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message 51: by Alias Reader (last edited Mar 14, 2010 03:57PM) (new)

Alias Reader (AliasReader) Sarah: I've read enough tainted and revisionist history to know that "accuracy" is a moving target, even when people try hard to use reliable sources.
-----------------

I'm reading
1984 and in this novel history is what the party in charge says it is. As Orwell wrote, "whoever controls the past, controls the future."

Napoleon Bonaparte said: "what is history but a fable agreed upon."

And by anonymous, "One of the spoils of victory includes amnesia.


message 52: by Sarah (new)

Sarah (SarahReader) Yes, Joanne, I understand your objections to memoir quite clearly. I just don't share them.

This doesn't mean I condone dishonesty, and every book should be judged on its merits. I assume most memoir writers try to be honest, although they often are narcissistic and invested in portraying themselves as they want to be seen. The writer you heard obviously was far on the fiction (!) side of the continuum, and apparently admitted it. But plenty of people have strong, intact memories. Putting re-constructed quotes into fictionalized work or work based on memory is a well-understood literary device and usually just doesn't bother me.

As far as being voyeuristic, well, ouch . . . but, OK. I have plenty of faults. People who publish memoir obviously don't object to people knowing their version of their stories. The dysfunctional family/abused child stories give me the creeps and I avoid them, though Mary Karr and Jeanette Walls' first book were exceptions. I'm glad I've read many thoughtful memoirs and personal histories of interesting and often inspirational people.


message 53: by JoAnn/QuAppelle (new)

JoAnn/QuAppelle | 1608 comments Mod
Sarah wrote: "Putting re-constructed quotes into fictionalized work or work based on memory is a well-understood literary device and usually just doesn't bother me. .."

Of course I understand the use of made-up quotes in fiction...but in all my years of teaching English and as an editor, I never saw this use of quotes "condoned" as acceptable in non-fiction ---- unless the words were someone's exact words. Maybe I am just not up-to-date on literary devices!

I found this article interesting:

http://www.newyorker.com/arts/critics...


message 54: by Justin (new)

Justin Kramon | 9 comments I can understand why the use of quotes would be annoying. It's true that most nonfiction wouldn't be that open to such personal interpretation. But I think the same issue with quoting could be a problem in fiction or any writing that relies on memory. Even a fictionalized character might have trouble accurately remembering a conversation that happened when she was 3 or 4 years old. But fiction often directly quotes very old conversations.

I'm thinking that maybe each genre has its own expectations about accuracy. But I also think JoAnn has a good point that memoirs have become more popular over time for some reason. Proust could have made "Remembrances of Things Past" a memoir, and Henry Miller could have made "Tropic of Cancer" a memoir -- but both chose to make them novels for some reason related to the times they were writing in and their expectations of what books do.


message 55: by Suep (new)

Suep | 15 comments I like reading memoires because I enjoy and am facinated hearing/reading how others live, including their perseverance whether it is fact or not. The way I look at memoires is like this; it is the person's reality, not mine. I may question and suspect they are full of bull but it's their truth, not mine. Now, if they say everything written here is truth and factual, then I think that person lacks integrity and chalk it up to the almight dollar- make money on fabrications....A Million Little Pieces....Still, it's that person's conscious that they have to deal with knowing it's bull,and that everyone (most everyone) will question anything they write in the future. It's still entertaining.


message 56: by JoAnn/QuAppelle (new)

JoAnn/QuAppelle | 1608 comments Mod
Justin wrote: "But I think the same issue with quoting could be a problem in fiction or any writing that relies on memory. Even a fictionalized character might have trouble accurately remembering a conversation that happened when she was 3 or 4 years old. But fiction often directly quotes very old conversations."

But the difference is.....it is fiction! And it is supposed to be made up.

I would suspect that there is a term in the mental-health field for people whose reality is not real. LOL


Donna in Southern Maryland (Cedarville922) | 133 comments Mod
JoAnn/QuAppelle wrote: "Sarah wrote: "I think the memoir genre is a lovely hybrid, that allows people to reflect on their own or family history without the need to have sources, footnotes, etc. as in a more formal autobio..."

Thanks for your example JoAnn. I think I understand your point now. You are probably right. Why make it up if you don't have to?

Donna in Southern Maryland


message 58: by madrano (new)

madrano | 444 comments I agree, that seems dishonest. You think that is typical of the industry?

