jutland in the North Sea. It was a climactic encounter, the culmination of a fantastically expensive naval race between the two countries, and expectations on both sides were high. For the Royal Navy's Grand Fleet, there was the chance to win another Trafalgar. For the German High Seas Fleet, there was the opportunity to break the British blockade and so change the course of the war. But Jutland was a confused and controversial encounter. Tactically, it was a draw; strategically, it was a British victory. Naval historians have pored over the minutiae of Jutland ever since. Yet they have largely ignored what the battle was actually like for its thousands of participants. Full of drama and pathos, of chaos and courage, JUTLAND, 1916 describes the sea battle in the dreadnought era from the point of view of those who were there.

Jutland by V.E. Tarrant by V.E. Tarrant
(one of very few books offering a German perspective in English)
Publishers blurb:
Fills an important gap in the understanding of this important action Best ever charting of the battle by maps and diagrams Extensive appendices, including a summary of the more important German wireless messages

Flawed Victory Jutland, 1916 by Keith Yates Keith Yates
(easy to read general overview of the battle)

Castles of Steel Britain, Germany and the Winning of the Great War at Sea by Robert K. Massie by Robert K. Massie
(comprehensive but delighfully easy to read book)
Publishers blurb:
In August 1914, the two greatest navies in the world confronted each other across the North Sea. At first there were skirmishes, then battles off the coasts of England and Germany and in the far corners of the world, including the Falklands. The British attempted to force the Dardanelles with battleships - which led to the Gallipoli catastrophe. As the stalemate on the ground on the Western Front continued, the German Navy released a last strike against the British 'ring of steel'. The result was Jutland, a titanic and brutal battle between dreadnoughts.The knowledge, understanding and literary power Robert K. Massie brings to this story is unparalleled. There will never again be a war like this in which seagoing monsters hurl shells at each other until one side is destroyed. The story is driven by some of the most dramatically intriguing personalities in history: Churchill and Jacky Fisher, Jellicoe and Beatty. And then there were the powerful Germans - von Pohl, Scheer, Hipper, and the grand old fork-bearded genius Tirpitz. "Castles of Steel" is a book about leadership and command, bravery and timidity, genius and folly, qualities which are of course displayed magnificently by Robert K. Massie's literary mastery.


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The North Atlantic Front: The Northern Isles at War

The North Atlantic Front The Northern Isles at War by James Miller by James Miller (no photo)

Synopsis:

This book tells the story of operations along this northern front in a sequel to the author's earlier account of Scapa Flow, operations that had to contend with fierce weather as well as a determined and capable enemy. While the clandestine, daring operations of the Shetland Bus to maintain contact with occupied Norway are well known, some other aspects of the story have almost faded from memory: the Northern Patrol of armed merchant cruisers based in Shetland in between 1914 and 1918 that implemented an effective blockade on German commerce; the lonely patrols of the Coastal Command flying boats; and the military occupation of the Faroes and Iceland in between 1940 and 1945. The book also recounts some remarkable incidents, such as the arrest in 1914 of the staff of the Lerwick Post Office, the laying and clearing of the North Sea mine barrage, and the VE Day riots in Reykjavik. Illustrated with over a hundred archive photographs, this is a fascinating glimpse into a theatre of war overlooked by other naval history books.


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Crisis At Sea: The United States Navy in European Waters in World War I

Crisis At Sea The United States Navy in European Waters in World War I by William N. Still Jr. by William N. Still Jr. (no photo)

Synopsis:

Crisis at Sea is the first comprehensive history of the United States Navy in European waters during World War I. Drawing on vast American, British, German, French, and Italian sources, the author presents the U.S. Naval experience as America moved into the modern age of naval warfare. Not limited to an operations account of naval battles and strategies, this volume - the second in a series - examines diplomatic policies, cabinet decisions, logistics, the home front, support systems, and shipbuilding to illustrate the complexity and enormity of America's naval participation in World War I. This is a thorough treatment of not only the events but also the personalities of the war, with particular attention to the difficulties they faced. The book reveals penetrating insights into the United States' relations in the world, the nation's unpreparedness for such a war, the limits imposed on the Navy by the cabinet, and the unexpected conclusion to the war. Much of the author's exhaustive research is new, such as the use of French official documents and British recollections of the American ships and sailors. This book will be the standard reference volume for libraries and serious scholars with a special interest in World War I and in the history of warfare


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The Great War at Sea: 1914-1918

The Great War at Sea, 1914-1918 by Richard Hough by Richard Hough (no photo)

Synopsis:

The author of The Bounty argues here that it was the war at sea, rather than the more famous land battles, that decided the course of World War I. This masterful narrative covers both the grand strategy and war at the individual level, as Germany is strangled by the Allied blockade, U-boat operations eventually bring America into the war, and attempts to break the blockade lead not only to the great naval battle at Jutland but some of the war's major land campaigns.


