Ask Sharon E. Cathcart discussion

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For those who have read, or are interested in, "In The Eye of The Beholder"

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message 1: by Sharon (new)

Sharon (fiona64) | 58 comments Mod
Post your questions here. :-)


message 2: by Cecilia (new)

Cecilia | 4 comments What intrigued you about the "Phantom of the Opera" to write your own story about him?


message 3: by Sharon (new)

Sharon (fiona64) | 58 comments Mod
Cecilia wrote: "What intrigued you about the "Phantom of the Opera" to write your own story about him?"

Hi, Cecilia. Thanks so much for your question.

The story has intrigued me ever since I first read Gaston Leroux's original novel, well over 20 years ago. It has its roots in the Greco-Roman myth of Cupid and Psyche. I find it amazing that so many versions of this story, across numerous cultures, are out there.

The other thing that fascinated me is that Erik is very much like Jung's archetype of the wounded healer. Through his own pain, he is healing Christine's grief for her father (remember, she sings better with his assistance). So, my thought on this book was "What if there was a more experienced woman than Christine who could provide a reciprocal wounded healer relationship with Erik."

It started out as a short story that just kept going, through lots of changes. The relationship between Erik and Claire is tumultuous -- neither of them are easy people, to say the least.

Thanks for the opportunity to share!


message 4: by Cecilia (new)

Cecilia | 4 comments Wow...great answer! I didn't know this story had it's roots in Greco-Roman mythology or that other cultures have their own versions of the story...very interesting!

I think your book sounds interesting, too. It would be nice to read a story where Erik could benefit from a more 'personal' relationship for a change.

Thanks for your answer, Sharon. I look forward to getting & reading a copy of your book soon.


message 5: by Sharon (last edited Mar 31, 2010 11:40AM) (new)

Sharon (fiona64) | 58 comments Mod
Cecilia wrote: "Wow...great answer! I didn't know this story had it's roots in Greco-Roman mythology or that other cultures have their own versions of the story...very interesting!

I think your book sounds int..."


Hi, Cecilia. Yep, just about every culture has a story of a healer whose protege is not allowed to see him. Even Charles Perrault's fairy tale, "Beauty and the Beast," comes from the same roots.

I hope to have some exciting news tomorrow that will make the book much more accessible to my friends in the US. It's on Amazon UK already (my publisher is based in London), but stay tuned!!


message 6: by Cecilia (new)

Cecilia | 4 comments Ah-hah...I get the connection now when you mentioned "Beauty & the Beast"...really cool and I really never even thought much about that in connection with the "Phantom". Thanks for enlightening me! I think the more you know about the background or roots of a story the more meaningful it is or can be.

I'll look forward to the news about your book & its accessibility to us in the States...:>

Thanks so much for sharing all of this, Sharon.

Take care...Cecilia


message 7: by Sharon (new)

Sharon (fiona64) | 58 comments Mod
Cecilia wrote: "Ah-hah...I get the connection now when you mentioned "Beauty & the Beast"...really cool and I really never even thought much about that in connection with the "Phantom". Thanks for enlightening me!..."

Hi, Cecilia. I've been given the go-ahead to start sharing the good news: I have a US publisher for "In The Eye of The Beholder." I will be with TreasureLine Publishing, which is a small press based in Oklahoma. We are just getting started with the nitty-gritty, and it will be a process that takes time (as with any such venture). However, that pesky "out of print" notice that keeps showing up on Amazon US (despite my London publisher's constant arguing with them) will no longer be an issue and people who like a hard copy instead of an eBook will be able to have one easily.

Hooray!


message 8: by Cecilia (new)

Cecilia | 4 comments Hooray, indeed, and congratulations!!!


message 9: by Jaimey (new)

Jaimey (jaimeygrant) | 3 comments Woo-hoo, Sharon! Excellent news, indeed!

I've been racking my brain for a question to ask you but I've come to know you rather well so all the questions I would ask I already know the answers.

There is also the question of how much to say. I assume Cecelia has not read the book. I would like some more knowledge of certain aspects of the story but I don't want to spoil the story for anyone else. What are the rules regarding this issue? Should we start a thread with SPOILER ALERT in the title for those of us who have read the book?


message 10: by Sharon (new)

Sharon (fiona64) | 58 comments Mod
Jaimey wrote: "Woo-hoo, Sharon! Excellent news, indeed!

I've been racking my brain for a question to ask you but I've come to know you rather well so all the questions I would ask I already know the answers.

Th..."

That's a great idea, Jaimey. I'll set one up.


message 11: by Sharon (new)

Sharon (fiona64) | 58 comments Mod
I'm doing an interview about In The Eye of The Beholder on September 17: please have a look at the event.

All Things Phantom Author Reunion Show on Blogtalk Radio

Would love to have all of you join us!


message 12: by Heather (new)

Heather Wilmoth (missoperaghost) | 1 comments How did you come up with s wonderful story based on the phantom of the opera? Do you have any more books based off the Phantom?


message 13: by Sharon (new)

Sharon (fiona64) | 58 comments Mod
Heather wrote: "How did you come up with s wonderful story based on the phantom of the opera? Do you have any more books based off the Phantom?"

Hi, Heather, and thank you for your question! I apologize for my delay in seeing it, first off!

At the time I started In The Eye of The Beholder: A Novel of The Phantom of the Opera, I was an equestrian athlete (I've since had to quit because of a back injury). I decided to apply some of the things I knew about dressage to a character (Claire) who was based on real-life people who were in 19th C. operas -- which often contained spectacles to try to get people to look at the stage instead of one another. In this case, Claire's an equestrian (other spectacles included things like roller-skaters, believe it or not!). So, I put her in the opera house to meet Erik, and let the chips fall where they may.

I have three other books, one of which is an omnibus edition containing both of my POTO novels and the award-winning related short-story collection:

In The Eye of The Storm: A Novel of the Phantom of the Opera
Through the Opera Glass
Seen Through the Phantom's Eyes: The Omnibus Edition

Thanks again for your question!


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