THE JAMES MASON COMMUNITY BOOK CLUB discussion

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AUTHORS-FORUMS- CHECK OUT ALL! > AUTHOR FORUM- PAUL SIEGELL

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message 1: by Rick (new)

Rick F. | 12878 comments Mod
Paul Siegell, poet

Kick-starting his college-bound road trip, Paul Siegell entered the Long Island Expressway at Exit 35 and thus began his course in bounce-abouting. “Let’s get into the song!” Having lived in the midst of the Cathedral of Learning, then the Magic Kingdom, Stone Mountain and now the Liberty Bell, he currently bikes, or buses, to a building where newspapers are published, and there he writes for a living, but not as a journalist.

Paul Siegell is the author of the forthcoming wild life rifle fire (Otoliths Books, 2010), jambandbootleg (A-Head Publishing, 2009) and Poemergency Room (Otoliths Books, 2008). Paul’s also published the e-chap JΔM> (ungovernable press, 2008). He is a staff editor at Painted Bride Quarterly, and has contributed to The American Poetry Review, Coconut, No Tell Motel, Rattle and many other fine journals. Paul also has a facebook group, currently with over 1,200 members (http://bit.ly/523IWD). Kindly find more of Paul’s work at his “ReVeLeR @ eYeLeVeL” (http://paulsiegell.blogspot.com).

* jambandbootleg (A-Head Publishing, Nicasio, CA; July 1, 2009), 122 pages.

Wait till you see what some of these poems look like! A widespread, high-spirited head rush. What was the last concert you went to? If you are looking for exhilaration in new writing, if you’re looking for all out life-leaping, for your eyes to widen, for a book of poetry that channels the excitement of scoring tickets to your favorite band, and then follows that sensation by nailing down the all-senses experience of actually going to the show, then Paul Siegell’s second collection, jambandbootleg, is yours for the raging. With sound, shape and sophistication, check it out over at A-Head Publishing (http://bit.ly/RpRIo).

• Reviews: Amazon: http://bit.ly/sUINZ
• Interview: BOOKSLUT: http://bit.ly/24R6xl
• Profile: Gypsy Art Show: http://bit.ly/10ABbn
• Review: RELIX Magazine: http://bit.ly/2Bm0Ou
• Review: Black Ocean: http://bit.ly/1oThr8
• Review: Surrender to the Flow: http://bit.ly/4jNWCP
• Review: Goodreads: http://bit.ly/3QAx0a

* Poemergency Room (Otoliths Books, Australia; Jan. 18, 2008), 116 pages.

“Something HUGE flexes joy here! This is the suicide by cop where banging cymbals rip the portal open! Poetry is the daily political at every mouthful of Siegell as dots connect dimension to dementia! Tell the funeral director I’d like my coffin lined with these pages, preventing a death of the sleeping! Careful, nutjobs, this is a brother of the Vibratory Order! THANK YOU, Paul Siegell, for making some real live fucking magic for us!” —CAConrad

• Publisher’s site: http://bit.ly/4OnwRA
• Review: Amazon: http://bit.ly/8BpKP
• Review: Paste Magazine: http://bit.ly/3P1Zj3
• Review: Gently Read Literature: http://bit.ly/Q0DSN
• Review: WEAVE: http://bit.ly/GMyz5
• Review: PhillySound: http://bit.ly/7S3wX
• Interview: Bookslut: http://bit.ly/lVz25
• Interview: Philadelphia City Paper: http://bit.ly/3OCs6V
• Review: Goodreads: http://bit.ly/41YiUw


*TEAM PLAYERS*

what are these words, friends,
shuffling their letters, about? what star
ry-eyed sport could spell and cast them
into asterism, the unheard of listenables?
my notebook’s blanks are becoming few
er. let the nude let the bottle even milk,
let it all hours pour. let the pen drain die
scratch. the draft in the bathroom is flutter
ing the toilet paper dangling from the win
dowsill. waverly. ledge. the habits of the
horizon have my mind on a milk carton.
planet is greek for wanderer. is this wit
ness relocation? athletic letters ceaseles
sly switching teams? perhaps olympiads
eapfrogging on and off the podium of
use? and from where will the next note
book come? it’s friends not facilities,
words not worries.

http://paulsiegell.blogspot.com


message 2: by Rick (new)

Rick F. | 12878 comments Mod
what books and/or Authors have influenced not only yout style of writing- but the genre in which you choose to write about?


message 3: by Paul (new)