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The Great War at Sea: A Naval History of the First World War

The Great War at Sea A Naval History of the First World War by Lawrence Sondhaus by Lawrence Sondhaus (no photo)

Synopsis:

This is a major new naval history of the First World War which reveals the decisive contribution of the war at sea to Allied victory. In a truly global account, Lawrence Sondhaus traces the course of the campaigns in the North Sea, Atlantic, Adriatic, Baltic and Mediterranean and examines the role of critical innovations in the design and performance of ships, wireless communication and firepower. He charts how Allied supremacy led the Central Powers to attempt to revolutionize naval warfare by pursuing unrestricted submarine warfare, ultimately prompting the United States to enter the war. Victory against the submarine challenge, following their earlier success in sweeping the seas of German cruisers and other surface raiders, left the Allies free to use the world's sea lanes to transport supplies and troops to Europe from overseas territories, and eventually from the United States, which proved a decisive factor in their ultimate victory.


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The Great War at sea: A history of Naval Action 1914-18

The Great War at sea A history of naval action 1914-18 by A.A. Hoehling by A.A. Hoehling A.A. Hoehling

Synopsis:

Written with crisp authority, this book presents a panorama of the battles, ships, & fighting men whose blood reddened the seas during the First World War. The book describes the mighty lines of battleships and cruisers and the revolutionary entry of the submarine onto the naval scene. This is an excellent reference book with the fast pace of an action novel.


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A Naval History Of World War 1

A Naval History Of World War 1 by Paul G. Halpern by Paul G. Halpern (no photo)

Synopsis:

This book aims to provide a definitive work on the First World War at sea. It aims to cover, in a single volume, many aspects of the naval war and to treat the conflict, from the viewpoints of "all" the participants rather than just the Anglo-German perspective.A Naval History of World War I represents a major contribution to our understanding of the operation, tactics and strategy of the First World War. The book covers the activities of the French and British in the Mediterranean, the Italians and Austrians in the Adriatic, and the Russians, Germans and Turks in the Baltic and Black Seas. Detailing the Royal Navy's campaign against the German raiders, the colonial campaigns and the major overseas expeditions, Professor Halpern examines not only naval operations, but leadership, policy, strategy, tactics and technology and relates these to the wider political, diplomatic and economic aspects of the war.; Covering lesser-known conflicts such as the Rumanian campaign and the Danube Flotillas, as well as the historic battles of Jutland, the Dardanelles and the anti-submarine warfare, the author presents a fully comprehensive and accessible treatment. The book is intended for all serious students of the First World War.


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The First Naval Air War

The First Naval Air War by Terry C. Treadwell by Terry C. Treadwell (no photo)

Synopsis:

The First World War was to introduce many innovative and novel ways of killing the enemy. It was the first truly modern war fought with modern equipment, and for the first time the newfangled aircraft were to play their part. Of the 57 nations involved in the First World War, only 14 had a naval air force of any description. The first aircraft were flimsy and fragile, but by late 1914 they had progressed from limited reconnaissance duties to an offensive role. By the end of the war, aviation was an important element of the modern navy. The first aircraft carriers appeared and it was obvious that the days of the capital ship were coming to an end. The First Naval Air War is the story of the development of naval aviation from those fledgling squadrons of 1914 to the major weapon in the armory of naval warfare in only five years.


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Stalking the U-Boat: U.S. Naval Aviation in Europe during World War I

Stalking the U-Boat U.S. Naval Aviation in Europe during World War I by Geoffrey L. Rossano by Geoffrey L. Rossano (no photo)

Synopsis:

Stalking the U-Boat is the first and only comprehensive study of U.S. naval aviation operations in Europe during WWI. The navy's experiences in this conflict laid the foundations for the later emergence of aviation as a crucial--sometimes dominant--element of fleet operations, yet those origins have been previously poorly understood and documented.

Begun as antisubmarine operations, naval aviation posed enormous logistical, administrative, personnel, and operational problems. How the USN developed this capability--on foreign soil in the midst of desperate conflict--makes a fascinating tale sure to appeal to all military and naval historians.


