Islam discussion

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I have a few questions

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message 1: by John (new)

John Dreamer | 6 comments First of all my name is John and I just want to say that I am no here to argue with you about your beliefs. That said, I am very curious about why you believe in Islam? What lead to your belief? What convinced that Islam is true? Thank you for any answers


message 2: by Femmy (last edited May 10, 2010 07:02AM) (new)

Femmy | 120 comments Hi John, I was born in a Muslim family and live in a country where the majority of the population are Muslim (Indonesia), so I guess that's what first led me to Islam.

When I went to the US as an exchange student, I lived with a devout Baptist family for almost a year. I went to church with them three times a week. During that time, I didn't question my faith per se, but I did ask to myself about the people in my church, How can people this good be wrong? So I did some reading about Islam and Christianity. I don't think my reading was deep or anything, I was only a high school student at the time, but in the end I (re)chose Islam as my belief.

Some points about the two religions that I considered were:

* I just can't bring myself to believe in the Trinity. The absolute Oneness of God taught in Islam makes more sense to me. That a "god" can die on the cross also didn't sit well with me.

* I didn't like the concept of original sin. I can't wrap my brain around the assertion that babies are born sinful. The Islamic concept of fitrah, in which babies are born pure, makes more sense to me.

* It seems to me that Christianity was "created" by Paul, instead of Jesus. And it seems strange to me that a new religion is "suddenly" established, and people before and after Christianity have different rules to achieve salvation. On the other hand, Islam teaches that Islam has been around since Adam, and Prophet Muhammad's teachings is a continuation of prior prophets and messengers, so while there is variation in religious practices over time, the essential teachings are the same and people have essentially the same rules for salvation.

I hope that answers your question. I'm sure other Muslims here have different reasons for believing in Islam.


message 3: by Aliya (last edited May 09, 2010 09:43PM) (new)

Aliya (ayilamina222) | 43 comments i chose to believe in islam becasue i dont understand how since God is one, can have a son.......and christians sort of like worship Jesus.......in islam we respect jesus and other people.......but we worship are one God......i was born into islam caz my parents were both islam.....


message 4: by Not Bill (new)

Not Bill | 32 comments Aliya, please. That's insulting, to both believers and non believers. Try again for your own benefit.

Femmy, sorry but you're definitely wrong. Islam did not exhist going back to Adam. Islam had a very definite beginning and we're all very clear on what that was. Christianity is murky. There were competing messages to be sure. Paul had the ear of Rome, and the results speak for themselves. Even then, Islam has Shia and Sunni. Nothing is ever quite so clean and neat, is it?


LungHuo* 龍火 * | 31 comments Islam like told in the quran and sunnah is quite the same as original christianity. I don't mean the Paulus-founded christian belief but the belief before Paulus. The rejected gospels like Jacobus etc., Kumran scrolls etc. That means everything before the concil of Nicäa.
Also the Torah, except some changes which the jews themselfs say they were changed by priests, is quite the same.
Islam wasn't founded by the prophet and messenger Muhammad(saw)(why do u think it isn't called Muhammadanism or so?). He, like other prophets before him, renewed and strengthned the belief in one God, by order of God.


message 6: by Femmy (last edited May 10, 2010 07:01AM) (new)

Femmy | 120 comments Not Bill, Islam does go back to Adam. That's what Islam teaches and that's what we believe. Of course, you're welcome to believe that Islam was founded by Prophet Muhammad, and to say that we're wrong, but that doesn't make your opinion the correct one, nor does it change the fact that Islam teaches this concept.


message 7: by Aliya (new)

Aliya (ayilamina222) | 43 comments Not Bill wrote: "Aliya, please. That's insulting, to both believers and non believers. Try again for your own benefit.

Femmy, sorry but you're definitely wrong. Islam did not exhist going back to Adam. Islam ha..."