Paul Siegell (PaulSiegell) | 16 comments A Clockwork Orange (“What’s it gonna be then, eh?”), Tender Buttons, Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test (“That’s good thinking there, Cool Breeze.”), On the Road (“I first met Dean Moriarty after my wife and I split up.”), Howl, Kaddish, Leaves of Grass, GASOLINE, and when Mrs. Rajkowski assigned Emerson and Thoreau to us in 7th grade. Washington Irving, too. Reading cereal boxes and the comics section while my dad read the New York Newsday during breakfast before school. Playing with my legos and hearing classic rock bands like Led Zeppelin, The Who, Dylan and the Grateful Dead coming through the wall from my oldest sister’s room. Later playing Nintendo like Super Mario Bros and Legend of Zelda and hearing new wave bands like The Cure, Erasure, Depeche Mode and Alphaville coming through the wall from my other sister’s room. My mom watching Wheel of Fortune and This Old House, and my dad watching the news. She cried when Family Ties ended. He went nuts when the ‘86 Mets won. Cubism, Picasso, Cezanne. Kandinsky. All the museums my dad took me to on birthdays. PITT poetry pros Jeff Oaks, Jan Beatty and Lynn Emanuel. Billboards and road signs along the highway. Thot it was so funny when Sal Paradise raised the flag upside down. Lyricists like Robert Hunter, John Barlow, Tom Marshall, Trey Anastasio, Mike Gordon. Traveling. My friends. Reading tons and tons of poetry being written and published by tons and tons of amazing poets right this very second. Stuff like that.


message 4: by Paul (new)

Paul Siegell (PaulSiegell) | 16 comments Oh, duh. And Lewis Carroll.


message 5: by Rick (new)

Rick F. | 12878 comments Mod
so offbeat- non-comformative style is one that appeals- I recently read some Lewis Carroll- and man!! kids can read it one way- but like The Simpsons- adults can read it another way- there are some mighty nasty characters in Wonderland! Do you utilize characters that seem one way- but to the keen reader- are actually quite a bit more complex?


message 6: by Gary F (new)

Gary F | 244 comments Hi Paul,

great to have you here! I have read a review on Amazon for Jambandbootleg where the reviewer writes "The book's poems communicate experiences that have previously been impossible to explain." How are you able to accomplish this? Does it take many rewritings to get the prose exactly as you want it?


message 7: by Brian (new)

Brian | 346 comments That is the first time I viewed a mention of "The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test". That was a great book. Almost no one I know even heard of that book. Are their any other goodreads members besides Paul whom enjoyed it? I read tons of peotry too Paul, did you read some of Robert Service's poems? My favorite is "The Road Not Taken".




message 8: by Gary (new)

Gary | 123 comments do you mean, robert frost? brian?


message 9: by Brian (new)

Brian | 346 comments Hmmm...you sure know your poetry Gary. For some reason I confuse Robert Frost and Robert Service. Both were introduced in Grade 9. You are correct. Also read from both authors at the same time. Liked that poem so much I had it printed out and framed! You may be able to help me with a famous female poet around the early 70's. I just can not figure out who she is. On one of your previous posts, we are quite similar whereas I began reading poetry around the same time as you. I thoroughly enjoyed a famous female poet whom wrote a book containing 1,000 poems. Would search the internet but have little to go on. It was not children poems and I must have read the book at least 5 times. I would love to get my hands on that one. Around 1970-71.


message 10: by Gary (new)

Gary | 123 comments is it Sylvia Plath, who also wrote THE BELL JAR? she committed suicide, which the book deals with.


message 11: by Gary (new)

Gary | 123 comments Robert Frost is a favorite of mine,and his poem, THE ROAD NOT TAKEN is a favorite. I actually use it in my classroom,and it's amazing how when I read it aloud, how my 5th graders can understand it,and have quite the discussion about it.


message 12: by Brian (new)

Brian | 346 comments wow, that name sounds familar. I have been trying to think of the name for years. Sounds like a strong lead. It is nice to know some Robert Frost fans. 5th graders? Holy smokes!!! Students are learning great peotry so much younger, as mentioned I started enjoying his poems in Grade 9. That is fantastic to hear. In my opinion both Robert Frost and Service were literary geniuses. I am sure it must be thrilling for you to see the same positive feedback from students about authors you enjoy. I know I would be..


message 13: by Gary (last edited Jan 07, 2010 12:10PM) (new)

Gary | 123 comments Let me know if Sylvia Plath is the one. I've read her book BELL JAR, but not any of her poetry. I am a big poetry fan, and enjoy it.If it is her,and you get a book of her poetry to read, I'll read it with you,and we can talk about it. If not, maybe you could share some other hints with me,and we can find who it is together,and then read them at the same time. It's like a challenge,and I'd like to help you find her!!!

