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Food / Drink > Spices...> Coriander: smells like socks, or tastes like yum?

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message 1: by RandomAnthony (new)

RandomAnthony | 14536 comments Ok, I think we've talked around this but not in specific.

What are your favorite spices? Which are your least favorite spices? What's your opinion on the little jars of spices you get in supermarkets, or what Anthony Bourdain calls "sawdust"?

I love garlic. Does garlic count as a spice? My wife hates it, though. And I grow basil most years, and fresh basil is a gift from God. And I grow/love sage, too, but I tend to burn it more often than put it in food. Sally, weren't you married in a sage field?

Spice thoughts/recommendations?


message 2: by Christopher (last edited Feb 17, 2010 05:05AM) (new)

Christopher Allen (dcallen) | 32 comments Tarragon in scrambled eggs or a tomato sauce adds a bang of flavor. Don't add too much. Just a few dried bits will do.

Garam masala (a mix of cumin, cloves, cardamom and pepper) for meat stews lends a rich flavor that's distinctly Indian; but without the other Indian spices, it doesn't overpower the dish.

The smell of rosemary makes me sick.

RandomAnthony, have you tried caramelizing the sage with shallots?




message 3: by RandomAnthony (new)

RandomAnthony | 14536 comments RandomAnthony, have you tried caramelizing the sage with shallots?

Clearly, Christopher, you overestimate my cooking acumen:) What does "carmelizing" mean?


message 4: by Sarah (new)

Sarah | 13815 comments RandomAnthony wrote: "RandomAnthony, have you tried caramelizing the sage with shallots?

Clearly, Christopher, you overestimate my cooking acumen:) What does "carmelizing" mean?"

Cook 'em slowly in butter or olive oil so they brown and sweeten.

I like to roast sage with butternut squash.

We have a giant rosemary bush and a couple of other herbs growing, but mostly have to rely on the farmer's market and the dried stuff.

For dried herbs I like cumin. And chipotle powder. Not necessarily in the same dish.







message 5: by Kevin (new)

Kevin  (ksprink) | 11469 comments posh, sporty and ginger. not so much scary or baby


message 6: by RandomAnthony (last edited Feb 17, 2010 05:30AM) (new)

RandomAnthony | 14536 comments Thanks, Pi!

Shit. I was going to cut off the spice girls talk in the original post, but I forgot.

I always liked Posh, too, I must admit.


message 7: by Kevin (new)

Kevin  (ksprink) | 11469 comments ha! it's done for now.

my real answer is: spicy. dried hot peppers mostly. i grow my own mostly but i have supplemented recently with Bhut Jolokia


message 8: by [deleted user] (new)

Cinnamon

Then basil & sage



message 9: by Christopher (new)

Christopher Allen (dcallen) | 32 comments Yep, anything that sets my soul afire is wonderful.

When you're caramelizing the shallots and sage, finish it with just a bit of honey and balsamic vinegar. You can also do this with leeks and Baby Spice.


message 10: by Gus (new)

Gus Sanchez (gussanchez) I like the spice Melange, which allows me to fold space, and it gives my eyeballs a nice blue tint...because he who controls the spice controls the universe...


message 11: by Kevin (new)

Kevin  (ksprink) | 11469 comments my sis swears by jungle jims


message 12: by Misha (new)

Misha (ninthwanderer) Gus' comment = love. ♥

I love cooking with curry, but it's hard to find the right blend. "Sawdust" is an apt description for the grocery store stuff. Blech.


message 13: by Christopher (new)

Christopher Allen (dcallen) | 32 comments I once bought what I thought was curry in Tunisia. It turned out to be mostly sand. Sucker, me.


Jackie "the Librarian" | 8993 comments I love basil, I like to sprinkle it on my grilled cheese and tomato sandwiches. I have rosemary growing outside in the garden, which is great with roasted potatoes. I love how thyme smells like pizza all by itself.

Hmm, I guess I like Italian spices. :)

I love the smell of cloves, too, which is the smell of Christmas to me.

I love garlic and onions, and I love roasted garlic cloves to spread on bread - but only if I don't have to be around people who haven't eaten a lot of garlic, too. :)

I like the smell of sage, but not so much the flavor. I'm a little allergic to sage brush, and used to get a runny nose in the fall when it bloomed, the years I lived out in the northern California desert. But as I don't live around it anymore, it's not really a problem.


message 15: by Christopher (new)

Christopher Allen (dcallen) | 32 comments @Jackie. I bet you'd love tarragon as well.


message 16: by smetchie (new)

smetchie | 4034 comments I do! I love tarragon. I like it in my scrambled eggs, just like you said. Also in melted butter with lemon for dipping steamed artichoke leaves.

I like Cilantro in scrambled eggs and most other places too.