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The Grand Fleet 1914-19: The Royal Navy in the First World War

The Grand Fleet 1914-19 The Royal Navy in the First World War by Daniel G. Ridley-Kitts by Daniel G. Ridley-Kitts (no photo)

Synopsis:

World War I was the first real time in 100 years that the reputation of the British Royal Navy was put on the line in defense of the country. This book tells of the creation and development of the Grand Fleet under the drive of the energetic and charismatic admiral of the fleet, "Jacky" Fisher, who modernized the navy with the introduction of the revolutionary Dreadnought battleship. This type of vessel in particular made other nations’ battleships obsolete, created a powerful weapon for the defense of Empire and trade, and finally defeated the designs of Kaiser William III. Using unique technical drawings rendered by the author, the history of the Grand Fleet is told in accessible narrative style, with outstanding technical detail which will satisfy naval enthusiasts.


message 12: by Jerome, Assisting Moderator - Upcoming Books and Releases (new)

Jerome | 4354 comments Mod
The only book covering the Mediterranean theater:

The Naval War in the Mediterranean, 1914-1918 by Paul G. Halpern by Paul G. Halpern (no photo)


message 13: by Bryan (new)

Bryan Craig Besides U-Boats, the naval war in WWI was a big disappointed for naval strategists who wanted their large dreadnoughts to fight it out. Just Jutland.

Thanks Jerome.


message 14: by Jill (new)

Jill Hutchinson (bucs1960) So true, Bryan and even Jutland was a big disappointment........both sides claimed victory and that question has never really been answered. It wasn't much of a battle for two countries that had such naval strength.


message 15: by Laura (last edited Nov 04, 2014 08:02PM) (new)

Laura Meyerovich (laurameyerovich) | 11 comments Dreadnought by Robert Massie (no link available) also covers this topic and period, but looks at the battleship situation for the navies of the "Powers" (main European countries), which changed dramatically with the introduction of dreadnoughts because they could outsail and outgun existing ships.


message 16: by Jill (new)

Jill Hutchinson (bucs1960) You may have made a typing error when entering the title and the book search is unforgiving to say the least. This is a great book.....I read it a couple of years ago and its companion book as noted below.

Castles of Steel by Robert K. Massie and Dreadnought by Robert K. Massie by Robert K. Massie Robert K. Massie


message 17: by Laura (last edited Nov 05, 2014 03:56AM) (new)

Laura Meyerovich (laurameyerovich) | 11 comments Thanks, I will add Castles of Steel to my reading list.

Does he mention that a Russian cruiser (Askold) was part of the British fleet in the Mediterranean operations? She participated in the Mediterranean battles as part of the British fleet. After the revolution, she was incorporated into the British fleet as Glory IV. She was later sold to the Soviet government for a cost of guarding her while in storage and sold by them for scrap. Alexey Krylov sailed on her maiden voyage to Japan and then was in the commission that decided her fate. He wrote about both events in his memoir.

Professor Krylov's Navy


message 18: by Bryan (new)

Bryan Craig I like Massie's books, too.

I can't remember about the Askold, thanks Laura.

Don't forget to use the citations:

Professor Krylov's Navy by Alexey Krylov by Alexey Krylov (no photo)

Dreadnought by Robert K. Massie Castles of Steel by Robert K. Massie by Robert K. Massie Robert K. Massie


message 19: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 44207 comments Mod
Thanks Laura, Jill, Bryan and Jerome


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The Central Powers in the Adriatic, 1914-1918: War in a Narrow Sea

The Central Powers in the Adriatic, 1914-1918 War in a Narrow Sea by Charles W. Koburger Jr. by Charles W. Koburger Jr. (no photo)

Synopsis:

The naval side of the First World War in the Adriatic provides a classic case study in narrow sea warfare. This is the story of the Austro-Hungarian KuK Navy's contribution to the Central Powers' considerable effort in the region. This finely balanced, well-handled navy successfully helped to defend Austria's Adriatic base of power--the Pola-Trieste-Fiume triangle--in the north, to protect the vital sea lane to Cattaro and the south, and to support the army from the sea--all against major odds. Its forces also contributed significantly to the U-boat war.

During initial stages of the conflict, the French were the enemy at sea. Later, Italy switched allegiances, joining the Entente against her former allies. Because the KuK Kriegsmarine was no match for the Italians and the French combined, the battle fleet was thereafter kept in being at Pola, holding the Allies in check. Nonetheless, the Adriatic became an Austrian lake. Using aircraft, U-boats, torpedoes, and mines, the KuK worked toward reducing the odds against it. However, the impasse would continue until the armistice, ruling out a Mahanian showdown in the Adriatic. Koburger provides important geostrategic points of comparison and valuable lessons for other conflicts, even today.