Yeah, I just decided to try ROAD one year, because the poetry in my school materials suck,and I've done it now since, and like I said amazed on how the "kids" get it. The secret is reading poetry aloud. I also read some Emily Dickinson,and later the kids tell me how they read her,and show an interest while in my class.

I give my students a copy of A CHRISTMAS CAROL by Charles Dickens for Christmas,and they start to read,and many, not all, but many finish the book,and love it. You can actually get them for 90 cents a piece online, if you order multiple copies. I can share the website with you, if you'd like! Kids are not exposed to classic literature anymore in our classrooms at high schools. I am trying really hard to instill a love of it when I have them in hopes that they will read more when they get older,and demand from their teachers to be reading more of it in their high school classes!! I also read aloud Mark Twain, Edgar Allan Poe,and also a chapter from MOBY DICK. (After they stop snickering over the name of the novel. Dirty minds start in 5th grade if you can believe it, but when I read the chapter you can hear a pin drop. They listen,and hang on every word!)


message 14: by Gary (last edited Jan 07, 2010 12:27PM) (new)

Gary | 123 comments in your profile, brian. you have A ROAD NOT TAKEN listed as written by Robert Service. Don't mean to be picky, but hope you'll edit,and change that. Thanks! I hope you don't think I am being a total bastard/bitch for pointing that out to you.

Still my new friend??? I sure hope between the two of us that we can find your poet!!!

Best,

Gary


message 15: by Gary (last edited Jan 07, 2010 12:28PM) (new)

Gary | 123 comments for the life of me, I can't remember ever hearing of Robert Service. Can you share with me one of his writings that's your favorite? thanks! g.


message 16: by Gary (new)

Gary | 123 comments i just found it. Did some internet research,and now I remember where i've heard about robert service. THE CREMATION OF SAM MCGEE!!!!


message 17: by Brian (new)

Brian | 346 comments I can not help it, that is funny! Yes, I will edited today. Thanks for pointing that out. Simply read those two great authors in the same year so the mistake is a natural one. Epecially since it was three decades ago. Not offended at all, I prefer to be corrected when it is on my profile and to a lesser estent on forum posts. For sure, will have to spend some web time. I will start with 1,000 poems, female poet, around 1970-71. It would be fun to read it at the same time. I remember being very impressed and the book was heavy to carry all over the place.. Cool idea Gary!


message 18: by Brian (last edited Jan 07, 2010 02:53PM) (new)

Brian | 346 comments Gary, this may help. He was very diverse in the genre of the many books he wrote, born in England. "Collected Poems" by Robert W. Service (I read that book), I recommend this book highly. It is a fanatic poet readers icon. "Biography of Stalin", "Lenin", so many more. He was epecially interested in Russian history. I finished a book this past December called "Alexander The Great, Conquerer of Napolean", great book. Robert Service raises the bar much more with a book from Alexander the Great to present day. Hope this helps, best I can do with short notice. I can provide much more details in awhile if you wish. He published an amazing ammount of books. His writings were taught in just about every Canadian school. He achieved world wide success status for sure. There is an amazing ammount of books listed in the goodreads data base. He definately conversed with Robert Frost also. He was actually born in England much to my surprise as I viewed the printout. Moved to Canada after and thus a Canadian citizen. Hmm..learn something new all the time!

Pt. 2....Yes THE CREMATION OF SAM MCGEE! January 16-1874,September 11,1958. He also published "The Songs of a Sourdough" in England. In addition to his Yukon works, Service also wrote in locales as diverse as South Africa, Afghanistan, and New Zealand.

Honours; Robert W. Service has been honoured with schools named for him Including Service High School, honoured on a Canadian postage stamp in 1976, and several buildings dedicated to him.


message 19: by Brian (new)

Brian | 346 comments Interesting Rick, although claimed to be a "Canadian" author. Do you not think he would be more correctly listed as an English author also? He was born in England and published some books exclusively there at first.


message 20: by Brian (last edited Jan 07, 2010 04:04PM) (new)

Brian | 346 comments Hi Gary, I read at least one of her books. Her bio just blew me away. Pulizer Prize winner?!! So many accolades to her credit. My timeframe is off somewhat, what I am looking for would be anywhere from 1971 to 1975. People found it odd that I carried that hardcover book almost everywhere. Already started my search. Best guess is 1,001 poems hence the long duration of the book and the cover was blue. Not much to go one. Distant memories are as you know like photocopying something a thousand times...faded..that is what I have to work with. Best guess is I would have been 8 years old as I remember my kidsitter was delighted to bring me to a park and not have to worry for I woud be intensely focused on that book. Judging by the covers and the number of pages it was not Sylvia Plath.


