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message 1: by [deleted user] (new)

After reading a couple of topics on Haiku, yesterday I googled what is Haiku, LOL, I had to ask a friend how to pronounce "Haiku". Anyway, I thought I would have a go & write some & share 3 with you all.

Dawn.

Morning Crows harking
Sun warms Australian bush
Life is worth living



cyclone

Thrashing cyclone looms
Impending destruction comes
Death awaits the fools.


Living Beauty

Mist on mountains high
Bellbirds sing through valleys green
Breathtaking beauty.


message 2: by Steven (new)

Steven (tbones) | 408 comments David wrote: "After reading a couple of topics on Haiku, yesterday I googled what is Haiku, LOL, I had to ask a friend how to pronounce "Haiku". Anyway, I thought I would have a go & write some & share 3 with yo..."

hey those are pretty good David...I might have to try my hand at this style of writing sometime. I did hear one once that said:
Man standing on toilet
Is high on the pot

That's not mine I read it somewhere once :o)


message 3: by Mandy (new)

Mandy Ooh, I don't think I've done one of these since primary school. Let's see if I can get it right:

Reading

Escaping this world
Comfort in reading the words
Being lost freely


message 4: by [deleted user] (new)

Hehehe!!..thank you Steven, quite amusing but not Haiku though.

well done Mandy, mate, at least you were taught some poetry at school, I never was, well for the short time I was there.


message 5: by Mandy (new)

Mandy I may have been taught it but I certainly didn't remember it, along with all the other little bits and pieces you don't use in everyday life. I had to look up what a haiku was ☺


message 6: by [deleted user] (new)

Wonderful thing is google eh!


message 7: by Mandy (new)

Mandy Oh yes, I often wonder what I would do without it, ha ha


message 8: by Steven (new)

Steven (tbones) | 408 comments David wrote: "Hehehe!!..thank you Steven, quite amusing but not Haiku though.

well done Mandy, mate, at least you were taught some poetry at school, I never was, well for the short time I was there."


yeah I figured it wasn't but I thought I'd throw a funny in there..I think that was like one of Jack or John Handy's things from Saturday Night Live.

I don't know if this one works but it was inspired by a funny thing I read online.

Adrenaline Rush

Escaping the zoo
Safety in a car
Tiger eats jogger


message 9: by Cecilia (new)

Cecilia | 167 comments each day dawns anew
arise and work, work work, work
life can be boring


message 10: by Steven (new)

Steven (tbones) | 408 comments Candyland

Colorfull cards
Tasty treats
Winner


message 11: by Cecilia (new)

Cecilia | 167 comments Steven...I liked your poem "Adrenaline Rush"...very cute!

Haiku typically has 3 lines with each line having the number of syllables being 5-7-5...in other words the first line has 5 syllables, second line has 7 syllables and last line has 5 syllables. So for your 'haiku' about the zoo...if your second line was something like "Safety in a car at last" it would have fit the 5-7-5 formula.

I really did enjoy Adrenaline Rush"...made me laugh! Thanks!

I think I'm having one of those days at work and want to go home to bed...blech.


message 12: by Steven (new)

Steven (tbones) | 408 comments Cecilia wrote: "Steven...I liked your poem "Adrenaline Rush"...very cute!

Haiku typically has 3 lines with each line having the number of syllables being 5-7-5...in other words the first line has 5 syllables, s..."


Thank you for the info...I am gonna practice now and change my Adrenaline Rush so it works...we should slap that on a shirt and where it to the zoo :o)

Have you read that thing online where it says a funny thing to do when you leave a zoo is run to your car yelling, "They're Loose Ahhhhh!!!!" could be a stress reliever


message 13: by Steven (new)

Steven (tbones) | 408 comments oh and so how might I fix my Candyland one..and if I didn't change that one what would that be catagorized as?


message 14: by Steven (new)

Steven (tbones) | 408 comments I think I fixed my other one...ok here goes...

Candyland

Colorfull cards shine
Tasty treats look so yummy
Winner in the end


message 15: by Steven (new)

Steven (tbones) | 408 comments Wrestling Nick

Maybe small outside
Slippery,quick,and tough
Gas escapes, he wins


message 16: by Cecilia (new)

Cecilia | 167 comments By George! He's got it!!! Okay...now you're on a roll, Steven. I really like haiku...it becomes addictive.

