LLED, Spring 2010 discussion

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Award announcements

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message 1: by Typhani (new)

Typhani (tjr0416) | 20 comments Non-traditional parents


message 2: by Chelsea (last edited Mar 19, 2010 08:09AM) (new)

Chelsea | 12 comments My award will be called “wordless stories/imagination award.” My award will be given to the author for the best children’s book representing wordless pictures. The genre is wordless picture books that are most clearly reliant on illustrations. This book should consist of superior illustrations that allow children to use and explore their imaginations. The illustrations should allow the children to be able to use their imagination and explain what they see. The expected age range of readers for the best children’s book representing wordless pictures should be for elementary-aged children. As Rebecca J Lukens states in, A Critical Handbook of Children’s Literature, “Wordless books provide complexity and detail, as well as continuity and consistency (Lukens pg. 66.) “Illustration may create a frame for a picture book (Lukens, pg. 43). “When pictures tell it all, words are sometimes unnecessary and even without words, protagonist and action can be believable (Lukens pg. 66). I chose this award because wordless picture books give children a chance to think outside of the box and use their imagination. Nominations should be posted no later than Thursday March 25, 2010.


message 3: by Katee (last edited Mar 19, 2010 02:32PM) (new)

Katee | 18 comments My award will be called the "Best Message Award." This award will be given to the author of the children's picture book that sends the best message. As Lukens states in A Critical Handbook of Children's Literature, "Big ideas may appear in stories for the young" (p 142). For example, a book that shows that a brother and a sister shouldn't fight but be friends instead, or shows the values of responsibility, volunteering, etc. Lukens also says, "Even a simple story can make a significant point" (p 54). This idea will not be lost in my award. All stories, big and small, will be considered. Nominations will be accepted until Thursday March 25, 2010.


message 4: by Teeny Probst (new)

Teeny Probst | 23 comments My award will be given to the best children’s picture book that deals with wars that the United State has been involved in during the past and present. These wars could range as far back as the Civil War to the current War on Terrorism that is taking place in the Middle East.


message 5: by Josh (last edited Mar 22, 2010 04:31PM) (new)

Josh Wagner | 4 comments My award will be called the "Historical Relevance award." It will be given to the best children's book with a focus on historical events. It should be something that could be integrated into a lesson for social studies/history in the classroom (i.e. focus on a war, civil rights movement, etc). It can book a book for any elementary grade (k-6). Also, the book may be either fiction or non-fiction, as long as the context of the story still conveys an accurate historical message (i.e. a book taking place during an actual historical event, conveys accurate feelings/actions/etc of the time, even if the main character(s) are themselves fictional). As Lukens says on page 17 of "Children's Literature," "Well-written historical fiction often rouses within the reader a question that begs to be answered: How much of this is true?" Because of this, historical fiction books are included as possible nominees for this award, as well as historical non-fiction. Nominations will be accepted until Thursday, March 25, 2010.


message 6: by Kevin (last edited Mar 19, 2010 02:16PM) (new)

Kevin Ryan | 10 comments My award will be given to the children's book that displays great care and respect for all kinds of animals. I will call the award I want to give is the Children's Humanitarian Award. These books can include all animals, not just domesticated animals. The age range of the books can vary within K-6 because I believe all children should be aware of the proper treatment of all animals.


message 7: by Kristin (new)

Kristin | 11 comments My award will be the Best Children's Adventure Award and will go to the best children's literature book about children going on or having an adventure. I'm looking for a picture book that is for elementary-age children. I would like it to have main characters that are going on a real adventure or are involved in something exciting that could be considered an adventure. Lukens says on p. 8 of Children's Literature, "Literature provides vicarious experiences...the possibilities for us to live lives other than our own are infinite..." I want the award to go to a book that does that.


message 8: by Teeny Probst (new)

