The Silver Chair (Chronicles of Narnia, #4) The Silver Chair discussion


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Chronicles of Narnia

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message 1: by Kate (last edited Aug 25, 2016 12:03PM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Kate I enjoyed The Silver Chair the most out of the Chronicles of Narnia series. I tried to paint the silver apple with the blood-red core when I was in high school (and failed miserably.)


message 2: by chris (new)

chris papalexandrou The Silver Chair. Isn't that a band?


message 3: by Ann (new) - rated it 4 stars

Ann I have yet to read "Horse and His Boy" or "Magician's Nephew" but so far yes, "Silver Chair" is one of my favorites!:)


Magda anyone can explain me where did you see Christian idea or Christian idea not liking non Christians?
Book has nothing to do with it. Maybe if you were true Christian you would know it.


Reading Faerie I loved the Silver Chair. It is one of my favorites. My other favorite is the Magician's Nephew.


Giancarlo Magda wrote: "anyone can explain me where did you see Christian idea or Christian idea not liking non Christians?
Book has nothing to do with it. Maybe if you were true Christian you would know it."


C.S. Lewis wrote the entire series based on the idea of Christianity, basically, for children; to introduce them into the concepts, in a more easy way tahn the bible does.
Phillip Pullman wrote The Golden Compass, in response to this, because he declared himself as an agnostic atheist.

You can find christian elements, in Lewis's books,almost all of them, such as Aslan´s sacrifice, White Witch being the evil, and the way Aslan interact with the characters in the seven books.


message 7: by Brian (last edited Jan 12, 2012 09:02AM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Brian Allison Magda wrote: "anyone can explain me where did you see Christian idea or Christian idea not liking non Christians?
Book has nothing to do with it. Maybe if you were true Christian you would know it."


All of the books have some subtle biblical teachings. Just a few examples. In "The Horse and His Boy," Aslan states that his plan for one person is of no concern to someone else (mirrors the Bible's teaching about God's will and personal accountability). In "...Dawn Treader," Lucy and Edmund are told to look for Aslan on earth, but that he is called by another name (a reference to Jesus Christ). In the "Magician's Nephew," Aslan creates Narnia with his voice, referencing Jesus as the Creator who spoke the worlds into being ex nihilo (out of nothing). "The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe" is probably the strongest of his allegories, as Giancarlo mentioned (Aslan's sacrifice and resurrection). And "The Last Battle" displays a lot of Lewis' personal thoughts on the Christian religion, as well as other religions.

But, interestingly enough, C.S. Lewis claimed that he did not intend them to be allegories and any religious references that you can find are only "suppositions" made by the reader. I'll stop now. :-)


Magda I was reading them in the order they were written and up until Silver Chair I did not see any allegories.
Yes if you try really hard you can see some subtle teachings but also if you know religions making the world is from old testament which is also included in Jewish teachings. Jesus wasn't creator. Jesus was son of God and God was creator. So you cannot say it was Christianity. You can just take book for what it is and enjoy it.


message 9: by CJ (new) - added it

CJ Scurria You must assume that Jesus was son of God and He was God. The bible says that Jesus said "The Father and I are one." Sometimes when people talk about Jesus they also mean God.

That is how Aslan (representing Jesus) created Narnia. It was the only allegory to God. . . he was not visible in a way that he could be put into The Magician's Nephew so Aslan represented God (he was two lions. . . they meet the "Alpha" the one who will be in the beginning. . . and the other one they cannot see but they seem to fear it. . . is the "omega" the end).

It took me a lot of time and one night my mind realized it. Reading C.S. Lewis is so neat!


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