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Authors > Neil Gaiman

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message 1: by Tressa (new)

Tressa  (moanalisa) | 19935 comments Nice blog entry by Neil Gaiman about his first reading/book signing in Alabama.
http://journal.neilgaiman.com/2010/02...

He had always asked his publishers why they didn't schedule any tour dates in the south, and they'd tell him that people in the south don't really read and aren't interested in hearing an author read.

When tickets went on sale they sold out in 120 SECONDS. They thought the website had crashed.

Yes, Mr. Gaiman. Southerners not only like to read, but we like to write, too: Erskine Caldwell; Flannery O'Connor; Tennessee Williams; William Faulkner; James Dickey; Harper Lee; Margaret Mitchell; Alice Walker; Michael McDowell; Rick Bragg; Donna Tartt; Dorothy Allison; Pat Conroy; John Grisham; Robert McCammon; Eudora Welty; John Kennedy Toole; Thomas Wolfe; Anne Rives Siddons; Kay Gibbons; Zora Neale Hurston; Tim Gautreaux; Shelby Foote; Charlaine Harris; Richard Wright; Caitlin Kiernan; Poppy Z. Brite; Booker T. Washington; Walker Percy; James Lee Burke; Ernest Gaines; Katherine Anne Porter; Cormac McCarthy; Mary Monroe; Mark Childress; Carson McCullers; Truman Capote; William Bradford Huie.


message 2: by Rusty (new)

Rusty (rustyshackleford) | 134 comments He had always asked his publishers why they didn't schedule any tour dates in the south, and they'd tell him that people in the south don't really read and aren't interested in hearing an author read.

Aaaaahhhhh, how I hate people who think they know something about the South.


message 3: by Tressa (new)

Tressa  (moanalisa) | 19935 comments Why would anyone in their right mind think that people in the south don't read? People read or don't read all over the world. Must be that annoying bubble that the learned and O so wise "elite" live in.


message 4: by Rusty (new)

Rusty (rustyshackleford) | 134 comments At least Gaiman figured it out, despite his handlers. And I don't doubt he would be very entertaining in such a venue. I really enjoyed his narration of The Graveyard Book.


message 5: by Tressa (new)

Tressa  (moanalisa) | 19935 comments When my husband told me about the blog post I thought it was Naiman who was resistant to traveling south and rubbing elbows with us barefoot and sweaty southerners. Am glad to see that wasn't the case.

I never could get into the books of Gaiman's that I picked up, and even tried to listen to an audio with him as the reader, but was put off by his voice. But now I'm going to try again since he gave Alabama a shot.


message 6: by Scott (new)

Scott In related news, the only bookstore in Laredo, TX is closing:

http://www.dallasnews.com/sharedconte...


message 7: by Tressa (new)

Tressa  (moanalisa) | 19935 comments "Corporate America considers Laredo kind of the backwater," said the city's most prolific author, Jerry Thompson, a professor at Texas A&M University International who has written more than 20 books.

Yeah, that's what a lot of people consider the south.

I didn't even know there were B. Dalton bookstores around. They were in B'ham back in the '80s, but then disappeared when Books-a-Million and other big chains came to town.

My husband went on a work-related trip to visit the Tuscson, AZ, library system. I can't remember how many branches that system has. The residents there are wild about their libraries and flock to them in droves to attend the programs and leave with armfuls of books.

I think that's surprising for some to hear because of the large illegal immigrant population. People just assume they don't care about education or exposing their children to books. He said the libraries stayed packed with parents and their kids.

In our system the parents sometimes just drop off their kids and use the library as a babysitter. There's not a lot of involvement from families.


message 8: by Jaimie (new)

Jaimie (jez476) Tressa, have you tried American Gods? I have a feeling you may like this one. It's about what happened to the old-world gods when people stopped believing in them and their war with the new gods of the world.


message 9: by Tressa (new)

Tressa  (moanalisa) | 19935 comments Jaimie, that's one I picked up and started but couldn't get into it. Maybe I should ease myself into his books by starting with some of his teen fiction. Maybe The Graveyard Book? I hear good things about that one.


message 10: by Scott (new)


message 11: by Tressa (new)

Tressa  (moanalisa) | 19935 comments Nevermore is another one I tried to listen to. I couldn't get into this story either. What's wrong with me?


message 12: by LinBee (new)

LinBee I'm insulted that the publishers would think that. Grrr. I would believe Neil thinking that more because he is British, but the publishers...

I had trouble getting into "Neverwhere" at first, but I really enjoyed it. The first time I read it, I got through maybe the 1st chapter, but I listened to it recently and thoroughly enjoyed it. Neil seems to like to read his books, he has a nice voice. I like it because he as the author reads it how it was supposed to be read, not how someone interprets it. I'm listening to Stardust right now, and I loved Coraline too.


message 13: by Scott (new)

Scott Tressa wrote: "Nevermore is another one I tried to listen to. I couldn't get into this story either. What's wrong with me?"