message 21: by Gary (new)

Gary | 123 comments Well,I have a book of 1,000 poems by Emily Dickinson. Maybe it was a new edition of her poems? Was the woman a living author in the early 70's then? Would your parents remember since you carried it around a lot. Maybe ask them? What happened to the book? Maybe it's in the attic somewhere or something?


message 22: by Brian (new)

Brian | 346 comments Good questions Gary! Hmmm...if it was published in the 1960's then it would be a female poet of that era. However, the book I am looking for could easily have been published in the 1800's. My mother may know, I will ask her. Reading Emily Dickison's bio and descriptions of her poetry, it is quite possible she is the author. As soon as you posted the name, recogintion exploded into my mind. I just know I read some of her awesome poetry. Her writing style would fit also, using metaphors, for example. Her writing techniques are the cornerstones of great literature. Possibly introduced in elemntary school or if not, discovered by my own accord from the many trips to the library. I will go to the local library and check out some of her books..thanks. I remember the poetry to be indepth which is her style also.


message 23: by Gary (new)

Gary | 123 comments Keep me posted when you figure out if it's really Emily. I have a lot to tell you about Emily. To start off, I studied her in college, in depth... to continue... well, let me know if it's her.

gary


message 24: by Martha (new)

Martha | 23 comments Hi Paul.

I'm visiting from my author forum and am very happy to add your book to my "to read" list. I'm a word junkie and one of the few people I know who really enjoys experimental writing. Even if you wouldn't put your work in that category, you do seem to play with/create words in the way that makes language so fabulous, with the notion that language is a living thing and therefore meant to continually change.


message 25: by Paul (new)

Paul Siegell (PaulSiegell) | 16 comments Rick wrote: "Do you utilize characters that seem one way- but to the keen reader- are actually quite a bit more complex?"

Rick, yes, and thank you for your question! I am a firm believer that it’s sometimes very fun to be underestimated, or to have a piece of writing be underestimated. Say I’m writing about someone who’s not quite altogether there, intoxicated or something, (take this poem in the current RATTLE, for example: http://bit.ly/7YEG0t) and the piece is pretty forward and funny b/c she’s at a summer concert and masturbating in public and all, but if the writing can get the reader past the surface of the act and have greater consideration be taken to what sadness is actually going on, and what that all means in a sense greater than one person, then the piece goes beyond its entertainment value and even its artists value, and then maybe it finds itself with a cultural value, on a broader scale. Possibilities like those EXCITE me.





message 26: by Paul (new)

Paul Siegell (PaulSiegell) | 16 comments Gary wrote: "I have read a review on Amazon for Jambandbootleg where the reviewer writes "The book's poems communicate experiences that have previously been impossible to explain." How are you able to accomplish this? Does it take many rewritings to get the prose exactly as you want it?

Hi Gary, thanks so much for checking out the other reviews, and for reaching out with such a great question--And a tough one at that. When that review (http://bit.ly/sUINZ ) came in, I was shocked. How’s that for a gigantic compliment? Made me feel like I was getting “it” right? At least to that reviewer. Ha!

But how did I do it? He’s referring to the poems in jambandbootleg that are about live concert experiences. My friends and I go to a lot of shows, and when I can, I write about them. Trying to get the feel of the music, and the crowd, down onto paper. Usually what happens is I’m dancing like crazy and having a great time, and I start to “hear” a few lines in my head, be it descriptions of what I’m seeing on stage, or of the people dancing around me, or something interesting in the music, and then I take it from there. Perhaps I put them into my cell phone so I don’t forget, or just lay it down when I get home. Then, yeah, grind it out.

I’m a pretty big on revision. I’ll read it and read it until I don’t resist anything. Until nothing is hanging me up. Until I can read it all the way to the end, and once I get there I can go, ‘Wow. That’s good.’ May take one day, may take two weeks, may take three years. Lovin’ every second of it!

How about you? Do you revise?



message 27: by Paul (new)

Paul Siegell (PaulSiegell) | 16 comments Brian wrote: "That is the first time I viewed a mention of "The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test". That was a great book. Almost no one I know even heard of that book. Are their any other goodreads members besides Pa..."

Hi Brian, gotta love Tom Wolfe! Back in college, Acid Test was the first novel I read that really felt like a poem. Got me so energized. Was my kind of writing! So lyrical and adventurous with language. Plus, the subject matter was fascinating to me. All the extremes and mighty, real-life characters of crazy and greatness.