In your examples, JoAnn, i thought the first example was easier to read. Conversation just reads easier than text. This doesn't make it correct, only more lively, which is what i felt. The second conveyed the same idea but wasn't as pleasant to read. I suppose this is why authors have used quotation marks.

My thoughts on quotation marks changed when i noticed an author (& i wish i could recall who) use them when s/he was sharing what s/he thought. Something about that struck me as wrong, as it wasn't actually spoken. By the end of the book, i began looking at them differently & haven't looked back.

deborah


message 59: by JoAnn/QuAppelle (last edited Mar 15, 2010 04:43PM) (new)

JoAnn/QuAppelle | 1608 comments Mod
madrano wrote: "
My thoughts on quotation marks changed when i noticed an author (& i wish i could recall who) use them when s/he was sharing what s/he thought. Something about that struck me as wrong, as it wasn't actually spoken.."


I would prefer to see it written as:

I thought that the baby was cute.

as opposed to I thought "The baby is cute." That seems awkward.


message 60: by JoAnn/QuAppelle (new)

JoAnn/QuAppelle | 1608 comments Mod
madrano wrote: "In your examples, JoAnn, i thought the first example was easier to read. Conversation just reads easier than text. This doesn't make it correct,more lively, which is what i felt. ..."

But it is dishonest ---- because I have no idea of the exact words my mother used, just the general thought.


message 61: by JoAnn/QuAppelle (new)

JoAnn/QuAppelle | 1608 comments Mod
I don't know why I never thought to talk to my daughter about my unease regarding quotation marks in memoir. She is finishing up her masters in non-fiction writing at Johns Hopkins and has taken several memoir courses.

She said that none of her professors have ever allowed the use of quotation marks in non-fiction or memoir writing unless there is an exact quote. They have told the students that publishers and editors are often sloppy, resulting in what they (the professors) consider incorrect usage. Students were told to use narrative. She also said she never heard the use of made-up/reconstructed quotes referred to as a literary device, so maybe I do not need to get more up-to-date after all!


message 62: by madrano (new)

madrano | 444 comments I agree re. "The baby is cute." The inner thoughts were generally of this sort, a spineless person imagines confronting a bully, "What a loudmouth slob," I would declare. Or a person musing on events, "I think that's the worst holiday of the year!"

Again, i don't mind it but it rather jarred my understanding of the use of quotation marks, opening the door for a more expansive understanding. I can appreciate being taught, as your daughter is, the way works, particularly memoirs, should be composed, as far as punctuation goes. It's clear, sadly or not, that the new "definition" is going to continue, if for no other reason than that it sells.

deborah


message 63: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (AliasReader) Speaking of memoirs I just picked up from the library
Call Me Anna The Autobiography of Patty Duke by Patty Duke Call Me Anna: The Autobiography of Patty Duke by Patty Duke.

She was recently on NPR. It reminded me that I wanted to read her book.


message 64: by madrano (new)

madrano | 444 comments Alias, i hope you'll let us know what you think. I liked the book & felt she shared insight for loved ones. My brother read it too, in fact, he told me about it. He felt as though he much better understood our sister after reading it.

deborah


message 65: by JoAnn/QuAppelle (new)

JoAnn/QuAppelle | 1608 comments Mod
I just finished listening to Official Book Club Selection: A Memoir According to Kathy Griffin and enjoyed it so much. Griffin's show is one of my guilty pleasures, and even my husband watches it.

The book is probably a memoir, but since I listened to it I did not see any quotation marks so do not have to criticize that. Nor did she have any observations/remembrances of her early childhood!

This was a funny and often-poignant look at Griffin's life with all of its ups and downs. She talks about her late brother (whom she suspects was a pedophile), her betrayal by her husband and their divorce and her insecurities. You cannot help but be impressed by her work ethic, for which she credits her father.

Well worth reading. 5 stars.


Donna in Southern Maryland (Cedarville922) | 133 comments Mod
JoAnn/QuAppelle wrote: "I just finished listening to Official Book Club Selection: A Memoir According to Kathy Griffin and enjoyed it so much. Griffin's show is one of my guilty pleasures, and even my husba..."

I consider Kathy a guilty pleasure too. Sometimes she goes too far even for me, then I just turn her off. Probably be a fun thing to listen to the book as opposed to reading it. She is a more complicated person than she lets on, I'm sure. Her mom is a 'stitch.'