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The Battle of the Otranto Straits: Controlling the Gateway to the Adriatic in World War I

The Battle of the Otranto Straits Controlling the Gateway to the Adriatic in World War I by Paul G. Halpern by Paul G. Halpern (no photo)

Synopsis:

Called by some a "Mediterranean Jutland," the Battle of the Otranto Straits involved warships from Austria, Germany, Italy, Britain, and France. Although fought by light units with no dreadnoughts involved, Otranto was a battle in three dimensions—engaging surface vessels, aircraft, and subsurface weapons (both submarines and mines). An attempt to halt the movement of submarines into the Adriatic using British drifters armed with nets and mines led to a raid by Austrian light cruisers. The Austrians inflicted heavy damage on the drifters, but Allied naval forces based at Brindisi cut off their withdrawal. The daylight hours saw a running battle, with the Austrians at considerable risk. Heavier Austrian units put out from Cattaro in support, and at the climactic moment the Allied light forces had to turn away, permitting the Austrians to escape. In the end, the Austrians had inflicted more damage than they suffered themselves. The Otranto action shows the difficulties of waging coalition warfare in which diplomatic and national jealousies override military efficiency.


message 22: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 44207 comments Mod
Laura - hi - the link is considered self promotion - if you want to type in a synopsis and an excerpt minus the link ok - but no self promotion.

Laura posted:

Unbelievable how everything is connected. I was checking that ALexey Krylov's memoir listed correct name (Bellini) for the captain of the Dante Alighieri, an Italian battleship. Krylov describes how in 1913, with liberal application of Madeira wine, two Russian ship engineers obtained access to the (at the time) enemy Italian battleship.
The name was correct, Silvio Bellini. He was promoted shortly after that and commanded Allied ships in Adriatic. He was replaced shortly before the Battle of Otranto.


message 23: by Laura (last edited Jan 21, 2015 06:40PM) (new)

Laura Meyerovich (laurameyerovich) | 11 comments Good point. Here it is:

In March of 1913, two Russian ship engineers obtained access to the just-launched Italian battleship Dante Alighieri, the first battleship with triple-gun turrets for the main armament.

Important military information was passed to an unfriendly nation (Italy was an ally of Germany and Austria, while Russia was allied with France and Great Britain).

The Dante Alighieri was in Madeira when the German steamer Meteor called at port. The Russian Naval Ministry had chartered the Meteor to test the performance of Frahm anti-roll tanks.

Admiral Krylov delayed the departure from Madeira by several days, hoping to learn more about the Italian battleship. Krylov showed Italians anti-rolling tanks installed on the German liner, and in exchange obtained access to the Italian battleship. A piece of friendly spying ensued.

"I instructed ship engineers Grauen and Yakovlev to show the Italians all our installations in detail while I showed them to Captain Bellini and explained the essence of the matter. After treating the Italians to a good meal, I told Grauen and Yakovlev to go ashore with them, not to spare Madeira at my expense, and to establish such an alliance with the Italians, that the next day, inviting Grauen and Yakovlev to the battleship, they would show everything, not only what was on the upper deck. The examination of the Frahm tanks provided sufficient excuse, with the warmed-up benevolence of the Italians (Grauen could drink, without batting an eye, however much of whatever was available), to show the entire ship. Our engineers noted a number of original and practical devices that, upon return, they reported to the Naval Technical Committee and Admiralty Works."

The competition for building more and better battleships before WWI was fierce. Robert Massie published a 1000-page tome about it which reads like a thriller.

Dreadnought by Robert K. Massie Dreadnought by Robert K. Massie Robert K. Massie


message 24: by Jerome, Assisting Moderator - Upcoming Books and Releases (new)

Jerome | 4354 comments Mod
An upcoming book:
Release date: July 15, 2015

From Imperial Splendor to Internment: The German Navy in the First World War

From Imperial Splendor to Internment The German Navy in the First World War by Nicholas Wolz by Nicholas Wolz (no photo)

Synopsis:

This important new work describes how the Imperial German Navy, which had expanded to become one of the great maritime forces in the world, second only to the Royal Navy, proved, with the exception of its submarines, to be largely ineffective throughout the years of conflict.