Icons. Archetypes. Wild mentors of America.

As for the great Robert Service/Robert Frost discussion you’ve got going here, yes, I’ve read and enjoyed both. Back during the summer of ‘03 I was up working in Alaska and one day we took a bus tour through Denali National Park and the bus driver offered up one of Service’s Yukon poems, The Spell of the Yukon. A great surprise! The driver reveled and sung with such twinkle and smile, you could really tell he loved his job and what he did every day. I always think of that bus driver when someone mentions Robert Service. It was the greatest reading of a poem I’ve ever witnessed.

Thanks for getting me to remember it again!


message 28: by Rick (new)

Rick F. | 12878 comments Mod
Martha wrote: "Hi Paul.

I'm visiting from my author forum and am very happy to add your book to my "to read" list. I'm a word junkie and one of the few people I know who really enjoys experimental writing. Even ..."


Paul, I see exactly what you are alluding to- do you set out to provide a message and in mid-poem- find that the message or image has changed and go with it? or do you write the original poem and a new one with the altered theme?



message 29: by Paul (new)

Paul Siegell (PaulSiegell) | 16 comments Martha wrote: "in the way that makes language so fabulous..."

Hi, Martha! From one word junkie to another, it’s very nice to meet you. Thanks so much for visiting and taking a look at my work. And I agree with you: “language is a living thing and therefore meant to continually change.” Absolutely. There’s so much great work to be done! And there are many great poets out there right now, doing just that.

I’m always amazed when I can find something in the spelling of a word, or in the pleasure of a phrase, that adds something new to what I know about the language, and maybe even to the world as a whole. Much of my Poemergency Room can be seen as me going as far as I can go. (Maybe to a fault – Yikes!) And then my jambandbootleg tries to take it even further. Whenever possible.

Dunno, writing is like my space shuttle. It’s my “break free from the boredom” necessity. And I’ve a feeling you know exactly what I mean. Thanks again!


message 30: by Gary F (new)

Gary F | 244 comments Paul wrote: "Gary wrote: "I have read a review on Amazon for Jambandbootleg where the reviewer writes "The book's poems communicate experiences that have previously been impossible to explain." How are you able..."

Thanks, that is very cool to hear your process. I definitely revise and think it is almost a disservice to not try to improve upon what is essentially a first draft.


message 31: by Brian (last edited Jan 13, 2010 10:09AM) (new)

Brian | 346 comments Yes, that is true Gary. I have been writing poetry for twenty years. Sometimes, the first draft is the first. Many times I write a rough draft with notations with ideas on how to improve the poem. Often the final draft is so different than the original. One very appealing ascept of writing poems is, to state it losely, playing with words. Most of the time I end up with the original draft, a revised one and a copy of some that were published. I organize them meticulously that way. It is fun for me and I use foreshadowing, iliteration and metaphors. The very few that I have shown them to always tell me to do something with them instead of a hobby. One reason I love poetry is I have wrote many myself.


message 32: by Brian (last edited Jan 13, 2010 10:24AM) (new)

Brian | 346 comments To Paul. It is great to hear from other fans of Robert Service and Frost. Yes, he is a legend in Canada, even more so in the Yukon. Nation pride has nothing to do with my fondness of those two authors. I actually consider Robert Service British than Canadian. He was born there, lived a fair amount of his life there and published some of his writings exclusively in England. Fairly Mowat, is Canadian and I am not much of a fan of his work although he is considered on of the best from Canada.

"The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test" I would have to reread, I do not remember much of the book. Just that is was weird, off the wall but I really liked it.




message 33: by Rick (new)

Rick F. | 12878 comments Mod
Brian wrote: "To Paul. It is great to hear from other fans of Robert Service and Frost. Yes, he is a legend in Canada, even more so in the Yukon. Nation pride has nothing to do with my fondness of those two auth..."

info on Robert Service

Robert William Service (January 16, 1874 – September 11, 1958) was a poet and writer, sometimes referred to as "the Bard of the Yukon".[1:][2:] He is best-known for his writings on the Canadian North, including the poems "The Shooting of Dan McGrew", "The Law of the Yukon", and "The Cremation of Sam McGee". His writing was so expressive that his readers took him for a hard-bitten old Klondike prospector, not the later-arriving bank clerk he actually was.

In addition to his Yukon works, Service also wrote poetry set in locales as diverse as South Africa, Afghanistan, and New Zealand. His writing has a decidedly British Empire point of view.

