Young Adult Book Reading Challenges discussion

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Member's Chat > Speaking of Young Adult books....

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message 1: by Angie, YA lovin mod!! (new)

Angie | 2687 comments Mod
Check out this post from Goodreads

http://www.goodreads.com/blog/show/21...


message 2: by Annalisa (last edited Mar 16, 2010 09:32PM) (new)

Annalisa (goodreadsannalisa) I saw this link on facebook earlier and thought it interesting. What does it say about me that I've read all those books? :) (Okay, Lost Symbol is on my ipod next in line for my audiobook and Outliers in my stack of borrowed books to read next but they will be read soon).
I was thinking about our discussion here about how many of us read young adult so we can read cleaner literature. I think more than ever young adult appeals to all ages.


message 3: by Lisa (new)

Lisa Vegan (lisavegan) Yes, I saw that. I didn't "like" it because I'm way over 40 and enjoy ya books more now than I did in my thirties. Go figure. There actually weren't official ya books when I was young, but such books were around. I've always liked ya & kids books but in my twenties and thirties read fewer of them than at any other points in my life.


message 4: by Brenda (new)

Brenda (brlemon) | 149 comments As a teacher-librarian, my start with reading YA books was over 15 years ago when I realized I needed to read the same books the kids read so I am familiar with the books/topics/themes/ect. I have read so many YA and Juv. books over the years that when I do attempt to read an "adult" book, I find myself losing interest very quickly. They just don't seem to have the drama, suspense, and mysterious elements at the same quick rate as YA. And to be honest, even if I wasn't a teacher-librarian, I would probably still read YA and Juv literature.


message 5: by Julia (new)

Julia | 432 comments Like Brenda, as a special ed HS teacher, I read YA books to have books to recommend (or not) for my students. At least, that's how I got started. I now have hundreds of books in my classroom library. I have many of my favorites at home *and* at school. I also read "adult" books, just like I read science fiction, fantasy, contemporary fiction and nonfiction.


message 6: by Megan (new)

Megan | 5 comments Where are all of these adult YA readers? I'm so embarrased carrying my YA books around ~ cause I'm 37 ;) When I pick up reserves from the library, I always wonder if the librarian suspects I have a homebound teenage daughter, or if she knows they are really for me, lol.

I have always been an avid reader & gave up on YA when I was around 12 or so. I don't know if it was more me or the YA books available at the time ~ but I hated YA books when I was the approptriate age. I remember that is when I started getting into Stephen King & other adult books. In my mid-30's I discovered all of these wonderful YA stories that I simply felt "too mature" for back in the day. Go figure =)


message 7: by AH (new)

AH I am a 40 something Young Adult reader and proud of it. I initially started reading YA to get my boys ages 10, 14,17 reading, but I fell in love. First of all, the print is a little larger and double spaced. (Great for those middle aged eyes). Second, I could read a book rather quickly. Third, I realized that I enjoyed this genre more than any other. (and I read Michener, Stephen King, Clancy and others before). I used to read long historical novels, but this genre is more fun.

I think that when we were 12 or so, YA was not well developed and if you were a good reader you jumped to adult bestsellers which were not always appropriate for children.

My YA obsession started with the Twilight books for me, then I moved to Cassandra Clare, Hunger Games, Beautiful Creatures, Hush Hush, Vampire Academy, Percy Jackson. My 10 year old is now reading a lot because of my obsession, so I must be doing something right.


message 8: by Ashley (new)

Ashley (readerandwriter) I love the YA genre. It touches on subjects that most of us can relate to, especially teenagers. It is also fun and doesn't put us to sleep.

I plan on being a teacher, so it's a good thing I am reading all these YA books. I can recommend to my students a lot good books to read.


message 9: by Renee (new)

Renee | 2 comments I'm 32 years old, and the majority of the books I read lately are YA books. Yes, I feel a little silly slipping into the YA section of the library. However, I am writing a YA novel, and I just think to myself, this is for research purposes. :)

Seriously though, I have been greatly moved by children's books my whole life, so I figure why stop now just because I happen to hit a certain age.


message 10: by Angie, YA lovin mod!! (new)

Angie | 2687 comments Mod
I do not get embarrassed carrying around my YA books.... people think it's weird I mod a YA book club but once I get them to read a book they totally get it.


message 11: by Brenda (new)

Brenda (brlemon) | 149 comments Actually, I have seen more and more adults either checking out YA books themselves or grabbing their teenagers YA books out of their hands and not only reading them but enjoying them. YA books are not just for teenagers any more than picture books are only for preschool kids. Young Adult literature has really changed in the past 5-10 years. The themes in the books are the same as in the so-called adult books: romance, acceptance, finding yourself, hierarchy, trust, family drama, ect. The only difference between YA books and your average adult book is usually the length of the story, the pace of the action, and the age of the characters. But the overall main theme is the same.


message 12: by Megan (new)

Megan | 5 comments Wish I had the same amount of confidence that you all seem to :) I just can't help feeling a little out of place at a coffee shop reading my latest YA book.

