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The Black Plague and the Guttenberg Bible

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message 1: by JanetTronstad (new)

JanetTronstad Author Tronstad | 2759 comments Mod
I went to the Huntington Gardens & Library here (just a mile from me). I went in with some friends and we went to see the Guttenberg Bible (I may have that spelled wrong -- anyway it's the first Bible done with a printing press). It reminded me of a book I read recently on the Black Plague (such a terrible thing). The author ended the book by mentioning that without the Black Plague we wouldn't have had the printing press (or, at least, we wouldn't have had it until hundreds of years later). The reduced population made wages go up so things like a printing press became cost-effective. It caused me to think about the cause and effect of things. Terrible things can have some good effects (not saying they make up for the terrible thing, just that life is such a mixture). Anyway -- anyone else seen any old books? Did you feel the same kind of reverence I felt looking at that Guttenberg Bible -- it almost felt like I was in an old monastry.


message 2: by Jennifer (new)

Jennifer (jennafraugh) | 4102 comments hmmm...good question. I don't think I've ever seen an old book that I can remember. I do remember seeing the constitution behind class and the Bill of Rights and being in awe of that...just being in a Historical place where the founding fathers walked, rode horses, came up with the way to govern the country puts you in awe. When you get down to it and think, i'm walkind the same walk or down the same hall they did, it's pretty awesome!

And the Holocaust Museum...spent four hours on just one floor and there's 6. Obviously didn't get to see it all, but just seeing the simulation that they have of reinacting their lives. They give you a name when you walk in and at the end of walking through "their world" you find out if you made it out alive or died. Talk about putting things into perspective.


message 3: by JanetTronstad (new)

JanetTronstad Author Tronstad | 2759 comments Mod
Wow -- that's a powerful museum. I haven't been there, but have heard it is impressive.


message 4: by Jennifer (last edited Mar 04, 2010 05:20PM) (new)

Jennifer (jennafraugh) | 4102 comments Yup...so is the Vietnam Memorial Wall. Definitley brings a huge hush over whoever visits. The Arlington Cemetery is another one that gives you one of those awe moments...especially if you go to the changing of the guards for the Tomb of the unknown soldier. (Well, not unknown any longer)


message 5: by Sheila (new)

Sheila | 8 comments The joys of going to college in Cambridge England. Lots and lots of old books and beautiful libraries to house them.


message 6: by JanetTronstad (new)

JanetTronstad Author Tronstad | 2759 comments Mod
Shiela -- there's lots of other really old books at the Huntington. It makes me feel enriched just to be in the same room with them. When I think of how precious those old books were to their owners and how many books I have, I am very grateful.


message 7: by Janet (new)

Janet Dean | 466 comments Janet Tronstad wrote: "I went to the Huntington Gardens & Library here (just a mile from me). I went in with some friends and we went to see the Guttenberg Bible (I may have that spelled wrong -- anyway it's the first B..."

Janet, I saw the Gutenberg Bible in the Library of Congress in Washington D.C. It amazed me that our books are also there. Well, maybe not in hard copy but the books we write are copyrighted and catalogued by the Library of Congress. The building's interior gorgeous and attached to the Capitol. If you get to DC be sure and visit.


message 8: by Janet (new)

Janet Dean | 466 comments Jennifer wrote: "hmmm...good question. I don't think I've ever seen an old book that I can remember. I do remember seeing the constitution behind class and the Bill of Rights and being in awe of that...just being i..."

The Holocaust museum sounds very emotional, Jennifer. I didn't have time to visit but will when I go again.


message 9: by Janet (new)

Janet Dean | 466 comments The WW11 Memorial was impressive too. So many men and women died in that war! I had no idea until I visited.


message 10: by Ausjenny (new)

Ausjenny | 4927 comments I went to the australian war memorial in Canbera and it was really cool. they have a wall with all the diggers who have lost there lives in all the wars. I have 2 great uncles who died in WW1 and was able to see there names on the wall


message 11: by Janet (new)

Janet Dean | 466 comments You must've felt good to see your great uncles' sacrifice was remembered, Jenny. We owe our freedom to those men and women who serve in the military.


message 12: by Jennifer (new)

Jennifer (jennafraugh) | 4102 comments Janet Dean wrote: "Jennifer wrote: "hmmm...good question. I don't think I've ever seen an old book that I can remember. I do remember seeing the constitution behind class and the Bill of Rights and being in awe of th..."

It is...I cried through the video! But, then again, I cry at anything! :D


message 13: by Jennifer (new)

Jennifer (jennafraugh) | 4102 comments Ausjenny wrote: "I went to the australian war memorial in Canbera and it was really cool. they have a wall with all the diggers who have lost there lives in all the wars. I have 2 great uncles who died in WW1 and w..."