Contents [hide:]
1 Early life
2 Writing career
3 Robert Service's cabin, Dawson City
4 Honours
5 The works of Robert W. Service
6 Notes
7 External links


[edit:] Early life

Commemorative Plaque in Preston, EnglandService was born into a Scottish family while they were living in Preston, England. He was schooled in Scotland, attending Hillhead High School in Glasgow. He moved to Canada at the age of 21 when he gave up his job working in a Glasgow bank, and travelled to Vancouver Island, British Columbia with his Buffalo Bill outfit and dreams of becoming a cowboy. He drifted around western North America, taking and quitting a series of jobs. Hired by the Canadian Bank of Commerce, he worked in a number of its branches before being posted to the branch in Whitehorse (not Dawson) in the Yukon Territory in 1904, six years after the Klondike Gold Rush.[3:] Inspired by the vast beauty of the Yukon wilderness, Service began writing poetry about the things he saw. Conversations with locals led him to write about things he hadn't seen, many of which hadn't actually happened, as well.[4:] He did not set foot in Dawson City until 1908, arriving in the Klondike ten years after the Gold Rush,[5:] but his renown as a writer was already established.

[edit:] Writing career

Robert Service Memorial, Kilwinning, Ayrshire.Service became known for his work about the West and the Yukon gold miners. Such works as "The Shooting of Dan McGrew" and "The Cremation of Sam McGee" made him famous around the world. After having collected enough poems for a book, Service offered a publisher $100 of his own money to publish the work, but the publisher was so sure that the works would be popular (he had already taken 1700 offers for sale off the galley proofs), he returned Service's money and offered him a contract.

The book was published in 1907 in North America as The Spell of the Yukon and Other Verses and in England as The Songs of a Sourdough. This made Service wealthy and he became known as the "Canadian Kipling". Within two years he was able to quit his job at the bank, and to travel to Paris, the French Riviera, Hollywood, and beyond. During his time in Paris he was reputedly the wealthiest author living in the city, yet was known to dress as a working man and walk the streets, blending in and observing everything around him. From 1912 to 1913 he was a correspondent for the Toronto Star during the Balkan Wars.

Service served during World War I; he was a British subject, and worked as an ambulance driver for the Canadian Red Cross, as well as working as a war correspondent for the Canadian government. He wrote a number of poems about the war, many appearing in a new book, The Rhymes of a Red-Cross Man, in 1916. Some of these, along with his earlier "The March of the Dead" about the Boer War, were put to music and compiled into the anti-war album War, War, War by "Country" Joe McDonald in 1971. Many of Service's poems celebrated duty to country in war, and although he often pointed out the sacrifice of the common soldier in war, he could not be considered an "anti-war" writer. His brother, Lieutenant Albert Service, Canadian Infantry, was killed in action in France in August 1916. [6:]

Service is also noted for his use of ethnonyms that would normally be considered offensive "slurs", but with no insult apparently intended. Words used in Service's poetry include jerries (Germans), dago (Italian), pickaninny (in reference to a Mozambican infant), cheechako (newcomer to the Yukon and Alaska gold fields, usually from the U.S.), nigger (African-American), squaw (Aboriginal woman), and Jap (Japanese).

Service married Germaine Bougeoin, a Parisian, and they purchased a summer home in the Brittany region of France. Thirteen years younger, she lived 31 years following Service's death, dying at age 102 in 1989. At the outbreak of World War II, Service was present during the German invasion of Poland. He fled the country, returning to North America. He remained in Hollywood until the war's end. He then returned to his home in Brittany, where he lived until his death in 1958, though he wintered in Monte Carlo and the French Riviera. Throughout all this, Service remained a British subject and carried a British passport.

Service wrote two volumes of autobiography - Ploughman of the Moon and Harper of Heaven.

He died in Lancieux, Côtes-d'Armor, in Brittany, and is buried there in the local cemetery.

[edit:] Robert Service's cabin, Dawson City
Robert Service lived between 1909 and 1912 in a log cabin on 8th Avenue in Dawson City, Yukon. His relative prosperity allowed him the luxury of a telephone. After he left for Europe, the Imperial Order of the Daughters of the Empire (I.O.D.E.) took care of the house until 1971, preserving it. Service eventually decided he could not return to Dawson, as it would not be as he remembered it.

In 1971, the Service cabin was taken over by Parks Canada, which maintains it, including its sod roof, as a tourist attraction. Irish-born actor Tom Byrne created The Robert Service Show which was presented in the front yard of the cabin, starting in 1976. This was very popular for summer visitors and set the standard for Robert Service recitations. A resurgence in sales of Service's works followed the institution of these performances.