It's true that YA novels have gotten better over the years. When I was a kid I remember YA being a lot of Sweet Valley High and the like. Yuck! I have always assumed that J.K.Rowling is responsible for bringing YA into the limelight and showing that a book for kids can be not only well written, but meaningful to adults as well. I mean, really ~ who doesn't like Harry Potter? ;)


message 13: by Kelly (new)

Kelly RAley (kraley) | 100 comments Megan, that makes me sad. So many of my beloved YA books show our young people how to not care what the herd is doing. I feel like you shouldn't worry at all about what people think about what you're reading. In my exp most people are very self-involved and coulnt care less about others' choices. If it really bugs you, checkout audiobooks from you library. No one will know what you're listening to. Goal for 2010 "Read YA Proudly." I'd much rather get caught reading YA than a bodice ripper.


message 14: by Fitz (new)

Fitz Amy (fitzamy) | 4 comments When I was a teen, I used to laugh at adults on the train who were reading YA books because I was reading adult fiction then. But as I grew older, I got bored of the adult fiction because there was always too much sex and romance, even in crime thriller books. And I guess I started to really read more and more YA books because of Twilight. And, I figured if I were to read the same books as my 16 year old sister, we could actually discuss them, giving her more motivation to actually finish reading a book.
Right now, I am not ashamed to say I am one of those adults who openly read YA books on train rides. :)


message 15: by Kayzee (last edited Mar 30, 2010 04:01PM) (new)

Kayzee | 180 comments I never read books since I was a kid untill last year. and that were twilight come in and I fell inlove with it. ( now I dont have the same veiws, still like it, but don't love it lol) and now I am so addicted to reading and it is teaching me words and skills I'm lacking from leaving school so younge. And I am proud to say that I'm loving young adult lol but I am only 24 so am I still a young adult or is it time to grow up hahaha


message 16: by M (new)

M I've always loved YA, especially fantasy and sci-fi. As has been mentioned, back in the day it wasn't called YA, but it still existed. I think YA fantasy has always been a cross-over genre. I tend to prefer it to that written for adults, which tends to have so much gratuitous sex and violence.

I think one of the things that appeals to me about the YA fantasy genre is that it typically involves a young adult protagonist who, in their "quest" to battle "good vs. evil," is coming of age--they are learning their strengths and weaknesses, falling in love, etc., which is something we can all relate to.

I also think that many YA writers don't necessarily write specifically for that audience. Many times books will have multiple layers, some of which will be much better understood by adults.

Kind of like animated kids movies--Like Shrek, for insance--the kids love the stories, but there is a lot that kids would never pick up on!


message 17: by A.O. (last edited Apr 01, 2010 12:51PM) (new)

A.O. Peart (aopeart) Well, like many of us here I am past my teenage years :-) I got into YA books after Twilight (which I am not a big fan of since in my humble opinion, Meyers is not a good writer - there are many much more talented writers out there and unfortunately not as popular; but that's a different story). Good YA stories are fun, full of wonderful twists, romance, great plot. They keep my eyes glued to the pages with intensity that most of the "adult" books can't achieve (well, maybe with an exception of Charlaine Harris's novels).
I’m working on my own YA Urban fantasy novel and if all goes right, it might find its own spot on the bookstores’ shelves (hopefully in not too distant future).
Angela @ http://www.cheeriosandpearlsstories.b...


message 18: by [deleted user] (new)

Melaine, you're correct in several ways. As a writer of YA fantasy, I don't write to one age level. In fact, since the first in my new series was released in Jan 2010, the age range of readers goes from 8 years young to 88 years old. And all for the reasons you state.

In fact, here is a excerpt from the #1 Reviewer for Amazon Harriett Klausner

". . .With a strong nod towards Christopher Paolini's Inheritance fantasy saga, Allon is a superb coming of age quest fantasy. Ellis is a terrific teenager who eagerly wants to fight while his handlers demand flight. The support cast is solid especially the heroes die to defend the prince and the evil duet..."

http://www.allonbooks.com/

http://www.youtube.com/my_videos?feat...


message 19: by Alan (new)

Alan (coachmt) | 20 comments I'm in a similar boat with Shawn above. I wrote my first book with eighth grade characters, but I wrote it as something I'd like to read — not necessarily as YA. Kids who read aren't dumb and shouldn't be treated differently literarily.