Teeny Probst | 23 comments My award, the Cost of Freedom award, will be given to the best children’s picture book that deals with wars that the United States has been involved in during the past and present that helped secure the idea of freedom, peace, and safety throughout our nation. These wars could range as far back as the Civil War to the current War on Terrorism that is taking place in the Middle East. The book can show the brutality of war, but in a fashion appropriate for an elementary student or classroom. Furthermore, the book can be one’s personal account from a war or a general, simplistic, outline of a particular war, or etc. As Lehr states in her book titled : A Critical Handbook of Children’s Literature that “well-written historical fiction often rouses within the reader a question that begs to be answered: how much of this is true?” (17) A great selection for this award may spark a children’s curiosity and cause him or her to question the events, the people, and etc. Overall, The wars that the United States have been involved in have shaped the nation that we are today and it is important for young children to see what our country and its citizens were willing to do and sacrifice to preserve freedom, peace, and safety within our states.


message 9: by Typhani (new)

Typhani (tjr0416) | 20 comments Nomination for Stephanie: Saying Goodbye to Lulu by Corinne Demas


message 10: by Typhani (new)

Typhani (tjr0416) | 20 comments Nomination for Jayme: Rosa by Nikki Giovanni


message 11: by Typhani (new)

Typhani (tjr0416) | 20 comments Nomination for Heidi: The Paper Bag Princess by Robert M. Munsch


message 12: by Typhani (new)

Typhani (tjr0416) | 20 comments Nomination for Mike: A Weekend with Wendell by Kevin Henkes


message 13: by Typhani (new)

Typhani (tjr0416) | 20 comments Nomination for Mallori: Arnie and the New Kid


message 14: by Katee (new)

Katee | 18 comments Nomination for Jess T: Where the Wild Things Are by Maurice Sendak


message 15: by Katee (last edited Mar 25, 2010 07:07AM) (new)

Katee | 18 comments Nomination for Sarah: Romeow and Drooliet by Nina Laden


message 16: by Katee (new)

Katee | 18 comments Nomination for Chelsea: Flotsam by David Weisner


message 17: by Katee (new)

Katee | 18 comments Nomination for Jess M: The Very Hungry Caterpillar By Eric Carle


message 18: by Katee (new)

Katee | 18 comments Nomination for Tamera: The Stinky Cheese Man and Other Fairly Stupid Tales by Jon Scieszka and Lane Smith


message 19: by Katee (last edited Mar 25, 2010 07:11AM) (new)

Katee | 18 comments Nomination for Josh: Klondike Gold by Alice Provensen


message 20: by Typhani (new)

Typhani (tjr0416) | 20 comments Nomination for Kristin: Where the Wild Things Are by Maurice Sendak


message 21: by Katee (new)

Katee | 18 comments Nomination for Kevin: Annie and the Wild Animals by Jan Brett


message 22: by Katee (last edited Mar 25, 2010 07:11AM) (new)

Katee | 18 comments Nomination for Teeny: Pink and Say by Patricia Polacco


message 23: by Typhani (new)

Typhani (tjr0416) | 20 comments Nomination for Andrew: Lon Po Po by Ed Young


message 24: by Typhani (new)

Typhani (tjr0416) | 20 comments My award, which will be called the “Beauty of Non-Traditional Parents Award,” will be given to the author who best portrays the idea of how non-traditional parents affect children and society. The book should be a picture book and for ages 5-12. The book should be about how a character lives with people who aren’t necessarily in a normal living situation, characters of the same sex who raise a family, or a child who learns how to accept their parents for who they are even if they are the same sex. Fletcher states in his chapter about realism that, “novels about social issues showed the character- usually the protagonist, or central character-encountering a kind of problem engendered by society, like discrimination because of race, gender, or social position” (15). I chose my topic because I am very passionate about non-traditional parents being wonderful and deserving to have a chance at raising a family. Discrimination is obviously still evident in society and always will be. People need to be aware that it is okay to be different. Just because two parents aren’t in a heterosexual relationship, that doesn’t mean they won’t be good parents. I want to choose a book that shows that despite what society thinks, these parents can be the best in the world. Parts of the book can include how the characters deal with the situations, how they overcome it, and how other people view it. Nominations should be posted by Monday, March 22, 2010.


message 25: by Typhani (new)

Typhani (tjr0416) | 20 comments Nomination for Andrew: Lon Po Po by Ed Young


message 26: by Jessica (last edited Mar 21, 2010 09:34AM) (new)

Jessica (jessicatirko) | 12 comments " A World of my Own " - award

My award will be given to the author who writes the best children's book that represents a child's escape from reality.

