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War in General > Manuals of War

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message 1: by Martin Lamb, Head Moderator (new)

Martin Lamb | 212 comments Mod
Doctrines describing the technique and skill required in war. What are some noteable doctrines?


message 2: by Martin Lamb, Head Moderator (new)

Martin Lamb | 212 comments Mod
Two very noteable manuals of war. Sun Tzu is an easier read than Carl von Clausewitz. Never the less they are both great books and are still apllicable today.

The Art of War by Sun Tzu Sun Tzu Sun Tzu

Description:
Conflict is an inevitable part of life, according to this ancient Chinese classic of strategy, but everything necessary to deal with conflict wisely, honorably, victoriously, is already present within us. Compiled more than two thousand years ago by a mysterious warrior-philosopher, The Art of War is still perhaps the most prestigious and influential book of strategy in the world, as eagerly studied in Asia by modern politicians and executives as it has been by military leaders since ancient times. As a study of the anatomy of organizations in conflict, The Art of War applies to competition and conflict in general, on every level from the interpersonal to the international. Its aim is invincibility, victory without battle, and unassailable strength through understanding the physics, politics, and psychology of conflict.

On War by Carl Von Clausewitz Carl Von Clausewitz Carl Von Clausewitz

Description:
The most significant attempt in Western history to understand war, both in its internal dynamics and as an instrument of policy, Carl von Clausewitz's book stands as one of the world's great classic works on the subject.


message 3: by Silvana (new)

Silvana (silvaubrey) I agree, Sun Tzu's Art of War is far much easier to read than Clausewitz. But Clausewitz's work is more extensive and complete.

How about Napoleon, Caesar and Alexander? I know some books have been written on their military maxims.


message 4: by Martin Lamb, Head Moderator (new)

Martin Lamb | 212 comments Mod
Sun Tzu I finished in a day, but Clausewitz is taking me awhile to finish. I do agree with you though, Clausewitz's work is a more complete work that covers a variety of details.I haven't read any books by Napolean, Caesar or Alexander unfortunately. Is there any books that you would recommend by them?


message 5: by Matt, Assistant Moderator - Naval History (new)

Matt | 31 comments Mod
A doctrine manual/classic is Alfred Thayer Mahan's The Influence of Sea Poewr Upon History The Influence of Sea Power Upon History, 1660-1783 by Alfred Thayer Mahan This is the book that helped propel the US Navy into a building the Great White Fleet


message 6: by Martin Lamb, Head Moderator (new)

Martin Lamb | 212 comments Mod
Is this book about the navy created under President Theodore Roosevelt?


message 7: by Matt, Assistant Moderator - Naval History (new)

Matt | 31 comments Mod
No it was the impetus for the creation of the Navy by President Chester A. Arthur (the Presidental Father of the Modern Navy) and following presidents. It is a good study of early naval history.


message 8: by Martin Lamb, Head Moderator (new)

Martin Lamb | 212 comments Mod
What was the Great White Fleet under Theodore Roosevelt?


message 9: by Matt, Assistant Moderator - Naval History (new)

Matt | 31 comments Mod
It was a fleet of pre dreadnoughts that were sent around the world to show the world's powers that the US had a modern fleet. Roosevelt tried to get Congress to fund the trip but Congress refused. So to get around Congress Roosevelt sent the fleet on the journey by using the allocated Navy budget with the idea that once the fleet was gone Congress would want the fleet back and pay for them to come back. Since Congress didn't want to look silly for cancelling a well publicized event as the Navy's “World Tour” Congress funded the rest of the tour. It was a success in that the US moved from a second rate power to a solid but low first rate power. Europe in particular had to take notice of the US and their fleet. During this time Europe was also infatuated with Mahan and his theories on sea power. The Great White Fleet just by being a fleet in being supported Mahan's theories not only to the US government but to the world in particular Germany and England.


message 10: by Paul (new)

Paul Pellicci That was quite an abuse of power.


message 11: by Matt, Assistant Moderator - Naval History (new)

Matt | 31 comments Mod
It was but TR expanded the presidency from caretaker status of the likes of Grant and the rest into the beginning stages of what is today.


message 12: by Martin Lamb, Head Moderator (new)

Martin Lamb | 212 comments Mod
On War is a tough read. It is very dry but it is ver thourough in its explanation.


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