The impact of this impotence had a far-reaching effect upon the service. Germany, indeed most of Europe, was in the grips of a spirit of militant nationalistic fervor, and the inactivity of the great Imperial Navy caused deep frustration, particularly among the naval officers. Not only were they unable to see themselves as heroes, they were also ridiculed on the home front and felt profoundly humiliated. With the exception of the one sea battle at Jutland, their ships saw little or no action at sea and morale slowly collapsed to a point where, at the end of the war, the crews were in a state of mutiny. The seemingly ludicrous order that forced the fleet to go to sea against the British in 1918 was driven by a sense of humiliation, but coming at the war's end it triggered a revolution because the German sailors wanted no part in such madness. The internment at Scapa Flow was the ultimate shaming.

This is a fascinating and perceptive analysis of a whole era, and it contributes substantially to our understanding of the war and its consequences - consequences, sadly, that helped pave the way for the Third Reich.


message 25: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 44207 comments Mod
Once again - thank you


message 26: by Jerome, Assisting Moderator - Upcoming Books and Releases (new)

Jerome | 4354 comments Mod
Another:
Release date: October 15, 2016

The War in the North Sea: The Royal Navy and the Imperial German Navy 1914-1918

The War in the North Sea The Royal Navy and the Imperial German Navy 1914-1918 by Quintin Barry by Quintin Barry (no photo)

Synopsis:

For years before the outbreak of the First World War, it was the expectation of most officers of the Royal Navy and the Imperial German Navy that very shortly thereafter, a decisive fleet action would be fought. This had a major impact on the strategic thinking on both sides of the North Sea. In fact, the unalterable geographic situation meant that for the Grand Fleet in its Scottish bases, the correct course to follow was not to seek a major fleet encounter. Essentially, it was by staying where it was that it could neutralise the High Seas Fleet and enforce an economic blockade of Germany. The history of the war in the North Sea between 1914 and 1918 is a record of the attempts to break the deadlock - and it is also the history of the men who led the British and German navies.

On both sides, the stresses of the huge burden which they bore led to a serious breakdown of trust in each other on the part of the admirals charged with the responsibility. Still more serious was the mutual loss of confidence between the admirals on the one hand and the politicians on the other; their letters and diaries reveal the bitter personal disputes that arose between them.

The principal naval battle of Jutland occurred when the two most powerful fleets that the world had ever known clashed, almost by accident, in the North Sea on 31 May 1916. The outcome of the battle has prompted a minute examination of the tactics employed by the commanders, and a continuous debate as to who won, as well as a bitter controversy between the supporters of Sir John Jellicoe (the commander-in-chief of the Grand Fleet) and Sir David Beatty (the commander of the battle cruisers). Most British historians claim the battle as a British victory - a view which this book questions. It has been often suggested that after Jutland, the High Seas Fleet remained in harbour for the rest of the war, but as this book shows, the underrated Admiral Reinhard Scheer (its commander-in-chief) subsequently launched a number of major sorties. It was a series of chances that had determined the outcome of Jutland - and it was chance that repeatedly intervened to prevent a decisive encounter subsequently.

This book reviews the entire course of the war in the North Sea, from the first contacts between the fleets in the early days, to the ambitious (but abortive) mission planned at the end of the war for the High Seas Fleet - and, as a dramatic epilogue, its scuttling in Scapa Flow.


message 27: by Jill (new)

Jill Hutchinson (bucs1960) Great add, Jerome.


message 28: by Dimitri (last edited Mar 11, 2016 02:58PM) (new)

Dimitri | 600 comments Jerome wrote: "The Great War at Sea: A Naval History of the First World War

The Great War at Sea A Naval History of the First World War by Lawrence Sondhaus by Lawrence Sondhaus (no photo)
"


not allowed to link to it in here (I think) but this earned a glowing review :)

For the German perspective on Jutland and naval aviation there exist also respectively

Jutland: The German Perspective - A New View of the Great Battle, 31 May 1916

Jutland The German Perspective - A New View of the Great Battle, 31 May 1916 (Cassell Military Paperbacks) by V.E. Tarrant byV.E. Tarrant(no photo)

Naval Aviation In The First World War: Its Impact And Influence

Naval Aviation In The First World War Its Impact And Influence by R.D. Layman byR.D. Layman(no photo)


message 29: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 44207 comments Mod
Thank you Dimitri


message 30: by Jill (new)

Jill Hutchinson (bucs1960) The vaunted German High Seas Fleet really only had one major battle (Jutland) and ignominiously ended up at the bottom of Scapa Flow by their own hand.