That's really cool! My grandfather was a top gunner in WW2. We've got his wings and a medal or two of his. Still in the original case and everything.


message 14: by JanetTronstad (new)

JanetTronstad Author Tronstad | 2759 comments Mod
My father was in the tail-end of WWII and, fortunately, was wounded soon over he got to the front (the wound was not serious, but impeded his walking -- if he hadn't been in the hospital then he would have been killed as his unit was almost wiped out). He's in his mid-80's now and talks about the war just a little. The one thing that he always seems to mention is that, by the time he entered the war, the Germans were needing more soldiers so they had 'soldiers' who were really boys of twelve or thirteen. My father was only eighteen himself so it struck him as so sad that those boys died.


message 15: by Jennifer (new)

Jennifer (jennafraugh) | 4102 comments Janet Tronstad wrote: "My father was in the tail-end of WWII and, fortunately, was wounded soon over he got to the front (the wound was not serious, but impeded his walking -- if he hadn't been in the hospital then he wo..."

Yeah, my grandfather actually got saved while flying his plan on a mission. Ducked to get something that fell and when he sat back up there was a hole where his head should've been and shrapnel flying all over the place. Made him pray right then and there and get his life straight with God. Don't blame him one bit!

It is so sad how many young soldiers they did recruit. So many lives lost at such a young age.


message 16: by Ausjenny (new)

Ausjenny | 4927 comments thats sad about the young boys.

My great uncle died at Gallipoli. They arrived There and he died in the first couple of days.

It was good to see there names.

My dad, 5 uncles and 2 aunties were all in WW2. One uncle was captured by the Japs.


message 17: by Ausjenny (new)

Ausjenny | 4927 comments thats sad about the young boys.

My great uncle died at Gallipoli. They arrived There and he died in the first couple of days.

It was good to see there names.

My dad, 5 uncles and 2 aunties were all in WW2. One uncle was captured by the Japs.


message 18: by Janet (new)

Janet Dean | 466 comments Jennifer, those are precious mementos.

Isn't it amazing that an injury and retrieving something saved your grandfather and Janet's father's lives?

Jenny, I can't imagine how horrible prison camp must've been. Did your captured uncle survive the war?

Janet


message 19: by Ausjenny (new)

Ausjenny | 4927 comments Yes he survived the war. I think out of close on 750 only 160 survived. He was lucky to live as when they were captured he was so sick they though he was dead otherwise he would have been bayonetted to death.
From what mum said the only thing they couldn't eat was snails. It affected him for life.
One other uncle was in the z force which was a spy force.


message 20: by Debbie (new)

Debbie | 53 comments That would be awesome to see the Guttenberg Bible!

I did see the memorial out in North Platte, NE. There was a huge huge canteen set up out there for soldiers as they were passing through by rail on their way through during WWII.

(From Wikipedia) Lincoln County Historical Museum contains a display detailing the history of the North Platte World War II Canteen, which greeted 6.5 million service personnel from Christmas Day 1941 through April 1, 1946.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=07DGeL...

Make sure you watch the video - Have a couple of kleenexes handy!

My father in law was on the ship that went in and picked up survivors on Iwo Jima.


message 21: by Debbie (new)

Debbie | 53 comments Checked with my husband - he said his dad was on the ship that dropped the guys off on Iwo Jima and then went back to pick up the wounded.


message 22: by Lyn (new)

Lyn (lyncote) | 1644 comments Mod
Janet,
I wish I could see the Gutenberg Bible. It's said that without it, the Reformation would never have happened. Gutenberg made it possible for everyone to read the Bible for themselves.

And out of the Holocaust came the modern state of Israel. When I wrote my book Bette, I did a lot of research about Nazi Germany and its efforts to spy in the US in the 1930's. A fascinating topic for research. The Jews had been dispersed in the first century A.D but when the Nazi's began persecuting them, they had no homeland to go to. And other nations even the US wouldn't take many who were fleeing in the 1930's. That caused the desire for a homeland and is why Israel never allows an attack to go unresponded too.
Oops sorry to get so heavy today.
My dad and uncles all served in WWII and it cost them a lot for the rest of their lives. They made a great sacrifice for us.


message 23: by Jennifer (new)

Jennifer (jennafraugh) | 4102 comments Lyn wrote: "Janet,
I wish I could see the Gutenberg Bible. It's said that without it, the Reformation would never have happened. Gutenberg made it possible for everyone to read the Bible for themselves.

And o..."


I want to read that one! It's one of the few of yours I haven't read. :D


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