I also like your stress-relieving suggestion as you leave the zoo...:> Actually, yelling does seem to relieve some stress for me...well, not yelling at another person but in my car by myself on occassion...:> Scream Queen!!!!!!!


message 17: by Trentina (new)

Trentina Porter (radrine) | 5 comments Lol my dad's Steven, messaged me and got me to write one, so heres mine!

Cars

Never work quite right
Dead on the side of a road
Needs grandpa to tow


message 18: by Steven (new)

Steven (tbones) | 408 comments :o) that's funny...I think we all do it.
I think the other funny thing to do was, the next time you are at an ATM machine, when you get your receipt out yell out," I win!" and then walk away :o)

and yes this thing is very addictive...my daughter is online now and doing it as well :o)


message 19: by Trentina (new)

Trentina Porter (radrine) | 5 comments And its all your fault :-p well i gues its a little better then playing around on facbeook lol


message 20: by Cecilia (new)

Cecilia | 167 comments Good job Trentina! Yeah...it may be a little better than playing around on FB...but...:>


message 21: by Trentina (last edited Mar 16, 2010 12:14PM) (new)

Trentina Porter (radrine) | 5 comments Video games

The thrill of levels
Clash of swords, lanch of arrows
How can one grow bored?


message 22: by Steven (new)

Steven (tbones) | 408 comments Wow that's a cool one Trentina...send that into X-Box magazine :o)


message 23: by Trentina (new)

Trentina Porter (radrine) | 5 comments Lol that'd be cool ^^


message 24: by Mandy (new)

Mandy Steven, the "I win, I win" is my favourite of the bunch. Sounds like you got a similar email to myself. I loved it so much that I posted it on my blog, it was last week's Wordy Wednesday.


message 25: by Mandy (new)

Mandy Work

Bills need to be paid
Chained to a desk sunlight hours
Bring on night, sleep tight


message 26: by Elaine (last edited Oct 31, 2011 02:38PM) (new)

Elaine Campbell (goodreadscomnickthegreek11) I have posted a haiku in the Introduction to my new poetry blogsite:

Poetry Then and Now

Here it is:

from the chimney tops
smoke curls over the city
a gust of chill wind

This is traditional haiku. But as it has been adapted to Western tastes, we have a more liberal Western Haiku too. I haven't tried writing that yet. I kind of like the old way.

Does anybody write a tanka?


message 27: by [deleted user] (new)

G'day Elaine, here are a couple of my Tanka.


Whales

In this great expanse
Whales breach the oceans surface
show their weathered tail
then splash in magnificence
on their yearly migration.

David J Delaney
25/06/2010 ©


Lost life

Standing on the beach
their way of life unchanged
watch as white men land,
now wise elders hang their heads
for tribal ways won’t remain

David J Delaney
28/06/2010 ©


message 28: by Gemma (new)

Gemma Fasheun (gemmafash) | 15 comments well haiku poetry have many rules. There are all kind and types of them.

Haiku

The form of Haiku poetry originated from the Renga. The Haiku is a type of Japanese poetry that is short in length and has been around the longest. Basho, the famous Japanese poet, contributed to making this type of poetry well known. Even though it's survived all these years, people still enjoy writing this form of poetry today.

The structure of the Japanese Haiku has changed tremendously overtime. In the 15th century, the original form contained up to one hundred verses. Each verse still had a specific number of syllable, similar to the Renga. The first Haikus were created by two poets working together on one poem. The more recent Haiku consists of 17 syllables. Over time, the Haiku has changed it's structure, but one thing that has never changed is the set number of syllables.

Need some help and ideas to create your Haiku? In order to write a Haiku you must be in a state of relaxation. You might want to listen to some Japanese inspirational music to help your ideas start flowing. Haikus can be written about anything. Most people write their Haikus on nature and their daily lives. The three lines of the Haiku create a feeling which describes a poet's emotions.