The Grand Scuttle: The Sinking of the German Fleet at Scapa Flow

The Grand Scuttle The Sinking Of The German Fleet At Scapa Flow In 1919 by Dan van der Vat by Dan van der Vat (no photo)

Synopsis:

On June 21, 1919 the Scottish anchorage at Scapa Flow witnessed one of the most dramatic events in naval history. The German High Seas Fleet had sailed into British waters under the terms of the treaty ending World War I. Possibly misled by British newspaper reports, the German admiral in command decided to scuttle the fleet rather than let it fall into British hands--the operation resulting in the last casualties and the last prisoners of World War I.


message 31: by Dimitri (last edited Oct 04, 2016 02:57AM) (new)

Dimitri | 600 comments Before Jutland: The Naval War in Northern European Waters, August 1914 February 1915

Before Jutland The Naval War in Northern European Waters, August 1914 February 1915 by James Goldrick by James Goldrick(no photo)

Before Jutland is a definitive study of the naval engagements in northern European waters in 1914 15 when the German High Sea Fleet faced the Grand Fleet in the North Sea and the Russian Fleet in the Baltic. Author James Goldrick reexamines one of the key periods of naval operations in the First World War, arguing that a focus on the campaign on the western front conceals the reality that the Great War was also a maritime conflict. Combining new historical information from primary sources with a comprehensive analysis of the operational issues, this book is an extensive revision of The King s Ships Were at Sea, Goldrick s earlier work on this naval campaign. In all, Before Jutland shows not only what happened, but how the various navies evolved to meet the challenges that they faced during the Great War and whether or not that evolution was successful."


message 32: by Jill (new)

Jill Hutchinson (bucs1960) I have that book on my tbr list, Dimitri.


message 33: by Dimitri (new)

Dimitri | 600 comments Publication date: 28 Dec 2016

The Imperial German Navy of World War I, Vol. 1 Warships: A Comprehensive Photographic Study of the Kaiser S Naval Forces

(no cover) by The Imperial German Navy of World War I, Vol. 1 Warships: A Comprehensive Photographic Study of the Kaiser S Naval ForcesbyJeffrey Judge(no photo)

Synopsis:

The Imperial German Navy of WWI is a series of books (Warships, Campaigns, & Uniforms) that provide a broad view of the Kaiser's naval forces through the extensive use of photographs. Every effort has been made to cover all significant areas during the war period. In addition to the primary use of photographs, technical information is provided for each warship along with its corresponding service history; with a special emphasis being placed on those warships that participated in the Battle of Skagerrak (Jutland). Countless sources have been used to establish individual case studies for each warship; multiple photos of each warship are provided. The entire series itself is unprecedented in its coverage of the Kaiser's navy.


note: bookdepository and other sites do feature a cover. This item can also be posted in Jutland and most other WWI naval topics.


message 34: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 44207 comments Mod
Thank you Dmitri for the add


message 35: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited Apr 16, 2018 02:23PM) (new)

Bentley | 44207 comments Mod
World War I Seaplane and Aircraft Carriers

World War I Seaplane and Aircraft Carriers by Mark Lardas by Mark Lardas (no photo)

Synopsis:

In 1910 the first aircraft was successfully launched from a small wooden platform on a stationary ship.

Just four years later, seaplane-carrying warships were being used to launch the first naval air raids, and by 1918 the first aircraft carrier to feature a full-length flight deck was in service.

High quality artwork and historical photographs help author Mark Lardas tell the fascinating story of the pioneering years of naval aviation, covering such historic clashes as the Japanese siege of Tsingtao, the British raid against German Zeppelin bases at Cuxhaven, and the Battle of Jutland, which saw the first airplane take part in a naval battle.

Through detailed analysis he explores their development from hastily adapted merchant ships to the launch of HMS Argus, the first aircraft carrier to have a full-length flight deck, and shows how they paved the way for the aircraft carriers of the future.

About the Authors:

Mark Lardas has a degree in Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering, but spent his early career at the Johnson Space Center doing Space Shuttle structural analysis and navigation. He works in League City, Texas, and has written about modeling, and naval, maritime, and military history.

Paul Wright has painted ships of all kinds, specializing in steel and steam warships from the late 19th century to the present day. A Member of the Royal Society of Marine Artists, Paul lives and works in Surrey.

Review:

". . . even the experienced aviation enthusiast may find interesting perspectives here." - Warship International


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