This award requires a children’s book that, “creates another world for characters and readers, asking that readers believe this other world could and does exist within the framework of the book. The acceptance of this other world requires of the writer an ability to make the imaginary universe so credible, ‘so solidly grounded in reality,’ as Madeleline L’Engle says, that we wish it were all true; for sheer pleasure, we believe.” (Lehr 20)

The genre of book that will most likely receive this award will be fantasy. When a child picks up a book they should be able to escape from whatever world they live in, and realize that anythings possible. My award is intended to honor an author that allows the child to do just that. The power of words can change a child's life.

Nominations for this award will be accepted until 11:59pm on Wednesday March 23rd, 2010.


message 27: by Jayme (new)

Jayme | 14 comments Nomination for Kristin: Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll


message 28: by Jayme (new)

Jayme | 14 comments Nomination for Stephanie: I Miss You: A First Look at Death


message 29: by Jayme (new)

Jayme | 14 comments Nomination for Mallori: Russ and the Firehouse by Janet Rickert


message 30: by Jayme (new)

Jayme | 14 comments Nomination for Heidi: The Girl Who Wanted to Hunt by Emery Bernhard


message 31: by Jayme (new)

Jayme | 14 comments Nomination for Mike: Stand Tall Molly Lou Mellon


message 32: by Andrew (new)

Andrew | 11 comments Nomination for Brooke: "Waiting for May" by Janet Morgan Stoeke


message 33: by Jessica (last edited Mar 24, 2010 09:03AM) (new)

Jessica Minnoia | 10 comments Award for Kevin: "Hey! Get Off Our Train by John Burningham. This is a fantasy picture book where a boy goes on a train ride and picks up various animals along the way. Each time a new animals gets on board, the other animals yell "Hey, Get off our train." The various animals then plead their case why they should be allowed on ( the elephant is afraid they are coming to cut his tusks off, a seal wants to come because of water pollution, etc).


message 34: by Sarah (last edited Mar 22, 2010 06:27PM) (new)

Sarah | 14 comments The Balto Book Award

The Balto Book Award will be bestowed to the book that best exhibits a dog as a character involved in the plot of a book. I chose this topic for my award because I have always loved animals, but I was never able to have any growing up. Therefore, the closest I could get to dogs was through books. Reading about dogs helped me develop my love of reading and opened me up to other types of literature.

My book award is about the literary elements of character. For this award, one of the main characters of the nominated books must be a dog and play a role in the book. Rebecca Lukens states on page 76 of A Critical Handbook of Children's Literature, “In literature, however, the term character is used to mean a person, or in the case of children’s literature, sometimes a personified animal or object. Each of the living beings in a story, play, or poem is a character.” Although Lukens states that a personified animals may be a character, the animal or in this case a dog doesn’t always have to be personified, such as in a non-fiction story. For this award, the literary element of character must be present in the form of a dog.

The nominated books must be pictures books for elementary school-aged students and may be fiction or non-fiction. Dogs come in all shapes, sizes, and colors; therefore, the nominated books could be fiction or non-fiction and for kindergarteners or sixth grade students. Nominations are due no later than March 25, 2010.


message 35: by Tamara (last edited Mar 23, 2010 07:44AM) (new)

Tamara | 11 comments For my book award, I have chosen the topic of fractured fairytales in children's literature, and I will be presenting an award called the Fractail Fairytured. I decided to choose this topic because these books are exciting and interesting. In a fractured fairytale, an author takes a fairytale and adds a twist to the plot or characters. These books are filled with magic and fantasy, which according to Lukens, fantasy requires "the willing suspension of disbelief" (Lukens 20). The authors of these stories attempt to pull their readers into another world by using fantasy, and have the readers believing that these places exist within the book (Lukens 20). This award will be given to an author who displays a fun and exciting fractured fairytale, and a story that will catch the attention of young, elementary readers. Nominations are due for this award by March 25, 2010.


message 36: by Teeny Probst (new)

Teeny Probst | 23 comments Nomination for Josh: Minty : a story of young Harriet Tubman by
Schroeder, Alan.


message 37: by Teeny Probst (new)

Teeny Probst | 23 comments Nomination for Jess M is Ice Bear in the Steps of a Polar Bear


message 38: by Teeny Probst (new)