Tanka

Another type of Japanese poetry is the Tanka. It's older than the famous Haiku, but not as well known. The Tanka has been a well known type of poetry in Japan for about 1300 years. After every special event or occasion a Tanka was written about the event. Tanka tends to be longer than the Haiku so it allows the poet to express his or her feelings in more depth. Typically the Tanka is written about one's feelings. In order to write this type of poetry, one must write about something they have a great love for and are passionate about. For example, nature, a place, family, a loved one, or their own daily life, most likely whatever you feel is right. A well written Tanka creates a vivid image which is related to emotions. This type of poetry gives poets the opportunity to express their own feelings in an unique way.

Renga

Another type of Japanese poetry is the Renga. Throughout history, Japanese poetry was continually changing. Over time, a technique developed so that two poets could enjoy creating one poem at the same time, this concept was known as the Renga. The idea behind the Renga is that one poet writes a section on their own ideas and the next poet adds the next section. Two poets combining their own ideas forming one poem, soon became a popular pass time and a form of entertainment. Many people thought of Renga as playing a competitive game. In order to participate in this game-like fashion, being a fast thinker with a good sense of humor was a requirement. People had parties were they used this form of entertainment. Renga poems are known to be longer than other types of Japanese poetry and they can reach up to 100 verses. Renga poetry is a fun form of entertainment that anyone can enjoy.

Haiku 1.
the raccoon twins peep
at the outside world to see
where their empire ends


message 29: by Gemma (new)

Gemma Fasheun (gemmafash) | 15 comments A Haiku has at least 17 syllables with 3 lines. The order of the syllables is 5,7,5.

The basic technique of writing a Tanka poem is that it has 31 syllables with 5 lines. The order of the syllables are 5,7,5,7,7.

The Renga has the same format as the Japanese Tanka. Renga poems can have as many verses as you want. Each verse has 31 syllables with 5 lines. The syllables per line are 5,7,5,7,7. It's practically the same as the Tanka, except for the fact that the Renga is like a competition.


message 30: by Ian (new)

Ian Loome (lhthomson) | 101 comments Seven, five, seven
relatively simple, no?
but also complex....


message 31: by Gemma (new)

Gemma Fasheun (gemmafash) | 15 comments very interesting L.H.

the sky is on fire
as slowly night approaches
to extinguish it

and

in the autumn's shadow
the Night stumble upon the Moon
I dance with the ants...

and

the night is coming slowly
don't you have a home to stay?
everyone afraid of soul eaters...

i think once i start writing them it's hard to stop.


message 32: by Karen (new)

Karen A. Wyle (kawyle) | 250 comments Will bubbles of words
Rise to the surface and pop
While I cook my soup?


message 33: by Gemma (new)

Gemma Fasheun (gemmafash) | 15 comments i like it. you make me smile Karen.


message 34: by Ian (new)

Ian Loome (lhthomson) | 101 comments She percolates a
big beaming smile from Gemma,
with her nifty verse


message 35: by Gemma (new)

Gemma Fasheun (gemmafash) | 15 comments ups what means nifty?
my feet gets colder
with each minute gone.

miss my hubby
I need more than one hug
silence sleeps well in my bed.


message 36: by Ian (new)

Ian Loome (lhthomson) | 101 comments Unbearable, now
the tension of solitude,
enveloping her


message 37: by Gemma (new)

Gemma Fasheun (gemmafash) | 15 comments food, warmth, money and love
is all I need to be happy
a new person I wanna be.


message 38: by Ian (last edited Feb 02, 2012 04:48PM) (new)

Ian Loome (lhthomson) | 101 comments Necessity is
the mother of invention,
but also despair


message 39: by Tony (new)

Tony Talbot stripped and gutted
discarded in a ditch
death of a mattress


our tears are oceans
saltwater seas of sorrow
grief a black beach


message 40: by Tony (new)

Tony Talbot The Swan

Golden liquid drops
Silver on shining white back
Snowfall in summer


message 41: by Andrea (new)

Andrea Jackson (paperbackdiva) | 108 comments Haikus can be a fun exercise.

Need is a hole that
Must be filled.Want would be nice
to have but not missed


message 42: by Andrea (new)

Andrea Jackson (paperbackdiva) | 108 comments She was drawn to him.
Something in him called to her.
What will she answer?


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