Donna


message 67: by Brittany (new)

Brittany (brittanylewis) | 2 comments I just finished reading "Mean Martin Manning" by Scott Stein and it was a hilarious look at what happens when organizations think they know best over individuals.


message 68: by JoAnn/QuAppelle (new)

JoAnn/QuAppelle | 1608 comments Mod
Brittany wrote: "I just finished reading "Mean Martin Manning" by Scott Stein and it was a hilarious look at what happens when organizations think they know best over individuals."

This sounds really entertaining, Brittany. How did you find it?

I liked this funny interview with the author:

http://www.encpress.com/MMMclip.html


message 69: by Leo (new)

Leo | 45 comments Paranoia by Joseph Finder About a week ago I finished Paranoia by Joseph Finder. Being someone who cannot stand suspense, I kept closing the pages. Maybe bcos I dont want anything bad to happen to its main character Adam Cassidy. Alas, I cheated where I skipped the said page and if nothing major happens to him; I reread the skip page. Coward!

Web of Deceit by Glenn Meade This was a fast read and a page turner for me. The only thing that prevent me from finished it within the same night was bcos I need to go to work early the next morning. Not bad for a book where I dont actually fancy any of its characters. The last two pages however was a letdown but I enjoyed the overall story.


message 70: by Lori (new)

Lori (seriousreader) | 11 comments I spent the past weekend in bed with a sinus infection. The only good thing about it--I didn't feel quilty about reading the whole time. I read The Book of Illumination by Mary Ann Winkowski and Maureen Foley. This book is a quick read along the lines of the TV Ghost Whisperer. I enjoyed the characters and ended up really liking the book.


message 71: by JoAnn/QuAppelle (new)

JoAnn/QuAppelle | 1608 comments Mod
A Friend of the Family
by Lauren Grodstein

2 GR stars

I read a lot of press about this book but it was a major disappointment to me. I failed to see the "great writing" about which I had read.

The anticipation was not worth the result and the writing was overly dramatic. The plot development was SO SLOW. I hated the foreshadowing and the jumping back and forth in time. Sometimes I would get a couple of sentences into a paragraph and then realize she had shifted time YET AGAIN. Annoying.

There was way too much detail, but about what?.....something the reader did not really know about, that was not revealed until the last few pages (the reason for Pete's banishment to the garage). So how are we supposed to care? By then I had lost interest. The author did not know when to stop building suspense and tell the darn story! I realized that Pete was in agonizing mental pain, loved his wife and son....but Grodstein kept beating the reader over the head with these facts. Too much manipulation by the author.

The book was full of characters I did not care about....and way too much writing about things that had nothing to do with the story and detracted from it.

The ending (from the time Pete went into NY to confront Laura to the end of the book) seemed tacked on. Her revelations made absolutely no sense and the story of Roseanne was not at all integrated into the novel --- the accusations seemed absurd given Pete's marginal interaction with her as a patient. The fallout from all of Pete's woes seemed false and forced. Not well done at all.

I usually do not stick with books to which I give two stars, but I wanted to see what all the fuss was about. My opinion: much ado about not much.


message 72: by R. (new)

R. Honey | 142 comments Gosh...this was on my list to get from the library!
I put down The Weissmans of Westport after maybe 25 pages. The people seemed shallow to me and the writing was stilted and hard to get into the flow ya know?
I guess its just like that sometimes for us readers. There was a HUGE 2 page ad for this book in the NYT book review..........


message 73: by JoAnn/QuAppelle (new)

JoAnn/QuAppelle | 1608 comments Mod
R. wrote: "Gosh...this was on my list to get from the library!
I put down The Weissmans of Westport after maybe 25 pages. The people seemed shallow to me and the writing was stilted and hard to get into the..."


I read the first few pages of this at the bookstore and had the same reaction as you did.

Lots of people liked the Grodstein book....


message 74: by R. (new)

R. Honey | 142 comments The Grodstein book got some attention here as I think she is from N.Jersey and teaches locally in Phila. area?


message 75: by JoAnn/QuAppelle (new)

JoAnn/QuAppelle | 1608 comments Mod
R. wrote: "The Grodstein book got some attention here as I think she is from N.Jersey and teaches locally in Phila. area?"

from her website:
Lauren teaches creative writing at Rutgers-Camden, where she helps administer the college's MFA program. She lives with her husband and son in New Jersey

This book is set in Jersey and one of the main characters taught at a community college


message 76: by R. (new)

R. Honey | 142 comments I may give A Friend of the Family 'a go" if I happen to see it at the library. Its not like I am at a loss for stuff to read with 3 stacks by my bet to start! Oh the sickness of it all!


message 77: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (AliasReader) R. wrote: post #72 "
I put down The Weissmans of Westport after maybe 25 pages. The people seemed shallow to me and the writing was stilted and hard to get into the the flow ya know?
I guess its just like that sometimes for us readers. There was a HUGE 2 page ad for this book in the NYT book review."