John, Islam teaches us that Jesus isnt God's son........your post asked "what led to your belief?" and now Femmy, others, and me are answering it....you also said that you werent goign to argue but u kind of are.........I AM NOT trying to put down your religion.......i have many close Christians friends and they accept me and I accept them............another belief in Islam is to be tolerant to other religons


message 8: by MissJessie (new)

MissJessie Aliya==Not Bill is just trying to convert you or upset you --just ignore him.


message 9: by Aliya (new)

Aliya (ayilamina222) | 43 comments well i cant really ignore him caz what he said is actually kinda hurtful......to believers at least......when he posts his questions i though he actually wanted to LEARN about the muslim faith.....not put muslims down or convert them


message 10: by Femmy (last edited May 11, 2010 08:19PM) (new)

Femmy | 120 comments Aliya, Not Bill and John (the original poster) are two different people. Not Bill usually writes things that are provocative. John hasn't posted here much, so I don't know him well.


message 11: by Aliya (new)

Aliya (ayilamina222) | 43 comments Yallah! i misread the original message yesterday.....i thought it said that notbill's real name was john......i feel so bad now caz i was being mean to John when he wasnt even saying anything........


message 12: by Not Bill (new)

Not Bill | 32 comments LOL...trying to convert? Please. Demonstrate in any of my posts where that is the case. You can't, but please do try, that'll be comedy gold.

Christians can trace their roots to the Old Testament. Is that Christianity?

So, it is taught the the Koran is the literal word of Allah given breath by the one Prophet. So tell me then how pre Mohammaden history enters into Islam? Or in fact, are we discussing nothing more than tribal squabbles?


message 13: by Femmy (last edited May 19, 2010 04:27AM) (new)

Femmy | 120 comments Christians, by definition, are followers of Christ. Christianity is the religion founded on his teachings. So, of course, people who lived before Christ cannot be called Christian, and Christianity doesn't exist before there was Christ. Regardless that they can trace their roots to the Old Testament or not.

On the other hand, Islam is the religion founded on submission to God. It is the religion ordained by God for all humanity for all time. All God's prophets are Muslims who conveyed the message of Islam and taught their people to submit to God. Moses's Torah, David's Zabur, Jesus's Injil, and Muhammad's Quran are all Islamic texts that teaches their people to submit to God (though only the Quran is preserved). So, since the beginning of humanity, since Adam, people are taught to submit to God and are Muslims. It is only later that people deviate from the path of Islam and create their own religions.

Similarly, Islam teaches that all people are Muslims from the moment they are born, that they have an innate disposition to submit to God. It is the teachings of their parents that make them Christians or Hindus or others. That's why some people say that people who enter Islam are reverts, instead of converts, because they are considered returning to Islam, returning to their true selves, returning to their fitrah.

This is what we believe.

So I think that Islam is not something outside of ourselves, outside of humanity, something foreign that we must take into our hearts. (It's not like Christianity, where humanity must wait for Jesus to come to be saved, where each person is born with original sin and must accept Jesus to become saved.) Instead, Islam is something that is part of us, part of humanity, something that is within us from the beginning.

I'm not really sure what you mean by "tribal squabbles" and how that relates to this topic.


message 14: by Wendy (last edited May 12, 2010 03:45AM) (new)

Wendy (wendywins) | 78 comments "Islam teaches that all people are Muslims from the moment they are born, that they have an innate disposition to submit to God. It is the teachings of their parents that make them Christians or Hindus or others."Femmy said.

It is always the teachings of ones's parents/elders and of course,particularly obvious in a land where one religion dominates. One is raised Muslim in Muslim homes, Christian in Christian homes, Jewish in Jewish homes,Hindu in Hindu homes, Buddhist in Buddhist homes,etc and the sect of whatever religion is similarly determined.
It is the belief that deviation from "the true religion" is falling away from God that is common (though obviously the "true religion" is defined differently)in theist religions. It is an intrinsic part of the particular religious belief that that belief is the right one!
If, all are born Muslim even before Mohammed, then assumably, one would not have to believe in Mohammed as a prophet but still submit to the will of Allah? Would one have to believe Mohammed went to Heaven on a White Horse?


message 15: by Femmy (last edited May 12, 2010 05:49AM) (new)

Femmy | 120 comments Wendy wrote: "If, all are born Muslim even before Mohammed, then assumably, one would not have to believe in Mohammed as a prophet but still submit to the will of Allah? Would one have to believe Mohammed went to Heaven on a White Horse?"

Well, to submit to the will of Allah, we would have to know what that will is, wouldn't we? Allah lets His will be known through His prophets and messengers. So we have to look to them, and the message they convey. Islam teaches that Allah did send many messengers to many peoples, much more than the twenty-five mentioned by name in the Qur'an.