I like ground fennel seed in my tomato sauce.


message 17: by Sarah (new)

Sarah | 13815 comments Two handy uses for dill:
1)We made dill cottage cheese bread the other day, and it was out of this world. It didn't need anything on it.

2)Toss pasta with lemon juice, chickpeas, steamed broccoli, sugar, and dill. You have to kind of balance the sugar and dill to taste, but it's a cool combination. Parmesan can also be added, but it can overpower the other flavors, so be careful.

One handy use for chipotle chili powder:
Carmelize some onions
Add black beans
Add lots of chili powder and chipotle powder, and a little bit of cinnamon.
Add maple syrup
Add some spinach if you wanna
Add some cheddar if you wanna
You want to balance the sweet & the heat
It tastes good hot or cold, in a tortilla or over rice


message 18: by Kevin (new)

Kevin  (ksprink) | 11469 comments cilantro is weird, plus i had a friend who flipped out in a tex-mex restaurant because they didn't have fresh cilantro and now i can't even think about it. it was embarrassing.


message 19: by Christopher (last edited Feb 17, 2010 01:24PM) (new)

Christopher Allen (dcallen) | 32 comments That IS embarrassing. I always carry some in my shoes just in case. My partner says cilantro smells like socks.

Gretchen, you and I are herbpatable.


message 20: by Sarah (new)

Sarah | 13815 comments Herbpatable! I love it!


message 21: by Kevin (new)

Kevin  (ksprink) | 11469 comments you guys would have a herbtastic time dining together


message 22: by smetchie (new)

smetchie | 4034 comments Sarah Pi wrote: "Herbpatable! I love it!"

Me too! That's the best thing I've ever herbed.


message 23: by RandomAnthony (new)

RandomAnthony | 14536 comments Which is the one that starts out as one spice then turns into another? Isn't cilantro involved?


message 24: by Christopher (last edited Feb 17, 2010 06:07PM) (new)

Christopher Allen (dcallen) | 32 comments Hmmm. In North America, we call the leaves cilantro and the seeds coriander. In Europe, both the leaves and the seeds are called coriander.


message 25: by Misha (new)

Misha (ninthwanderer) Cilantro is also known as coriander, but I think it's still the same spice regardless of which name is used.


message 26: by smetchie (new)

smetchie | 4034 comments Wow, I never knew that!

Wikipedia says: The leaves have a different taste from the seeds, with citrus overtones. Some perceive an unpleasant "soapy" taste or a rank smell and avoid the leaves. Belief that this is genetically determined may arise from the known genetic variation in taste perception of the synthetic chemical phenylthiocarbamide

interesting.


message 27: by Christopher (new)

Christopher Allen (dcallen) | 32 comments Why couldn't they just come clean and say cilantro tastes like stinky socks to some people? phenylthiocarbamide = stinky socks.

But I like it.


message 28: by Sally, la reina (new)

Sally (mrsnolte) | 17319 comments Mod
See, I don't think it tastes at all like stinky socks, but rather like fresh yum.


message 29: by Christopher (new)

Christopher Allen (dcallen) | 32 comments I'm with ya, Sally. I think yum.

BunWat, please expound. Like a mutt?


message 30: by [deleted user] (new)

BunWat wrote: "That's because you are genetically variable. "

I like the expression, I may use that today.



message 31: by Félix (new)

Félix (habitseven) I kinda think we're ALL genetically variable. It's what makes us strong. It's one of the advantages of sexual reproduction, after all.

I'm a gloriously blended mess o' genes from way back there. And quite proud of it.


message 32: by Kevin (new)

Kevin  (ksprink) | 11469 comments so i'm a mutt?


message 33: by Félix (new)

Félix (habitseven) You are.


message 34: by RandomAnthony (new)

RandomAnthony | 14536 comments It's one of the advantages of sexual reproduction, after all.

I am disappointed that this softball went unnoticed for close to 18 hours.


message 35: by Kevin (new)

Kevin  (ksprink) | 11469 comments ha! yeah. one of the main advantages of sexual reproduction is mixed genes. for me it is mixing jeans up on the floor after a night of trapeze stunts, cowboy chaps and I Can't Believe It's Not Butter


message 36: by RandomAnthony (new)

RandomAnthony | 14536 comments Thank you.

hugs Kevin


message 37: by Christopher (last edited Feb 19, 2010 05:33AM) (new)

Christopher Allen (dcallen) | 32 comments Peanut Butter, Kevin. I can't believe it's not Peanut butter.


message 38: by Félix (new)

Félix (habitseven) Sometimes my jeans genes like cilantro. But sometimes they don't.


message 39: by Christopher (new)

Christopher Allen (dcallen) | 32 comments Sometimes I feel like a nut; sometimes I . . . OK, I always feel like a nut. A peanut.


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