----------------------

I seldom read fiction, but that huge 2 page ad for the book in the NYT Book Review intrigued me and I put it on my TBR list. Sorry to hear you didn't like it.

[image error] The Three Weissmanns of Westport by Cathleen Schine Cathleen Schine


message 78: by R. (new)

R. Honey | 142 comments I remember liking the book of Schine's titled The Love Letter. I read it back in the early 2000's.


message 79: by Bunny (new)

Bunny | 254 comments I've put down three books in a row, all for the same reason - nasty characters and really nasty situations which, apparently, I'm simply not in the mood for right now.

Under the Dome - Stephen King - one rape too many.
The Lovely Water - Ruth Rendall - didn't like the characters from page 1.
The Silver Swan by Benjamin Black - good writing, yes - did I care? No.

So I've settled into Deaf Sentence by David Lodge which is keeping me giggling at situations that are all too real in my life - the deaf husband! He says that blindness is a tragedy, while deafness is a comedy and eyes are much more intriging than ears, i.e., he says one would never sing "Drink to me only with thine ears". Too true. Very, very good.


message 80: by JoAnn/QuAppelle (new)

JoAnn/QuAppelle | 1608 comments Mod
Bunny wrote: "I've put down three books in a row, all for the same reason - nasty characters and really nasty situations which, apparently, I'm simply not in the mood for right now.

The Silver Swan by Benjamin Black - good writing, yes - did I care? No.."


this last sentence made me laugh so hard. I feel that way when I cast aside a book that has gotten rave reviews but that I cannot stand!


message 81: by JoAnn/QuAppelle (new)

JoAnn/QuAppelle | 1608 comments Mod
I am very fond of Ron Rash's books. Nancy would ask me why, since his stories are pretty gritty and depressing......but the elegance of his writing belies the grittiness of his stories. I think one of the reasons I like his writing so much is because it is economical. He never uses words that are unnecessary and you all know how I feel about that!

I just read his newest book, Burning Bright: Stories and would highly recommend it. He obviously knows his subject matter well and is able to make us feel his characters' pain and the toughness of their lives. His stories all have a strong sense of place and show his years of Appalachian heritage. Imbued with a quiet beauty, each story paints a complete picture.

His beautiful and lyrical language just grabs the reader and does not let go. Here is something that just was so touching:

"He imagined towns where hungry men hung on boxcars looking for work that couldn't be found, shacks where families lived who didn't even have one swaybacked milk cow. He imagined cities where blood stained the sidewalks beneath buildings tall as ridges. He tried to imagine a place worse than where he was."

The stories in this book span the time from the Civil War through the present time and touch on a variety of subjects: poverty, family, job loss. Each story shows its characters' fortitude and endurance...and the grace with which they carry on every day.


message 82: by R. (new)

R. Honey | 142 comments I read the newest Dean Koontz book, Breathless last month. It was a good page turner but when I got to the end I was scratching my head asking what the bleep was that all about!
I also read The private Lives Of Pippa Lee. It was an impulse buy at B&N at Christmastime. This is now a movie that has has gone right to On Demand. I did watch the trailer yesterday. I plan on watching soon. Robin Penn Wright,Alan Arkin,Julianne Moore,Keanu Reeves& Kathy Bates star.
The book was a fast read. I did not like how it ended but thats just me!


message 83: by Leslie/cloudla (new)

Leslie/cloudla | 71 comments I love to read Ron Rash, too, JoAnn. I will have to get the latest one.

I just read a local author book for a book club, called Noah's Wife by Teresa K. Thorne. I didn't expect to like it but found myself not wanting to put it down. It is along the lines of The Red Tent, but I thought a better book. She came to our meeting and was delighful and very funny. She is a former police captain, and met her policeman DH in a bar the first time she drank (tequila sunrises). It made for a great story! The book is a fictitious story of Noah's wife, who had Asberger's, set in 5500 BCE. and I have to admit I don't know what the "E" in "BCE" stands for. I was impressed with the amount of research she did for this book.