So which messenger should we obey? Well, almost all of these messengers are sent only to their own people. (I think in the Bible, Jesus once mentioned that he was only sent to Jewish people, not to other peoples. Anybody knows the verse?) Prophet Muhammad was the last prophet and the only one sent to all humanity, and the Qur'an is the only divine book that is preserved by God. So for people of today, to submit to the will of God, we have to look to the Prophet Muhammad and the Qur'an. This is what we believe.


message 16: by Δx Δp ≥ ½ ħ (last edited May 12, 2010 05:16AM) (new)

 Δx Δp ≥ ½ ħ  (tivarepusoinegnimunamuhsunegiuq) | 4 comments Femmy wrote: "(I think in the Bible, Jesus once mentioned that he was only sent to Jewish people, not to other peoples. Anybody knows the verse?)"

Did you mean this?

Matthew, 15 :24 : "Then Jesus said to the woman, "I was sent only to help God's lost sheep--the people of Israel." (New Living Translation Edition, 2007)

Matthew, 10:5 : "Jesus sent out the twelve apostles with these instructions: "Don't go to the Gentiles or the Samaritans," (New Living Translation Edition, 2007)

check this out : http://bible.cc/matthew/10-5.htm


message 17: by Femmy (new)

Femmy | 120 comments Yes, I believe so. Thank you.


message 18: by Wendy (new)

Wendy (wendywins) | 78 comments If Mohammed was sent as a prophet to all people, it might have been helpful if the Quran was sent in another language other than Arabic.


LungHuo* 龍火 * | 31 comments why? You can learn arabic, can't you? You can ask someone who knows arabic, can't you? Or you can read the translation?


message 20: by Wendy (last edited May 13, 2010 10:22AM) (new)

Wendy (wendywins) | 78 comments Well, to communicate with more people, the Qu'ran could have been dictated in Chinese, for example.
As for translation, I thought that translation was a way to introduce corruption of the Word. Translations used to be forbidden.
That is why Muslims in some areas...are supposed to memorize it in Arabic rather than in their own language...even if they have not learned Arabic well enough to speak it.

In the time of Mohammed, I would imagine even fewer people in the world could read Arabic and that included many who spoke it.
There has been less opposition to translation of Holy texts in other traditions...though of course, early on, the Catholic church opposed translating the Bible into English etc though it had been TRANSLATED INTO Latin by Erasmus etc...
Do you, LungHuo, read Arabic?


message 21: by LungHuo* 龍火 * (last edited May 13, 2010 10:59AM) (new)

LungHuo* 龍火 * | 31 comments assalamualaikum warahmatullahi wabarakatuhu,

the translation, as well as the arabic text have to be studied to understand them. I also didn`t mean: to use only the translation but to use it as a help if you don't understand arabic. Of course as a muslim you'll have to learn arabic sometime to completely understand the Quran. And also then you have to use the Tafsir(Quran explanation) of the scholars.

Why should it have been sent down in chinese to arabic speaking people? Oo....

Ofcourse as a muslim you have to memorize the Quran in arabic because only the arabic language catches the full meaning.

I don't think learning a new language would hurt. It's even better to learn as many languages as you can.

Yep I can read arabic. I use a translation plus tafsir also for better understanding.


message 22: by Wendy (last edited May 13, 2010 12:47PM) (new)

Wendy (wendywins) | 78 comments I read English, Latin, Spanish, Chinese (Mandarin), some French, some Swahili, some Dutch and some Russian(which was, it turned out, one language more than I wanted at the time!). I have also taken linguistics in graduate school...along with my review of third year Chinese...This was years ago...

If I wanted to communicate a message to the people of the world, I would choose a language widely read and understood.

That was my point...and reading a text in a language foreign to your own does not guarantee you understand the nuances or sometimes even the basic meaning meant by the writer EVEN if it were written by someone in contemporary times and in the context of common concepts and assumptions in the time and place in which it was written.


message 23: by Femmy (last edited May 13, 2010 05:27PM) (new)

Femmy | 120 comments Wendy, I don't think we can look at a situation at a particular point of time to determine which language is used the most. The lingua franca of today is English, but that doesn't necessarily mean it was so in the past, or it will be so in the future. The same goes for Mandarin or any other language. Who knows, maybe someday Arabic will be the world's lingua franca.

I think there are arguments about why God chose to reveal the Qur'an in Arabic. I haven't read them all myself, but if you're interested, you can look it up.