Also, I'd point out what I believe to be the compass for the trend to YA reading by all ages: TV and movies. The speed at which we process (and have been forced to process) visual information has increased dramatically over the last 15-20 years. If you look at movies, television shows, and even commercials from the eighties, they seem slow. The camera dwells on subjects longer, action shots are generally from farther away, and everything just seems to plod along. Best example is to look at Star Wars (1977) after seeing Revenge of the Sith from a few years back. The differences are astounding.

Now think about literature. We read (generally) for entertainment. And our taste in reading usually follows our taste in movies and TV shows. We want our books to act like a movie. With the added benefit of being able to see the thoughts of some or all of the characters. YA authors, by and large, recognize this and write accordingly. Some mainstream authors have caught on as well, but most have been slower to make the change.

Just my two cents!


message 20: by [deleted user] (new)

You're right, Alan, writing has changed. Today's books must grab the reader immediately and hold it. Classic writers of yesteryear wouldn't do well in today's market since many wrote lengthy passages for newspapers that paid by the word -Alexander Dumas and Sir Conan Doyle for example.

I wrote for children's television in the 1980s so mine is a cinematic style that moves action and dialogue along.

ALLON was actually written for my daughter when she was in high school. Her friends became hooked, so I had a lot of interaction with teens while writing. I learned many things from those kids - how they think, feel, desire, hope - and tried to capture that in my stories.

Knowing your audience is critical to a writer.


message 21: by Teresa (new)

Teresa (teresainohio) after visiting my son's book fair at school, I notice the selection of books is so much more than what I had in school ( 20 yrs ago), through my teen years we had sweet valley high, baby sitters club and other books like that. Now they have such a large choice of books, even hunger games was there,

As with any genre there are good and bad writers, but with YA it has really exploded into new subjects and many of the authors are GOOD writers that write orginal stories not set themes like the above books.


message 22: by Teresa (new)

Teresa (teresainohio) Brenda wrote: "As a teacher-librarian, my start with reading YA books was over 15 years ago when I realized I needed to read the same books the kids read so I am familiar with the books/topics/themes/ect. I have..."

THis is how I came back to YA, I "previewed" the books for my 11 yr old son who reads about the 8th grade level ( in 5th), I wanted to make sure there wasn't sex, violence or other subject matter that wasn't right for him.

This is how I found disney keepers, artemis fowl, MAX, and others, while there I checked out the books and found twilight and never looked back. LOL


message 23: by Teresa (new)

Teresa (teresainohio) Fitz wrote: "When I was a teen, I used to laugh at adults on the train who were reading YA books because I was reading adult fiction then. But as I grew older, I got bored of the adult fiction because there was..."


This is another good thing about YA, I am a scout leader and when they see me reading a book with YA on the bind from the library, they come and ask me how is it, I can recommend them some good books and get another generation hooked on reading.


message 24: by [deleted user] (new)

Teresa, I did the same for my daughter in previewing books. Yes, there are good authors out there, but sometimes they don't make it onto schools reading lists. She graduated in 2005 and now is out of college.

Since being published, I've been visiting local schools and come to know several librarians. They wade through A LOT before anything gets to the kids.

Among the boys, ALLON has generated so much excitement one group is working on a video about how to turn it into a video game. How cool is that? If you'd like you can read more about that on my blog.

http://allonbooks-thekingdomofallon.b...


message 25: by Teresa (new)

Teresa (teresainohio) Shawn wrote: "Teresa, I did the same for my daughter in previewing books. Yes, there are good authors out there, but sometimes they don't make it onto schools reading lists. She graduated in 2005 and now is out ..."

Thank goodness for librarians : O We have a really good teen librarian at our branch, Jake (11) just goes to him and says I just finished the ____________ series, now what, but no yucky kissing or extreme violence please and he is right on the mark for books for him, Thank goodness cause if I had to read his books and then read mine I would never get mine read LOL but he did get me hooked on Percy.


message 26: by Natalee (new)

Natalee (nataleem00) | 43 comments Teresa, I had the same issue when my daughter was younger. She was reading at a much higher level and bored by middle-school age books. I was often previewing. And I think books should have a rating system because not all YA books are for younger teens. But that's a different topic entirely. Anyways, I even had my sister previewing since I couldnt keep up with my speed-reader daughter. Luckily, my sister and I both love YA so it was a job we didn't mind so much! I find YA refreshing... original stories and voices. I've read books that I typically wouldn't (dystopian in Hunger Games, historical fiction in A Northern Light) so I appreciate the new doors it's opened.


message 27: by [deleted user] (new)

Natalee, you're not the only wishing there was a different rating system for YA books. I ran into that problem with my publisher when I submitted my YA book.