Right now I have started the new Maisie Dobbs, and also the book about Major Pettigrew. I think I am going to like them both, and am having a hard time deciding which to delve into first. Also started the Postmistress in my Kindle. I am suffering from Spring fever and having a hard time settling down. The flowers here are beautiful!


message 84: by Bunny (new)

Bunny | 254 comments I've just finished The Man from Beijing by Henning Mankell, which was a pretty good book. Interesting but a little convoluted for my taste.
Now I've started The Final Solution by Michael Chabon - it's a breath of fresh air after all of the traditional writers I've been reading lately. And it has illustrations. I love that. A quote, "The living was a minor one, the blak vicar locally unpopular, the parishioners stingy as flints, and the Panicker family, in spite of Mrs. Panicker's thrift and stern providence, uncomfortable poor. It was only Mrs. Panicker's lavishly tended kitchen garden and culinary knack that could make possible the fine cold cucumber and chervil soup such as the one she now proposed, lifting the lid of the Spode tureen, to Mr. Shane, for whose sudden presence in the house, with two months paid in advance, she was clearly gratful."

We're off to Rome for a Mediterrean cruise on Saturday - the waiting's the hardest thing.


message 85: by JoAnn/QuAppelle (new)

JoAnn/QuAppelle | 1608 comments Mod
Bunny, have a wonderful trip. Where do you go besides Rome? What cruise line?

Bob's cousin is doing a cruise out of Rome in June on Oceana.


message 86: by JoAnn/QuAppelle (new)

JoAnn/QuAppelle | 1608 comments Mod
re: BCE

Several centuries after the AD/BC identification of historical dates became popular, a new movement developed among scientists, historians and some religious leaders. The time following the birth of Christ was now referred to as the "Vulgar Era" in some circles. The meaning of the word vulgar actually meant 'common' at that time, not distasteful or obscene.

Eventually many areas of the Western world adopted the less Christ-centered term "Common Era." Historical dates occurring before the year 1 CE would be considered BCE, short for "Before Common Era."

The relatively new BCE/CE reference for historical dates has had its share of supporters and critics. Critics view the new system as an attempt to remove the religious significance inherent in the BC/AD system. The BCE/CE method of assigning historical dates also fails to fix the BC/AD system's lack of a practical Year Zero. Modern scholars believe the actual birth of Christ would fall around 7 to 4 BC, which renders the actual year of 1 AD relatively meaningless historically.

Supporters of the BCE/CE method of identifying historical dates say the removal of Christian references works as a bridge between different religions and cultures. The BC/AD system appears to endorse Jesus Christ as the superior world religious figure, which could be viewed as disrespectful of other religions and belief structures. Although the birth of Christ is still used as a reference in the BCE/CE system, the Christian influence is not as apparent.

Some have argued that the religious significance of the BC/AD method has already been largely forgotten, so the need for change is not readily apparent. The use of BCE/CE is still quite limited, although some experts see it becoming the dominant means of identifying historical dates within a century or two.


message 87: by Leslie/cloudla (new)

Leslie/cloudla | 71 comments Thanks for enlightening me, JoAnn, The writer of this book is Jewish, so maybe she was trying to remove the setting from a Christ-centered dating. I wish I had had time to ask her this question.


message 88: by madrano (new)

madrano | 444 comments I first encountered BCE in the museums in Portland, OR. Here in NYC, the Met still has signs using "B.C."; i cannot recall what they used at the Smithsonian in DC but i have the sense that it was BCE. Don't quote me on that, though. No photos to back me up!

Raised Catholic, i still read "Before Christ" every time i see B.C. & "After Death" for AD, even though i know that isn't the Latin translation. It's the way the nuns made it "easy" for us--or so they told us.

deborah


Carolyn (in SC) C234D | 123 comments Leslie/cloudla wrote: "I love to read Ron Rash, too, JoAnn. I will have to get the latest one.

"Right now I have started the new Maisie Dobbs, and also the book about Major Pettigrew. I think I am going to like them both, and am having a hard time deciding which to delve into first. Also started the Postmistress in my Kindle."