Mr. Byrne discontinued the show at the cabin in 1995, moving it to a Front Street storefront. Since 2004 the show has been held at the Westmark Hotel in Dawson City at 3:00 p.m. every day during the summer months. Mr. Byrne is a collector of Robert Service first editions, and corresponded with Mr. Service's widow for many years prior to her death. Local Dawson entertainers dressed in period costume and employed by Parks Canada offer biographical information and recite Service's poetry for visitors sitting on benches on the front lawn. Johnny Nunan performed this role through 2006. The present performer shares his first name (Fred). Following the presentation, visitors can view Service's home through the windows and front door. The fragility of the house, and the rarity of the artifacts, precludes any possibility of allowing visitors to enter the house itself.

[edit:] Honours
Robert W. Service has been honoured with schools named for him including Service High School in Anchorage, Alaska, Robert Service Middle School in Toronto, Ontario[7:] and Robert Service School in Dawson City, Yukon.[8:] He was also honoured on a Canadian postage stamp in 1976. The Robert Service Way, a main road in Whitehorse, is named after him. Additionally, the Bard & Banker public house in Victoria, British Columbia is dedicated to him, the building having at one time been a Canadian Bank of Commerce branch where Service was employed while residing in the city.[9:]

[edit:] The works of Robert W. Service
The Spell of the Yukon (1905)
The Song of the Wage Slave (1915)
Ballads of a Bohemian (1921)
Ballads of a Cheechako (1909)
Bar-Room Ballads (1940)
The Rhymes of a Red-cross Man (1916)
Rhymes of a Rolling Stone (1912)
The Songs of a Sourdough (Published in the U.S. as The Spell of the Yukon and Other Verses) (1907)
The House of Fear, A Novel (1927)
The Master of the Microbe (1926)
The Ordinary Man
Ploughman of the Moon, An Adventure Into Memory (1945)
The Poisoned Paradise (1922)
The Pretender. A story of the Latin quarter (1914)
The Roughneck, A Tale of Tahiti (1923)
The Trail of Ninety-Eight, A Northland Romance (1910)
Why Not Grow Young? or Living for Longevity (1928)
The Ballad of the Ice-Worm Cocktail
Bob Smart's Dream
The March of the Dead
Carols of an Old Codger
Trail of Ninety-Eight
The call of the wild (poem)[10:]
The Cremation of Sam McGee
The Shooting of Dan McGrew



message 34: by Brian (last edited Jan 13, 2010 04:34PM) (new)

Brian | 346 comments great info. Rick. I provided Gary with a much shorter version of his history. Yes, his writing style is distinct. As you pointed out he wrote from a British point of view. As stated I consider him more of a British writer, we kind of borrowed him. Legendary status taught in every school in Canada. I first read his most popular writings as part of English courses in school. I recognize about six of those listed but remember bits and pieces of only two. It is fun to share information on authors. Thanks!


message 35: by Rick (new)

Rick F. | 12878 comments Mod
Brian wrote: "great info. Rick. I provided Gary with a much shorter version of his history. Yes, his writing style is distinct. As you pointed out he wrote from a British point of view. As stated I consider him ..."

very welcome Brian
I love reading about the lives of the writers almost as much as reading their works- since it is very much a fact that their works are often a product of their lives- ie- Emile Zola


message 36: by Brian (last edited Jan 13, 2010 04:51PM) (new)

Brian | 346 comments same hear, if I am fascinated by an author or contributer to literature I will read the biography. Some are the biography of Einstien, Dr Henry A Kissinger (slow reading, everything he wrote was not simplistic. A Harvard professor and it sure showed in his dissertations), Agatha Christie and more I have not listed on my profile yet. Never heard of Emile Zole. When you have time can you give me some details? Many have very interesting lives and are as interesting to read as their books, like Thorton Wilder, for instance.


message 37: by Paul (new)

Paul Siegell (PaulSiegell) | 16 comments Rick wrote: "...do you set out to provide a message and in mid-poem- find that the message or image has changed and go with it? or do you write the original poem and a new one with the altered theme?"

Hi Rick, great question. Took me a minute to think about that one. Process.

Here's what I got. This week, one of the poems I wrote started out as an exuberant piecing together of a bunch of things I had in my notebook. It was about a page long and kinda wild. Lots of twists and a healthy amount of play. It felt great for about two days, then as I kept reading it I noticed that I had two poems in there.

So, I abandoned it, pulled out what I felt could make a stronger piece and started re-crafting. Now I've got a MUCH stronger piece, shorter too, and when I get around to it, I'll farm the pieces left over and rework the other half. That's poetry!