I learned the problem is the general division of ISBN numbers. Age 18 is the division between children-including juvenile-and adults. I wrote ALLON for ages 14 & up, Teen fiction, which is a emerging market.But ALLON was tagged 9-12. (Although I've had readers as young as 8 and adults as old as 88 read it since there isn't offensive language, sex, etc in it.)

I argued that my book spanned the age division and some publishers manage to work around it, sadly mine wasn't one of them. Unfortunately, there aren't wider divisions in YA fiction yet.


message 28: by Teresa (new)

Teresa (teresainohio) Natalee wrote: "Teresa, I had the same issue when my daughter was younger. She was reading at a much higher level and bored by middle-school age books. I was often previewing. And I think books should have a ra..."

Maybe they should use the rating system they came up with for video games?


message 29: by Natalee (new)

Natalee (nataleem00) | 43 comments Teresa in Ohio wrote: "Natalee wrote: "Teresa, I had the same issue when my daughter was younger. She was reading at a much higher level and bored by middle-school age books. I was often previewing. And I think books ..."

That would be great! They need to do something!


message 30: by AH (new)

AH While a rating system might be a good idea, what would you want to rate for? In books like Percy Jackson, there is death and violence, yet it is geared to a young age. House of Night has teen sex, and some really bad choices. My friend has an 11 year old that has read Poison Study which has topics that may not be suitable for younger children. Today, children watch shows on TV during prime time (7-9PM) that are not suitable for younger audiences. I work with 3rd graders and I can not believe what TV shows and movies they have watched.

Here's what I believe: As a parent, you must guide your child's choices in reading. I never tell a child not to read a book (that usually backfires). I am lucky that I am an avid reader, so I generally preview the book to gauge its suitablitiy. If you do not have the time to read the book, this site is wonderful for multiple reviews of books.

Sometimes, if you are lucky, a book will bring up a topic that should be discussed by parent and child. Use that opportunity as a teaching experience for your children. Please don't rely on others to tell you what is or is not suitable for your child. Only you know what's best for your kids.


message 31: by Natalee (new)

Natalee (nataleem00) | 43 comments AH -
Good point regarding opening doors to discussion. By reading the same books my young teen does, I am able to discuss issues within the books. We've had several interesting conversations that started from a book. It is easy to talk about characters and their choices/experiences and guide my daughter at the same time.


message 32: by Teresa (new)

Teresa (teresainohio) AH wrote: "While a rating system might be a good idea, what would you want to rate for? In books like Percy Jackson, there is death and violence, yet it is geared to a young age. House of Night has teen sex, ..."

I agree, Instead of just lumping all YA under that caterogy, something on the back that says: sex scenes, volient death, scary monsters etc something like that.

I think each child, reader and especially parents must monitor, the reading material.

My son is 11 and already KNOWS without a doubt in his mind, his future will either be criminology(CSI), or forensics or maybe a combo under anthropology, so I found books for him on those subjects, know some of his friends cringe at the site of blood.

It goes back to when HP came out, some parents just out and out banned it because of the MAGIC theme, but once they learned more some changed those opinions.


message 33: by [deleted user] (new)

AH is right "Here's what I believe: As a parent, you must guide your child's choices in reading."

Like the tv and movie execs, the publishers leave much up to the parents. They throw out general divisions and genres, but the specifics are left to the individuals. Rates are nice, but it doesn't change a parent's involvement.

As a parent, I was in the same boat as those of you who are now previewing books for your kids, and with the same approach. Take your core beliefs and combine that with knowing your child, and help them to make wise choices. But also knowing, they will slip up and cave into peer pressure from time to time.

We also included: Pick your battles. Is this the hill I want to fight on today? Sometimes the answer was an emphatic Yes! other times No, while still others were 'wait and see what the kid does before jumping in.'