Leslie, I'm also interested in all three books that you mentioned, although I don't have any of them yet. They all sound good!



message 90: by Shomeret (last edited Apr 14, 2010 09:07PM) (new)

Shomeret | 81 comments madrano wrote: "I first encountered BCE in the museums in Portland, OR. Here in NYC, the Met still has signs using "B.C."; i cannot recall what they used at the Smithsonian in DC but i have the sense that it was B..."

I encountered supermarket checkers having a discussion about BC and AD recently. They said it was "After Death". I, who was raised Jewish, proceeded to correct them. They thought I must be a school teacher. We were told in Yeshiva (Jewish religious school)that AD stands for Anno Domini which means Year of Our Lord, and that this is why Jews use CE instead. I think it's odd that nuns wouldn't teach the Latin words when I was taught the Latin and its meaning in Yeshiva.


message 91: by JoAnn/QuAppelle (new)

JoAnn/QuAppelle | 1608 comments Mod
I was always taught Anno Domini as the meaning of AD.

How long ago did Jews start using the CE designation, Shomernet?


message 92: by Alias Reader (last edited Apr 15, 2010 07:43AM) (new)

Alias Reader (AliasReader) I learned it as:
Before Christ
After Death

I'm not sure where I picked this up. I went to public school.


message 93: by madrano (new)

madrano | 444 comments Shomeret, you are correct. The nuns did use the Latin but then told us that "After Death" was valid, too, because it still implied factoring in Jesus. I figured i knew enough Latin (daily Mass!), so retained the After Death, rather than the Anno Domini. Typical kid. :-)

deborah


message 94: by JoAnn/QuAppelle (new)

JoAnn/QuAppelle | 1608 comments Mod
re-posting from Book Nook Cafe

I just read an ARC of Ann Hood's upcoming (in May) novel, The Red Thread, about Chinese adoptions (girls only). It was so interesting. Hood is being interviewed on NPR by Diane Rehm on May 5.

Hood herself adopted a baby girl from China 5 years ago, a few years after the tragic death from strep of her daughter Grace, which inspired Hood's wonderful book, Comfort: A Journey through Grief.

The Red Thread: A Novel

Comfort: A Journey Through Grief


message 95: by JoAnn/QuAppelle (new)

JoAnn/QuAppelle | 1608 comments Mod
Believe it or not, I just finished a MEMOIR that I "approve" of. LOL

What is not to love about this sweet book, written by an 82 year-old woman about her 1945 college summer as a page at Tiffany's? I loved all of the authentic references to the styles and events of that time.

Marjorie and Marty are college girls from Iowa, on an adventure in New York City and enjoying every minute despite the war. Hart details the enchantment of the city and the thrills the girls experience. From the way they landed jobs to their first glimpse of the ocean to the things that are omitted from the letters home, she gives the reader a special insight into the lives of these plucky young women.

Sixty years after that summer, Hart relives a special time in our nation's history and tells us what it was like. I kept thinking of how much my mother would have enjoyed this book.

Good job!


message 96: by Leslie/cloudla (new)

Leslie/cloudla | 71 comments What is the name of it, JoAnn?


message 97: by Alias Reader (last edited Apr 16, 2010 10:38AM) (new)

Alias Reader (AliasReader) If you click on JoAnn's avatar, you will get the list of books read.

Summer at Tiffany by Marjorie Hart


message 98: by JoAnn/QuAppelle (last edited Apr 16, 2010 11:35AM) (new)

JoAnn/QuAppelle | 1608 comments Mod
Leslie/cloudla wrote: "What is the name of it, JoAnn?"

oops, sorry. That is what I get for trying to post in a hurryt!

Alias is right-- Summer at Tiffany is the title.


Carolyn (in SC) C234D | 123 comments I never realized there was a Book Nook Cafe board here on Goodreads! Now I feel that I've been missing so much. No wonder there's not too much activity on this one. Now I must resist the temptation to try to read lots of old posts.


message 100: by JoAnn/QuAppelle (last edited Apr 16, 2010 02:17PM) (new)

JoAnn/QuAppelle | 1608 comments Mod
Carolyn (in SC) C234D wrote: "I never realized there was a Book Nook Cafe board here on Goodreads! Now I feel that I've been missing so much. No wonder there's not too much activity on this one."

Boo hoo, sorry you said that.

Book Nook Cafe has a lot more chatter than we do here.....many more threads. They also do group reads, which I have no interest in initiating on this board.

This board WOULD be busier if everyone would post a couple of times a week! HINT HINT


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