I go with whatever's stronger.



message 38: by Rick (new)

Rick F. | 12878 comments Mod
Paul wrote: "Rick wrote: "...do you set out to provide a message and in mid-poem- find that the message or image has changed and go with it? or do you write the original poem and a new one with the altered them..."
thanks Paul
facinating insights into how you prduce poems!!!




message 39: by Brian (new)

Brian | 346 comments I read your post about Paul's adventure into poetry. Very inspiring! As you know I am very much into poetry so I contacted him for info. about his book. It seems to me reading his own words and some of the great reviews he received about his book, how can one not be intrigued! I sure am, awaiting the end of the month. Also I managed to get the channel TCM (I think it is called that, close in name to another channel).


message 40: by Rick (new)

Rick F. | 12878 comments Mod
Brian wrote: "I read your post about Paul's adventure into poetry. Very inspiring! As you know I am very much into poetry so I contacted him for info. about his book. It seems to me reading his own words and som..."

yes TCM =Turner Classic Movies
not to be confused with TLC- The learning channel(another goodie)



message 41: by Brian (new)

Brian | 346 comments yes, both are very good channels along with 'Discovery" and "History". Last year I made a wholesale change towards more movie channels. In effect it eliminated all the ones I mentioned and more movie channels was a bust! Mostly the same movies on a rotation schedule. So, I am changing packages to get all the "learning" channels back.


message 42: by Paul (new)

Paul Siegell (PaulSiegell) | 16 comments Friends, I just found out that Online Colleges and Universities recently named my site, ReVeLeR @ eYeLeVeL, one of the "30 Awesome Poetry Blogs You Aren’t Reading Yet."

Coming in at #28, please have a look hereHereHERE. Thanks!




message 43: by Rick (new)

Rick F. | 12878 comments Mod
Paul wrote: "Friends, I just found out that Online Colleges and Universities recently named my site, ReVeLeR @ eYeLeVeL, one of the "30 Awesome Poetry Blogs You Aren’t Reading Yet."

Coming in at #28, please h..."

PAUL
CONGRATULATIONS!!!!!!!!
I AM SO HAPPY FOR YOU!!! AND SURE IT IS VERY WELL DESERVED!
SO GLAD YOU ARE A "JAMES MASONER"
RICK




message 44: by Kathleen (new)

Kathleen Wow, congratulations! Heading over to it to check it out (no doubt with a horde of others who are on the brink of discovering you.


message 45: by Paul (last edited Feb 10, 2010 03:31PM) (new)

Paul Siegell (PaulSiegell) | 16 comments Thank you!

GET EXCITED/COMING SOON: wild life rifle fire by Paul Siegell

"Paul Siegell's wild life rifle fire proves, if proof were needed, that the electrifying art of Concrete Poetry is not dead!

Siegell's book-length carmen figuratum not only flashes the reader back to the heady first days of the Noigrandes Group in São Paulo and Eugen Gomringer's adventures in VisPo, but even further back to Medieval anagrams, Greek bucolic poems and Sumerian figure poems. Here we find DaDa dynamite and typographical talismans freshened by a poet whose native gifts imbue this exciting work with a whole new sense of "poetic object."

Siegell's haptic heroism compels the reader to re-examine the basic elements of a language that we too often taken for granted, in the process creating an energetic and always surprising work of both visual art and poetry. Not to be missed!" —Vladimir Slender-Hedge


message 46: by Martha (new)

Martha | 23 comments Got the books, Paul!


message 47: by Paul (new)

Paul Siegell (PaulSiegell) | 16 comments Martha wrote: "Got the books, Paul!"

Thanks again, Martha! So very much!


message 48: by Paul (new)

Paul Siegell (PaulSiegell) | 16 comments JUST PUBLISH'd @ GHOTI MAGAZINE: two concert poems > *05.26.07 JamontheRiver* and *07.27.07 THE JOIN*

here's the link: "splash ride crash hi-hat and sizzle"


message 49: by Paul (new)

Paul Siegell (PaulSiegell) | 16 comments JUST PUBLISH'd (along with Franz Wright, Juliet Cook, Adam Fieled and others) @ Listenlight Poetry > *kaleidoscope for aerodynamics*

here's the link: "it must mean more to astronauts"


message 50: by Paul (new)

Paul Siegell (PaulSiegell) | 16 comments Rick wrote: "PAUL, CONGRATULATIONS!!!!!!!!..."

Brand new TODAY from Otoliths Books: wild life rifle fire

Info from the publisher here and lots more here.

Thanks so much for taking a look!



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