Again, it goes back to the core beliefs. Some things you can compromise on, others, not. I also told my daughter, I'm not concerned so much with the short term effect, as I am the long term and how you come out in the end.


message 34: by Brenda (new)

Brenda (brlemon) | 149 comments The problem with adding ratings for books is because one person's ideal of what constitutes a good ethical book is not another person's ideal. For example, I know of some high school parents who would strongly object to having their son/daugher read Hunger Games due to the violence and yet I also know of a couple of fifth-graders who were GIVEN Hunger Games by their parents to read. The question becomes where do you draw the line? Remember all the heated discussion with the Harry Potter books? What age group would you give them? And lets say you don't put any mention of violence or sexual content on a book because you feel it is so tame but yet a parent then gets upset that there was "no warning."

That is why it is so important to allow students/teenagers/kids to pick from a wide-variety of books. Let it be their choice. As a parent, YOU are the one who knows what is best for YOUR child.....but you may not know what is the best for someone else's.


message 35: by Kayzee (new)

Kayzee | 180 comments I keep to my motto, its not real, I could possibly change my mind when my 5 year old gets to that stage though lol


message 36: by Jim (new)

Jim | 13 comments Susie Hinton (SE Hinton) gave a talk in the 80s to the children's booksellers assoc. in which she talked about being one of the First y.a. authors. she wrote "The Outsiders" when she was seventeen because she didn't want to read any more horse books and "Kathy goes to the Prom" had no relevence someone growing up in OK City. that book was banned often because of violence. Mad. L'Engle's "House Like a Lotus" (1985?) has some issues w/homosexuality that the local book rep disagreed w/as such he recommended it not be stocked.
but rating the books like manga are? more problems. better to get to know a bookseller (they exist in chains but you have to look hard) or librarian or book review website. Goodreads being one of the better ones.


message 37: by Jim (new)

Jim | 13 comments some libraries put graphic novels in three sections. chldren/early teen, teen and adult. that requires space, a dedicated librarian/s and money.
B and N put books in two sections. children/ya - newbery winners, Narnia pretty much eveything over 100 pages. older ya - Twilight, ttfn. to ask them to split that again isn't going to work.
look at Borders, they've redone the sections such that nothing can be found.


message 38: by Angie, YA lovin mod!! (new)

Angie | 2687 comments Mod
Teresa in Ohio wrote: "Brenda wrote: "As a teacher-librarian, my start with reading YA books was over 15 years ago when I realized I needed to read the same books the kids read so I am familiar with the books/topics/them..."

What is disney keepers?


message 39: by Teresa (new)

Teresa (teresainohio) Brenda wrote: "The problem with adding ratings for books is because one person's ideal of what constitutes a good ethical book is not another person's ideal. For example, I know of some high school parents who w..."

I think we are beginning to overthink this : ) All I meant by a rating system, was put on it, has sex scenese, magical creatures, voilent death etc, then parents would have a clue as to whether it fits into their moral beliefs or not.

As an example I see many 3rd grade GIRLS reading Twilight, not sure how much they get, I have mention to parents is your child gifted in reading I see them with Twilight and thought that was more suited for older children. I didnt really mention the plot details, but many came back with thanks for telling me about Twilight, she is going to monitor the reading a little more closely or I discussed with my girl the power of being your own person, not relying on a man to come save you : ) or the whole vampire thing, etc


message 40: by Teresa (new)

Teresa (teresainohio) Angie wrote: "Teresa in Ohio wrote: "Brenda wrote: "As a teacher-librarian, my start with reading YA books was over 15 years ago when I realized I needed to read the same books the kids read so I am familiar wi..."

Disney After DarkDisney at Dawn


message 41: by [deleted user] (new)

What has made the 'rating' system even a topic for discussion is the push to put more adult themes in YA books. That trend began decades ago.

When I was a kid "Nancy Drew", Hardy Boys, Boxcar Kids,etc were the norm for kids books. My parents didn't have to scrutinize the books I read at school or brought home from the library, since there was still a taboo on what was acceptable in kids' books.

YA books began a serious emergence after the 1960s cultural revolution. YA really took off in the 1980s. Still, any theme considered 'adult' ie, sex, ultra violence and the like, that appeared in kids books were criticized, but gaining acceptance since some well-known authors were including such themes.
For example, Madeliene L'Engle pushed the boundaries in some of her YA books including "A House Like A Lotus" with sexual themes and lifestyle choices that weren't common.

Today's YA books are the opposite of when I was a kid and it is common to find adult themes in these books. I'm not saying whether it is right or wrong, however, kid's minds - then and now - are impressionable and maturity wise, some aren't capable of handling adult themes. Much more falls on today's parents to monitor.


message 42: by AH (new)

AH This has been quite the discussion. I am enjoying hearing everyone's opinions.