Teeny Probst | 23 comments Nomination for Sarah is Stanley's party written by Linda Bailey ;and illustrated by Bill Slavin.


message 39: by Sarah (last edited Mar 23, 2010 10:10AM) (new)

Sarah | 14 comments Nomination for Jess T.: Jumanji by Chris Van Allsburg

Nomination for Tamara: Three Little Wolves and the Big Bad Pig by Eugene Trivizas

Nomination for Jess M.: Snowflake Bentley by Jacqueline Briggs

Nomination for Katee: Friends to the End by Bradley Trevor Greive

Nomination for Josh: Martin's Big Words: The Life of Martin Luther King Jr. by Doreen Rappaport

Nomination for Chelsea: The Snowman by Raymond Briggs

Nomination for Kevin: The Stray Dog by Marc Simont

Nomination for Teeny: Pink and Say by Patricia Polacco


message 40: by Teeny Probst (new)

Teeny Probst | 23 comments My nomination for Katee is Frog and toad are friends by Lobel, Arnold.


message 41: by Teeny Probst (new)

Teeny Probst | 23 comments My Nomination for Katee is The Berenstain Bears lend a helping hand
by Stan Berenstain.


message 42: by Teeny Probst (new)

Teeny Probst | 23 comments My nomination for Chelsea is Free Fall by David Wienser, Tuesday by David Wiesner, and Flotsam by David Wiesner.


message 43: by Teeny Probst (new)

Teeny Probst | 23 comments My nomination for Kevin is Charlotte's Web by E.B. White


message 44: by Teeny Probst (new)

Teeny Probst | 23 comments My nomination for Tamara is the Paper Bag Princess.


message 45: by Teeny Probst (new)

Teeny Probst | 23 comments My nomination for Sarah is the Polar Express.


message 46: by Jessica (new)

Jessica Minnoia | 10 comments Nomination for Josh: The Babe & I by David A. Adler


message 47: by Jessica (last edited Mar 28, 2010 01:19PM) (new)

Jessica (jessicatirko) | 12 comments Nomination for Kevin: Click, Clack, Moo; Cows That Type by Doreen Cronin

This is such a clever idea for a children's book! The story of a group of cows that discover how to use a type writer to communicate with their owner, Farmer Brown. If you were a cow, what would you ask for? After going on strike and no longer producing goods, it is not long before the cow's get what they want. The other animals soon realize the power of the typewriter and decide to make a few orders for themselves. Read to find out what these silly demands are and how Farmer Brown reacts to the letters from his farm animals.

I selected this story for your award because it shows animals standing up for themselves. It shows that animals have rights too.


message 48: by Josh (new)

Josh Wagner | 4 comments Nominations for book awards:

Heidi: Paperbag Princess
Mallori: My Sister is Different
Kristin: A Tree for me and Where are you Going, Manyoni?
Typhani: The Father Who Had Ten Children
Jayme: Martin Luther King Day
Mike: Buzz, Buzz, Buzz, Went the Bumblebee
Sarah: No Roses for Henry and Henry the Dirty Dog
Jess M: Earth, Sky, and Beyond
Andrew: The Skeleton in the Closet
Teeny: A Boy at War
Jack: Julius
Jess T: The Raft
Tamara: Rumpelstiltskin's Daughter


message 49: by Kevin (new)

Kevin Ryan | 10 comments Nomination for Jess T.- Power and Glory by Emily Rodde
Nomination for Teeny- Duel of the Ironclads by Patrick O'Brian
Nomination for Josh- Amelia and Eleanor Go for a Ride by Munoz Ryan
Nomination for Katee- Listen to Me by Barbara J. Neasi
Nomination for Chelsea- Free Fall by David Wiesner
Nomination for Jess M.- My Light by Molly Bang
Nomination for Tamara- Where's the Big Bad Wolf? by Eileen Christelow
Nomination for Sarah- How to Talk to Your Dog by Jean Craighead George


message 50: by Sarah (new)

Sarah | 14 comments Nomination for Jessica Minnoia: Snowflake Bentley
By Jacqueline Briggs Martin

Snowflake Bentley is the story about the man who first photographed snowflakes, Wilson Bentley. The picture book describes how Bentley discovered the universal shape of a snowflake and how no two snowflakes are alike. This biography of Bentley could be incorporated into a science lesson about weather, precipitation, or winter. This picture book would be more interesting than a textbook and would allow children to feel like they were reading a story rather than learning science. Snowflake Bentley is the best choice for a non-fiction picture book for science and deserving of The Young Einstein Award.