Arabic is a language that is built around root words, so it is less likely to evolve as other languages, and therefore retains its original meaning. On the other hand, in other languages, one word could mean one thing in the past, and means another today because of the evolution of meaning. (How the root word is conjugated is very different from English and French, by the way.) I once read this as one of the arguments.


message 24: by Femmy (last edited May 14, 2010 01:36AM) (new)

Femmy | 120 comments Wendy wrote: "Translations used to be forbidden.
That is why Muslims in some areas...are supposed to memorize it in Arabic rather than in their own language"


"I thought that translation was a way to introduce corruption of the Word. -snip- ...reading a text in a language foreign to your own does not guarantee you understand the nuances or sometimes even the basic meaning meant by the writer..."

Wendy, what you said above is right. As a translator by trade, I know how meanings can get lost in translation. So I think it is important for Muslims to learn and memorize the Qur'an in its original language.

Although the Qur'an has now been translated into other languages, we still memorize the Qur'an in Arabic. (There are many people in the world who memorize the whole Qur'an, called hafiz.) We still pray in Arabic.

We realize that there is no English Qur'an, no Indonesian Qur'an, no Mandarin Qur'an. There is only one Qur'an, the Arabic Qur'an, and the rest are just translations. So people who don't speak Arabic and want to understand the Qur'an should read the translation with the tafsir (exegesis).

I do read Arabic, by the way. Many Muslims learn to read Arabic from when they were little (at least in Indonesia). I'm also currently learning the Arabic language.


message 25: by Wendy (new)

Wendy (wendywins) | 78 comments That is very interesting, Femmy! How interesting too, it is to be a translator! I have studied a variety of languages some deeply and some just enough to "get by" in a country (I did that to Serbo-Croation). Some languages are so related that one can "pick up" enough from knowing Latin and Spanish..for example to get the gist of what people are saying...in Italian. I find Pashto very difficult but that may be because of trying to learn it on my own. I have friends who know Farsi which is, I guess, close to Dari and find that pretty useful.....
However, in Afghanistan, for example, a Muslim country, so many Muslims cannot read Arabic and all they can do is memorize. Someone else, a mullah, must tell them what they have memorized means and of course that means to some extent translating the meaning if not the exact words into Pashto or Dari.


message 26: by Wendy (last edited May 13, 2010 07:16PM) (new)

Wendy (wendywins) | 78 comments I think that if Christians actually read the New Testament writings in the original, they would not make the mistakes in interpetation that they do now. Now, most seem to go by what their ministers TELL them...even if they read their translated Bible. For example, the Greek word for unmarried woman is the word used to describe Mary, mother of Jesus which is NOT the same as "virgin".

Another issue, besides translation problems is the problem of the choice of manuscript in the original language to translate FROM. It may not be the oldest manuscript and may, as in the case of Christian New Testament manuscripts reflect changes and additions or errors by scribes who copied them from older manuscripts. If a translation is made from a manuscript and later an OLDER manuscript is found that differs, the translation has created a whole generation of Bibles with undifferentiated text that is not the original version certainly.
For example, scholars now have identified whole verses of the New Testament that were added (and were not in the earliest manuscripts found) and the King James version of the New Testament, based on the translation of a later manuscript, included those added verses...
So...its not only translations that carry mistakes and changes, but even the copying and recopying over time...much like the telling and retelling of stories and passing them on, inevitable include changes, errors, additions and subtractions!


message 27: by Not Bill (new)

Not Bill | 32 comments Femmy's post #13 simply demonstrates his/her inability to engage in logic. It's a useless, empty gesture to engage someone so marinated in religious ideology, which of course is a feature and not a bug of all fundamentalist movements.


message 28: by Femmy (last edited May 16, 2010 07:43PM) (new)

Femmy | 120 comments Which part is illogical to you? I would welcome a discussion. I enjoy answering Wendy's questions, for example. Please ask questions or offer an argument. It seems that you often only say what you believe, or put down what Muslims here have to say. It's rather difficult to have a discussion if you don't offer arguments, unless having a discussion is not your goal.

By the way, I'm a woman, as my picture shows.


message 29: by Aliya (new)

Aliya (ayilamina222) | 43 comments Not Bill, i dont want 2 be rude but.....why did u join this "islam group" if you care nothing about muslims/their religion and only want to put muslims down..........


message 30: by Niamunira (new)

Niamunira | 1 comments yeah.........that is totally right.Why do u bother talking Muslims if u put muslims down.


message 31: by MissJessie (new)

MissJessie Some people are more interested in stirring people up than in learning.

