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European Royalty Group Reads > Princesses: Books 1 - 2

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message 1: by Sara W (new)

Sara W (sarawesq) | 2153 comments Please discuss Book One: Youth, 1766 - 1783 and Book Two: Experience, 1783 - 1797 here.


message 2: by Sara W (new)

Sara W (sarawesq) | 2153 comments I'll be getting to this in a day or two (just finishing up Through a Glass Darkly). Anyone else planning to pick this up (or already have)? I know very, very little about any of the Georges of England, so this is new territory for me.


message 3: by Laura (new)

Laura | 99 comments I've had it for a while and would like to start reading it soon. Have one library book to finish first.


message 4: by Sara W (new)

Sara W (sarawesq) | 2153 comments It started off slowly, but it seems like it's starting to pick up as the girls get older (either that, or I'm getting more familiar with them so it seems more interesting). I generally like reading material written by the actual people involved (the book on Catherine the Great which we read here a while ago was a great example), but I wasn't caring much for all the letters used here. Nothing much seemed to be said in the letters - the girls missed whoever they were writing to, and they apologized for any misbehavior. The second section does seem to be getting better as they start discussing marriage possibilities for the oldest girls.

And omg, all those kids!


message 5: by Brigid (new)

Brigid (sillybrigid) | 19 comments Just wanted to drop in to say that I just joined this group today and immediately requested this book from the library. I look forward to discussing it with you. :)


message 6: by Sara W (new)

Sara W (sarawesq) | 2153 comments Welcome Brigid! We're glad you are here and will be joining our group read!


message 7: by Sara W (new)

Sara W (sarawesq) | 2153 comments Okay, I'm in the Fear chapter, and things are finally starting to get good (although, unfortunately, not for poor George III). I'm a little surprised how his mental breakdown seemed to paralyze his entire family (I'm just at the point when it's starting, so maybe someone steps up soon). The Queen's in bed and the girls aren't doing anything (literally - even skipping church). I guess the princesses were very sheltered, and Queen Charlotte was accustomed to staying out of anything political, but it seems like the family is about to collapse (I'm not familiar with this part of history except for knowing there is a regency at some point, so I have no idea what happens). It's sad how the Queen seems to be flat-out avoiding George. I can understand being shocked, but maybe her presence would have calmed him.


message 8: by Laura (new)

Laura | 99 comments Sara W wrote: "It started off slowly, but it seems like it's starting to pick up as the girls get older (either that, or I'm getting more familiar with them so it seems more interesting). I generally like readin..."

I have to agree. I just finished the first chapter and all those letter from the girls did get repetitive. What could kids really have to write about! There also doesn't seem to be much about their lives, just the Queen had another child and then another.


message 9: by Sara W (new)

Sara W (sarawesq) | 2153 comments Yeah, that first chapter could have been condensed to a page or two. I imagine it would scare some people off of the book. It's pretty decent now though (I think I'm in the Despond chapter or something like that - the chapter after Hope).


message 10: by Brigid (new)

Brigid (sillybrigid) | 19 comments I just finished the second book today. I actually really like the snippets from all the letters. I think it's fascinating how people -- even children -- wrote back then. Some of the letters are so revealing, while others are so flat. Royal and Augusta in particular have such apparent personalities in their correspondences.

I'm finding the book pretty interesting so far. I read Georgiana: Duchess of Devonshire in February, so in some ways this book presents the opposite of a Whig woman's life at the time. Georgiana was a friend of the Prince of Wales -- called Prinny, according to Amanda Foreman -- though she was about five years older than him and therefore nine years older than Princess Royal. All the same, seeing the period through the experiences of ladies of a similar age but with very different experiences is interesting.


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