Maybe if you read it.


message 14: by Tressa (new)

Tressa  (moanalisa) | 19935 comments You could be right, Scott. Sometimes that does make a difference.


message 15: by Garrett Cook (new)

Garrett Cook | 35 comments Feh. Just read his comics.


message 16: by Jaimie (new)

Jaimie (jez476) Neverwhere is a little odd. First he wrote it as a script for a BBC mini-series and then wrote it in book form. Neither are my favorites. The Graveyard Book is really cute. Coraline is great. Stardust really needs to be read in the graphic novel format. His Sandman series is great but I've tried some of his other comic series, Black Orchid & Books of Magic, and eh. I always recommend Good Omens or his short story books, Smoke and Mirrors: Short Fictions and Illusions & Fragile Things: Short Fictions and Wonders.


message 17: by LinBee (new)

LinBee Good Omens is my absolute favorite! I love both Mr. Gaiman & Terry Pratchett, and that book is hilarious!


message 18: by Scott (last edited Feb 25, 2010 02:07PM) (new)

Scott The main reason for reading Stardust was to see Charles Vess' illustrations, and I couldn't figure out why they published an edition without them.


message 19: by John (new)

John Everson (johneverson) | 117 comments Neil was the "artist in residence" in my town over the past week as part of the "Naperville Reads" program. He did all sorts of school readings and such. I saw him speak at the local high school on Tuesday.

I love AMERICAN GODS and ANANSI BOYS and STARDUST, but for my money, NEVERWHERE is still my favorite of his. I heard him do a live reading of it way back at the World Fantasy Con in 1997 (which was the first time I'd ever heard of him, not being a comics follower), and I bought an import version of the novel on the spot. I ADORE that book. CORALINE is a close second, and again, I heard him read that book -- in its entirety! He showed up to the 2000 World Horror Convention in Denver with the just finished manuscript in hand and announced that he'd do an impromptu reading that night. He ended up reading for more than three hours and did the entire short novel for us. Unbelievable!


message 20: by Tressa (new)

Tressa  (moanalisa) | 19935 comments Wow. He read the entire novel? He sure is dedicated to his fans. I like that.


message 21: by John (new)

John Everson (johneverson) | 117 comments What's really cool is that two years later, at World Horror Con in Chicago, he asked a huge audience, "Who heard me read Coraline in WHC in Denver?" and five of us raised our hands. He then pronounced "well, then, this is for the Denver 5!" and proceeded to read a chapter that he'd added to the book during subsequent edits :-)


message 22: by Scott (new)

Scott Neil has always been good to his fans. He's been known to stay extra late at signings just to make sure everybody gets to see him, even though they'd been scheduled to end hours earlier.


message 23: by LinBee (last edited Feb 26, 2010 02:22PM) (new)

LinBee He seems like a great guy. When I used to follow him on Twitter (when I Twittered or Tweeted, whatever), he was always going on about how wonderful his personal assistant is, what she does for him and all. He's not one of those uber celebs that abuse the staff. He also talks about his cats all the time.


message 24: by John (new)

John Everson (johneverson) | 117 comments "Fabulous Lorraine" (his assistant) is fabulous. I dealt with her when I was on the World Horror Con committee and we needed to get materials from him for the program book. And eight years later, she still works for him.


message 25: by Tom (new)

Tom Mueller | 69 comments John wrote: "Neil was the "artist in residence" in my town over the past week as part of the "Naperville Reads" program. He did all sorts of school readings and such. I saw him speak at the local high school on..."

Naperville, Illinois per chance?
I'm from Chicago; haven't lived there in many moons though.


message 26: by John (new)

John Everson (johneverson) | 117 comments Yep, Naperville, IL. Was pretty cool to have him here for a couple days doing things with all the schools, from grade school to college. Then I went to register my son for Kindergarten on Thursday and there was a big sig there in the LRC for Neil with CORALINE and GOLDFISH and others displayed about...


message 27: by Tom (new)

Tom Mueller | 69 comments Most excellent.
I just posted a pic of me, Neil and Amanda to my profile here. Pic was taken after an Amanda concert & Neil reading in Orlando a couple months ago.
They're both wonderful people, very appreciative of their fans. They spent a couple hours with us after the show. Got a signed copy of WKAP!
Anyone who wants to, please take a look at the pic.


message 28: by Tressa (new)

Tressa  (moanalisa) | 19935 comments Great pic, Tom. Thanks for sharing it.


message 29: by Anna (new)

Anna (stregamari) | 252 comments Tressa wrote: "Nice blog entry by Neil Gaiman about his first reading/book signing in Alabama.
http://journal.neilgaiman.com/2010/02...

He had always asked his publisher..."