I am Christian and always will be but am trying to understand the Muslim point of view and learn that not all Muslims are violent terrorists, which is what seems to be the common point of view of a lot of people.


message 32: by Aliya (new)

Aliya (ayilamina222) | 43 comments thank you niamunira and missjessie...............u are the ones who make the "islam group" good...........


message 33: by [deleted user] (new)

MissJessie wrote: "Some people are more interested in stirring people up than in learning.

I am Christian and always will be but am trying to understand the Muslim point of view and learn that not all Muslims are vi..."


Thank u for that.:)I'm glad that not everyone thinks were bombers or terriosts.


message 34: by Aliya (new)

Aliya (ayilamina222) | 43 comments Wendy wrote: "If Mohammed was sent as a prophet to all people, it might have been helpful if the Quran was sent in another language other than Arabic."

i know this is kinda late to reply to this old post but i recently finished this arabic summer class....and i learned that arabic was the common language of the people back then, so the Quran was revealed in that language......however when new languages started to develop, more and more people stopped learning arabic


message 35: by Aliya (new)

Aliya (ayilamina222) | 43 comments Djamel wrote: "I am sorry but some who are posting here do not give the impression that they genuinely want to learn about Islam or chat with Muslims or make friends with Muslims...their questions are geared towa..."
i agree with you.....


message 36: by John (new)

John Dreamer | 6 comments La ilaha illa 'llah

Hmm interesting I haven't checked this post in a long time, thank you for all your replies. I myself am a Christian and I have recently become very interested in Islam, the religion of peace and submission. I now realize one of the hardest things for you to believe is that Jesus is God incarnate. However I believe that there is no god but the God, simply that he has revealed himself in three persons, and if you perceive nature it is quite astounding that he has separated so many things into threes. Atoms are composed of three parts, while almost all elements have three forms ( liquid, solid, gas). I am not arguing, however I know that it is important what we believe in this life, that there are consequences in the next, for this reason I think we should never hesitate to interject our reason and opinions. We all here believe in the last Day, that all will account for their actions, the only difference is that Christians believe that none are good enough to merit salvation, whereas I know that Islam teaches this. I speak this in love, I am not trying to tear down any beliefs, because I know how they become our identity, Christ is my identity, I follow Christ just as you follow the Qu'ran( Allah's revelation).


message 37: by Femmy (last edited Sep 29, 2010 09:53PM) (new)

Femmy | 120 comments John wrote: "I now realize one of the hardest things for you to believe is that Jesus is God incarnate. However I believe that there is no god but the God, simply that he has revealed himself in three persons..."

John, you are right. Islam teaches that Jesus is a human being. Believing that he is God is Shirk, the greatest sin of all, because it means that we're believing in another god other than God. I believe this is also a violation of the first of the Ten Commandments.

I've heard Christians trying to explain the Trinity, including your argument about the elements having three forms, but none of them is able to make me believe in the Trinity. If God does reveal himself in three persons, why is Jesus subordinate to God the Father? Why does he pray to God the Father? It just doesn't make sense to me. It's more logical if Jesus is an ordinary man, and that's why he acts like he is not equal to God, that's why he prays to God.


message 38: by John (last edited Sep 29, 2010 10:53PM) (new)

John Dreamer | 6 comments Ah that's the word I was looking for, Shirk. Yes he did not consider equality with God something to be grasped, but took the form of a servant even the point of death. You see he prayed because he was fully man and fully God, we follow Jesus because he gave us THE example of love and truth. In our lives it is important to be pray constantly in communication with God, sickness is healed, love fills the hearts of those who hate, shame filled sinners are restored to wonderful life, this the Christ we serve and believe in. In Islam I know you believe that God is omnipotent, able to do anything, he is not limited to our human minds he does amazing things. We are like ants in comparison to Allah, however if Allah were to come down as ant to spread his message, would he not show his love in an even greater sense? God is quite able. Three is a holy number that God uses in the Jewish scriptures many times, the angels cried out Holy, Holy, Holy is the LORD. Again I simply explain why I believe, you understand that we will all stand before God on Judgment Day, it is important we know the truth.

It says in the Qu'ran sura 2:62 Surely those who believe, and those who are Jews, and the Christians, and the Sabians, whoever believes in Allah and the Last day and does good, they shall have their reward from their Lord, and there is no fear for them, nor shall they grieve.