Nomination for Chelsea: Pancakes for Breakfast
By Tomie DePaola

Pancakes for Breakfast is a story about a woman trying to make pancakes for breakfast. She doesn’t have all of the ingredients, so she must go and collect the ingredients. Even without words, the story is told clearly by the illustrations in the book. The book doesn’t need words and allows children to use their own imaginations to explain the plot of the story. Pancakes for Breakfast is worthy of the Wordless Stories/Imagination Award.

Nomination for Katee: If I Only Had A Green Nose
By Max Lucado

If I Only Had A Green Nose is a tale about trying to fit in. Punchinello and his friends have their noses painted so that others accept them. They realize that they don’t want or need to be like everybody else, and it is okay to be oneself. The message in this story is that every person is unique and different, and being unique and different is okay. If I Only Had A Green Nose is an exemplary choice for the Best Message Award.

Nomination for Josh: Martin’s Big Words: The Life of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
By Doreen Rappaport

Martin’s Big Words: The Life of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. is a biography of the great Civil Rights Movement leader, Martin Luther King, Jr. The story describes events of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s life, such as seeing ‘White Only’ signs as a boy to the Montgomery Bus Boycott. The book is focused on historical events of the Civil Rights Movement and the life of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. This book could easily be incorporated into classroom lessons, such as lessons about the Civil Rights Movement, Black History Month, the 1960s, great leaders or speakers, or American heroes. Martin’s Big Words: The Life of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. is a worthy choice for the Historical Relevance Award.

Nomination for Kevin: Nubs: The True Story of a Mutt, a Marine, & a Miracle
By Major Brian Dennis, Kirby Larson, and Mary Nethery

Nubs: The True Story of a Mutt, a Marine, & a Miracle is a story about a soldier that befriends a dog in Iraq. The two become nearly inseparable, and they share food and often play. The dog makes a 70-mile trek to be with the soldier through Iraq. The soldier saves the dog from the hard living conditions and has him sent back to the United States. This story truly shows care and respect for animals. This heartwarming story is very deserving of the Children’s Humanitarian Award.

Nomination for Tamara: The Three Little Wolves and the Big Bad Pig
By Eugene Trivizas

The Three Little Wolves and the Big Bad Pig is a must read fractured fairytale. The roles of the traditional story are reversed in this twisted tale. The three little wolves try to stay protected from the big bad pig by building houses out of different building materials. Usually, the big bad pig destroys the house. However, the manners in which he does this will shock the reader. All in all, this fractured fairytale is the best candidate for and deserving of the Fractailed Fairyture Award.

Nomination for Teeny: Pink and Say
By Patricia Polacco

Pink and Say is a tale of a friendship that occurs during the Civil War. Pink, a slave, rescues Say and brings him home. Say is nursed back to health, and the boys form a friendship. The boys try to meet back up with the Union Army, but they are captured by the Confederates and taken to Andersonville. Say is released in a few months weighing less than 100 pounds, but Pink doesn’t make it out alive. This book is a retelling of a true story passed down through a family and remembers the bravery of Pinkus Aylee during the Civil War. Pink and Say is a story deserving of the Cost of Freedom Award.

Nomination for Jess Tirko: Jumanji
By Chris Van Allsburg

Jumanji is a fantasy story about a board game that comes to life for two children, Peter and Judy. Peter and Judy begin playing a board game called Jumanji. The game comes to life when lions, a snake, a volcano, a stampede, and more come to life in their home. The game takes over their house, and they can’t get rid of the things until someone wins. Judy wins and shouts, “Jumanji.” Thus, she ends the game and everything returns to normal. This book allows children to imagine that they are apart of this new world that Judy and Peter are in and feel as if they too are playing Jumanji. Jumanji is a commendable recommendation for the ‘A World of My Own’ Award.


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