Yes! I loved this post, especially that it started out with a quote from Groucho Marx.
Neverwhere is my favorite Gaiman book, all are incredible. My daughter has been collecting his graphic novels, they are beautifully drawn and written.


message 30: by Garrett Cook (new)

Garrett Cook | 35 comments John wrote: "Neil was the "artist in residence" in my town over the past week as part of the "Naperville Reads" program. He did all sorts of school readings and such. I saw him speak at the local high school on..."

Neil Gaiman was in Naperville last week?


message 31: by Anna (new)

Anna (stregamari) | 252 comments I've been following Neil's blog, it sounds as though he had a wonderful time.
http://journal.neilgaiman.com/2010/02...


message 32: by Tressa (new)

Tressa  (moanalisa) | 19935 comments Wait. He's five years older than me? He always appears so boyish. Maybe writing keeps him young? Must be my problem.


message 33: by Tressa (new)

Tressa  (moanalisa) | 19935 comments Handsome, sexy, smart, creative, and funny. Gaiman has it all.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6HD5yh...


message 34: by LinBee (new)

LinBee He does.


message 35: by Tressa (new)

Tressa  (moanalisa) | 19935 comments Uh HUH!


message 36: by Alannah (new)

Alannah I wish he would come to Canada!!


message 37: by Bob (new)

Bob (ilovepie) | 144 comments About the whole southern misconceptions that were at the beginning of the thread. I can under where you are coming from with that. I don't not live in the south, in fact I live in Pennsylvania. The part where I live is in the mountainous areas and we don't really have any large cities close by. So it is always a joy when someone from out of the area (mainly from a larger city) sees one of us mountain dwelling folks and ponders to why we are not eating a stew made out of possum roadkill or why we are not talking in complete redneck slang all the time. And god forbid the notion that we can read. So trust me I know all to well about how dimwitted misconceptions of certain peoples are.

However on a happier note. I have only read about two of Gaiman's novels (Coraline and The Graveyard Book), and absolutely loved them! I want to read American God's, Anansi Boy's, Stardust, Neverwhere, Good Omen's, Fragile Things, and his Sandman comics (among numerous other comics he has done).


message 38: by Tressa (new)

Tressa  (moanalisa) | 19935 comments I guess we all have preconceived notions about the places people live. I live in the south but am not a redneck, do not (think I) sound like a hick, I wear shoes in the summer, have gone to college, do not eat 'coon or pee in a wooden building with a moon cut out of the door.

I tried listening to The Graveyard Book and couldn't get into it. Tried American Gods and didn't care for it. I do love Coraline, though.


message 39: by Jason (new)

Jason (darkfiction) | 3233 comments I think it's time that people faced the fact that incest and illiteracy happens everywhere. Not just the backwoods. LOL


message 40: by Gatorman (new)

Gatorman | 8318 comments Jason wrote: "I think it's time that people faced the fact that incest and illiteracy happens everywhere. Not just the backwoods. LOL"

Well said! lol


message 41: by Bob (new)

Bob (ilovepie) | 144 comments Indeed, lol. I do hope everyone knows that I was not ranting, just agreeing with Tressa.


message 42: by Michelle (new)

Michelle Scott (michellescottfiction) | 7 comments ...people in the south don't really read and aren't interested in hearing an author read...

Seriously?? I live in Detroit, which is pretty north lol, and never for a moment would I have thought something like this. All those authors you mentioned, Tressa, are among my favorites. I'd also add Floridians Carl Hiaasen and Dave Barry to the mix.

If you are looking to get acquainted with Gaiman, I might recommend Coraline or Anansi Boys.


message 43: by [deleted user] (new)

Hmm its funny to see a thread dedicated to Gaiman here. I've never considered him a horror author.

Oh and as an outspoken borderline obnoxiously proud southerner, I'm quite impressed with the first post of this thread. Good for you, Tressa :)


message 44: by Jason (new)

Jason (darkfiction) | 3233 comments Gaiman has written some great horror short stories. But, I would agree. He's not really horror. Though I have noticed that a lot of horror readers have a healthy respect for Gaiman, probably because of his Sandman series.


message 45: by Michelle (new)

Michelle Scott (michellescottfiction) | 7 comments He's not really horror.

Wow, this really surprises me. Is that because he generally doesn't write about vampires and ghosts (except in The Graveyard Book)? I would consider him horror because he deals with the supernatural and is quite scary (imho at least).


message 46: by Scott (new)

Scott I would consider him a fantasist, but there is certainly horror in there.


message 47: by Jason (new)

Jason (darkfiction) | 3233 comments Oh yeah, there is definitely horror in his works, but I would say that he's a fantasist too.


message 48: by [deleted user] (new)

Agreed. Its never even remotely crossed my mind that he's horror. I've always considered him a fantasy author, tho rather fringe at best


message 49: by Scott (new)

Scott Well, stories like "Feeders and Eaters" or "Foreign Parts" are clearly horror.


message 50: by [deleted user] (new)

Hmmm I'm not familiar with those. I've read American Gods, Neverwhere, Stardust, Anansi Boys and some of his Sandman works.


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