What I remember from when I was a kid was that there was no young adult book choices at all. You went from Nancy Drew to Sidney Sheldon. I remember my mother raising her eyebrows, but she never forbid me from reading those books.

With respect to stickering books with may contain sex or violence...What your definition of sex and violence may differ from mine. But if you find a book has objectional themes, use it as a teaching opportunity so that you can pass on your personal value system to your children.

I don't want people telling my kids which books they can read or not. That is my job. I'm happy that they are reading and will continue to encourage it.


message 43: by Jim (new)

Jim | 13 comments don't forget Judy Blume back there in the seventies...
As to the "when i was a kid" line of reasoning, when i was a kid there were no blacks in kids books, partly because blacks didn't read of course. nor were there any blacks in my elementary school or junior high, there were three or or four in high school and a couple kids from Africa at church. junior college in 1980 i studied to be a cop, there were sometimes two african americans in class one of them being the instructor.
now i walk by my old high school and there's a rainbow of students, same w/the junior college.
i like the books better now and the people at school.


message 44: by Jim (last edited Apr 23, 2010 01:33AM) (new)

Jim | 13 comments another "when i was a kid," there weren't any gay people in the books,or in high school. i guess that isn't true because one of my h.s. friends jumped off a bridge two years after graduation because of the hatred coming from his being gay. (see Prayers for Bobby) two years after that another friend dealt w/his sexuality by putting a gun in his mouth.
when i was a kid, children's books didn't have Jews in them but niether did school, we all sang Silent Night before leaving for Christmas break.
the american indians in kids books were either savages, child like - needing help from white men or Tonto, Kemo Sabe's faithful friend.
and when i was a kid the women in children's books were Mom, or a dippsy teen that needed a boy. but rarely real characters.


message 45: by [deleted user] (new)

Jim, I don't know where you grew up, but I was raised in New York City and Long Island. I encountered EVERY ethnic and race group in and out of school. In fact, it was during my formative school years that the civil rights movement and desegregation happened. I had friends of different races and was taught respect.

I was using "When I was a Kid" for "Comparison" in showing how books have changed and gone from 'shielding' kids from adult issue to thrusting those issues at kids in all forms of media. And that some of those kids emotionally and mentally can't handle it, then or now.

Time(eras) don't effect how a child inwardly develops physically or mentally - we all go through those same phases. But outward influences of those times can affect that development. And it's up to the parents to know their child and act accordingly, regardless of environment or outside influences.


message 46: by [deleted user] (new)

To all, my hope is we can keep this a civil discussion about the rating system of books, which is how it all began.

Labeling and/or ratings give general guidelines, but in the end, it remains the core values of the individual and knowledge of their child that make the ultimate decision on what or what not to allow their child to read.


message 47: by Alan (new)

Alan (coachmt) | 20 comments Seems to me a simple adoption of the system used for movies would suffice. After all, books are simply movies shown in our minds. : )


message 48: by Jim (new)

Jim | 13 comments 'After all, books are simply movies shown in our minds. : )"
thankfully w/out all the adds
Shawn, i'm a bit envious, i'm an hour outside of san fran, no color here. and i had to wait until my twenties to see mrs. basil e. frankweiler's museum.


message 49: by [deleted user] (new)

LOL, Alan & Jim


message 50: by Teresa (new)

Teresa (teresainohio) Shawn wrote: "Jim, I don't know where you grew up, but I was raised in New York City and Long Island. I encountered EVERY ethnic and race group in and out of school. In fact, it was during my formative school ye..."

They live in a world where information is just part of it. When I was growing up, news didn't get reported until the 5 pm paper arrived, or the 6 pm news came on, after that if something BIG happened in the world, you didnt know until 11 pm and then only what that news station wanted to report. Now if something happens it is there in their face right now. Great example was when Michael Jackson died, within hours it was NEWS everywhere and magazines had the story 2 days later on the newstand. During my teenage years I probably wouldn't even knew about news events Except the 6 pm news was on during dinner.

If we needed info for a school assignment, it required a trip to the library and using the card catalog. Now they just googled it, or request the material from the library and have it shipped in for pick up. Somedays I think this generation gets bombarded with too much info and instant access to everything and makes a parents job a little harder. I don't mean to keep things from them, but I guess with 9/11 the instant news wasn't quite like it was for Michael Jackson's death. I am NOT comparing these two events, just providing an example on how infomation is shared and how quickly it is obtained today.


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