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Fortune's Rocks

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Janie Anita Shreve captures the victorian age of forbidden passion of a much younger women and a married man. The story is of the refined and rich of the victorian age. The summers that are spent on lavish coastal regions makes the setting of this forbibben love unforgettable. The social criticism, and manners of highly ethical people of this period in time is so captivating. The way Shreve describes the charaters and setting is like you are right there part of the victorian age. Fortune's Rork will keep you and the edge of your seat



Ronni I agree!! I absolutely loved this book and couldn't put it down.


Salimah I hate the situation of which their "courtship" occured, but I LOVE reading about it. Shreve definetely put it all in perspective and related it to our day and age.


Normandy Anything by Anita Shreve is going to be moving and emotional. This was one of my favorites.


Peggy I love Anita Shreve's books, and especially the ones set in this same house. I was quite engrossed in this story, but the relationship between a teenage girl and her father's married friend was just too creepy to me. I know those things happened but it just was too disturbing to me, to the point I stopped reading the book about halfway through and never finished it.


Andrew Herren I have a 15 year old daughter so I agree the subject matter is scary. Great book though. I love her and wish there were more of her books to read. I thought Change of Altitude and Strange Fits of Passion were her best, but I loved them all.


Rachel Peggy wrote: "I love Anita Shreve's books, and especially the ones set in this same house. I was quite engrossed in this story, but the relationship between a teenage girl and her father's married friend was jus..."

I hadn't realised that she had written other books set in the same place. Can you tell me what they are please?


Melissa Sea Glass, The Pilot's Wife, and Body Surfing all take place in the same house as Fortune's Rocks :)


Peggy Yes and I loved all of them. I have to say Sea Glass is my favorite of the series, though.


Rachel Ah, I read Sea Glass a long time ago. I really enjoyed that one but didn't make the connection. I might re-read it. Thanks.


Joana Janie wrote: "Anita Shreve captures the victorian age of forbidden passion of a much younger women and a married man. The story is of the refined and rich of the victorian age. The summers that are spent on la..."

I could agree more with you! I've read alot of Shreve's books and this one is, by far, the best one..I've re-read it twice, I cannot put it down once I start it; their story is captivating and her characters are so deep and complex, I feel I know them by the time the book ends..

I really liked Body Surfing and Sea Glass.. I'm still not sure which one to order next.. Any suggestions? :)


Peggy If you haven't read "The Pilot's Wife" it is set in that house as well, but recently and it is an excellent read as well.


Joclyn I'm not 100% sure but I think "All He Ever Wanted" also takes place in the same house. I've read all of Anita's books and cant' wait until her next one comes out next year.


message 14: by Joanne (last edited Jun 19, 2012 03:52AM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Joanne This is one of my favourite books and I've read it at least 5 times (!) Don't you think it's interesting how Anita Shreve tackled this topic, though? I agree that the age difference makes the relationship between Olympia and Haskell seem weird, but you can't help rooting for them to be together. Great writing. What I find interesting is that this was a time of high moral standards, which makes the relationship even more forbidden - the first scene tells us this with Olympia being 'daring' by showing her ankles.
Go back a few hundred years and it was fairly usual for girls as young as twelve to be married off in nobility families. Age-appropriate relationships are a social construction, and Anita Shreve chose a great setting for her exploration.


Joana Joanne wrote: "This is one of my favourite books and I've read it at least 5 times (!) Don't you think it's interesting how Anita Shreve tackled this topic, though? I agree that the age difference makes the relat..."

I agree entirely, their age difference is meant to shock people and society, so that the plot itself becomes more meaningful..Once I was watching an interview of her and Anita said she felt a great interest in writing stories that focus on a single event (sometimes tragic/shocking) and then watch how that event changes people's lives and how it changes everything - how people deal with the consequences of their actions.

I've actually been meaning to ask a question here, that I read on her website, on this book: do you think that one can say Haskell fell in love with her when he saw her on the beach, or was the beginning of their relationship based on pure attraction/lust? I'd love to know some opinions! :)


Joanne Hi Joana,
I've noticed that Anita Shreve does that too, it's very interesting to me (as a writer) that she uses such an event as the springboard for a story.

I've always felt that Haskell fell in 'lust' with her on that day at the beach but must have been aware of how wrong it was to be attracted to such a young woman. And then, when they met again, he fell in love with her despite himself, out of admiration and regard. One of the things I think is so powerful is how their relationship grows in such tiny and subtle ways - almost telepathically.


Lorrie My 1st Shreve book was "Sea Glass" which I didn't love but it was good. I LOVED this book. I also found interesting the reference to child labor in the mills. How working children at age 8 in the mills was normal & necessary for the not so fortunate classes. As for the house being the same.....I don't remember the chapel in "Sea Glass". Was it referred to?


Diane I really loved this book!!, So good.


Sophia Efthymiades Lorrie wrote: "My 1st Shreve book was "Sea Glass" which I didn't love but it was good. I LOVED this book. I also found interesting the reference to child labor in the mills. How working children at age 8 in the m..."

I do not recall the chapel in Sea Glass, either. I've also been wondering how long the house for unwed mothers remained occupied/in-service, since Sexton and Honora (Sea Glass) had a ton of work to do to make the home habitable. What ever happened to Olympia and Haskell and their service to young mothers?


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