As I understand this verse, Allah simply means God, I believe in God I worship him, I personally know him. My relationship with him means everything to me. I also understand that the Prophet meant monotheistic Christians. I reaffirm I believe in one God, simply that he has been revealed in three persons.


message 39: by John (new)

John Dreamer | 6 comments And please do not think I am walking all over your beliefs, you desire to know God I understand this. Take this in love and not condescendingly.


message 40: by dj (new)

dj | 6 comments Please ask scholars of Islam about Islam if you are really interested in knowing about Islam.Asking a person why you are muslim is not a good beginning...why yourself are christian,pagan or buddhist...why are not you muslim...


message 41: by Femmy (last edited Sep 29, 2010 11:22PM) (new)

Femmy | 120 comments Hi John, I don't think you're walking all over my beliefs, don't worry about that. We welcome discussions about Islam, so don't hesitate to voice your opinion and ask questions.

Anyway, the Qur'an also says, “The Messiah – Jesus, son of Mary – was only a Messenger of God, and His word which He conveyed to Mary and a spirit from Him. So believe in God and His Messengers, and do not say: 'Three'. Cease! It is better for you. God is only One. Far removed is it from His Transcendent Majesty that He should have a son." (The Holy Qur'an, 4:171)

I guess this is one of the fundamental differences between Islam and Christianity. You say three (or one in three, or three in one, however you want to phrase it), but we say one. We do not say three.


message 42: by John (new)

John Dreamer | 6 comments Yes I am familiar with what the Qur'an says of Christ. In one part Allah asks Jesus if he said that he was God and Jesus says that he did not. Again it truly depends on who you believe, the Bible or the Koran. Djamel I am a Christian because Christ met me in my darkest hour, when I wanted nothing to do with God at all, in fact I was on the edge of becoming an atheist, he spoke to me and poured out his love on me. For a year afterward I studied arguments for and against Christ, and I continually am growing in him, its a wonderful way of living, no condemnation or shame yet my deepest desire is to not sin, but to please my heavenly Father because he loved me first. Yes we do disagree on this but I am always hopeful that Christ is made real to all, because it is hard to comprehend something that has not supernaturally be made real ( as Muslims believe the Koran is supernatural). Yet I love how Paul calls us living letters of God, by our actions and thoughts we try and honor God. Anyways, thats why I'm a Christian =). I love to hear others share their love for God that is why I ask.


message 43: by Patricia (new)

Patricia (laylah) | 2 comments Wendy wrote: "If Mohammed was sent as a prophet to all people, it might have been helpful if the Quran was sent in another language other than Arabic."

Hi
I just wanted to say one thing in regards to this comment.. would the Quran sound the same if it was brought in any other language.. my opinion only but if it was sung as it is in any other language I don't think it would move people they way it does as it does in Arabic.

Laylah


message 44: by Halik (new)

Halik (whacko) | 35 comments John wrote: "Yes I am familiar with what the Qur'an says of Christ. In one part Allah asks Jesus if he said that he was God and Jesus says that he did not. Again it truly depends on who you believe, the Bible o..."

Hi John

A big part of what strengthened my faith in Islam is how much it appeals to your reason. At no point does the Quran attempt to tell you to believe anything unless it appeals to your reason. At a fundamental level, man is a logical and intellectual being. Logic and the ability to use our intellect are gifts given to us by God most high.

There are more than a thousand verses in the glorious Quran that deal with science. It has laid out scientific fact centuries before humans ever understood them (e.g. the structure of the universe, quantum physics and biology- the human embryo) for instance. Here's a good place you can view some of these points at http://scienceislam.com


message 45: by [deleted user] (new)

i converted when i was 16 years old to islam after two of my brothers did, and it was a really interesting journey to change my faith because i've been going to a catholic school since i was in 6th grade. i've always been moderately religious, and a firm believer in God, but when i actually took the time to compare and contrast islam and christianity, i found islam intriguing. that's not to say that christians are wrong, because there are alot of similarities. i think the basic difference is that muslims don't believe in the Holy trinity, but they value Jesus as a very high Prophet. And they also believe in Prophet Mohammad (pbuh). besides that, most of the values and beliefs are kind of the same.
i guess it just depends on what a person truly believes, and how well you actually follow what you believe.


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