Victoria B.C. (Book Club) discussion

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2010 Reading List > What are you reading?

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message 301: by John (new)

John | 259 comments Mod
I am about to startMistress of the Sun. I hope it is as good as her Josephine Bonaparte trilogy.


message 302: by John (new)

John | 259 comments Mod
I am starting "Roy Rogers and the Rimrod Renegades". Happy Trails to you until we meet again!


message 303: by John (new)

John | 259 comments Mod
Going to start "1984". It has been a really long time since I read this.


message 304: by John (new)

John | 259 comments Mod
Obviously I can't predict the future because I am not starting "1984", I am starting "Brave New World"


message 305: by Dorothy (new)

Dorothy  (Vilette) | 248 comments John wrote: "Obviously I can't predict the future because I am not starting "1984", I am starting "Brave New World""

:-)


message 306: by Roberta (new)

Roberta | 193 comments Both very chilling reads.


message 307: by John (new)

John | 259 comments Mod
For Remembrance Day I am going to read The Longest Night: The Bombing of London on May 10, 1941


message 308: by John (new)

John | 259 comments Mod
To celebrate my daughter's return from 2 1/2 months exploring South America I am going to read Faithful Travellers: A Father, His Daughter, a Journey of the Heart. Dodson takes his daughter and his retriever to find some great fly fishing spots. I really enjoyed Dodson's Final Rounds: A Father, A Son, The Golf Journey Of A Lifetime where he takes his dying father back to where he learned to play golf. The third book of Dodson's I read was The Road to Somewhere - where he and his son travel around Europe.


message 309: by Dorothy (new)

Dorothy  (Vilette) | 248 comments John wrote: "To celebrate my daughter's return from 2 1/2 months exploring South America I am going to read Faithful Travellers: A Father, His Daughter, a Journey of the Heart. Dodson takes his d..."

My Remebrance Day read has turned out to be
A Long Long Way by Sebastian Barry about the battalions of Irish men serving on the Somme. Beautifully written but pulls no punches about the hellish conditions.


message 310: by Elizabeth (new)

Elizabeth Henley | 3 comments I just read a really good book by a local Victoria author--Paris '97 by Eric Hamilton. It's a Princess Diana fiction/mystery book but it's based on facts. Anyone else read it? I loved it and wouldn't mind discussing a few things!


message 311: by Dorothy (new)

Dorothy  (Vilette) | 248 comments Elizabeth wrote: "I just read a really good book by a local Victoria author--Paris '97 by Eric Hamilton. It's a Princess Diana fiction/mystery book but it's based on facts. Anyone else read it? I loved it and wouldn..."

Hi Elizabeth...good to have you join the discussion. I hadn't heard of this book but will look for it in the library.


message 312: by Elizabeth (new)

Elizabeth Henley | 3 comments Dot wrote: "Elizabeth wrote: "I just read a really good book by a local Victoria author--Paris '97 by Eric Hamilton. It's a Princess Diana fiction/mystery book but it's based on facts. Anyone else read it? I l..."

Thanks Dot, I'm happy to be here!


message 313: by Roberta (new)

Roberta | 193 comments Am in the middle of Standing in the Fireand really enjoying it. Managing self in high heat situations - I'm finding it very useful.

Also started New York to give myself some added perspective after the trip there.

And still dipping into poetry. sometimes a poem is exactly what you need/


message 314: by John (new)

John | 259 comments Mod
Elizabeth wrote: "I just read a really good book by a local Victoria author--Paris '97 by Eric Hamilton. It's a Princess Diana fiction/mystery book but it's based on facts. Anyone else read it? I loved it and wouldn..."

Hi Elizabeth. Thanks for the tip on Paris 97. I had never heard of it and didn't realize Eric Wilson and Eric Hamilton were one and the same. I will have to look for the book now.


message 315: by Elizabeth (new)

Elizabeth Henley | 3 comments John wrote: "Elizabeth wrote: "I just read a really good book by a local Victoria author--Paris '97 by Eric Hamilton. It's a Princess Diana fiction/mystery book but it's based on facts. Anyone else read it? I l..."

No worries, John. I didn't know they were the same person either! But now that I've figured that out, I can definitely see the similarities in writing style between Paris 97 and his children's books. I mean that in a good way though! I think Eric Hamilton has done a super job of transitioning into adult literature without losing what he's really about.


message 316: by John (new)

John | 259 comments Mod
I'm just starting last year's Giller winner The Bishop's Man and so far the first ten pages are great!


message 317: by Petra (new)

Petra I'm reading a book I recently won in a Goodreads Giveaway. It's Three Seconds. I'm only about 40 pages in and it looks like it's going to be a suspenseful, detailed thriller.


message 318: by Dorothy (new)

Dorothy  (Vilette) | 248 comments Petra wrote: "I'm reading a book I recently won in a Goodreads Giveaway. It's Three Seconds. I'm only about 40 pages in and it looks like it's going to be a suspenseful, detailed thriller."

I'm listening to The Winter Vault by Anne Michaels on CD. So far I'm not enjoying it very much. Have any of you read it ?


message 319: by Roberta (new)

Roberta | 193 comments I have it on a list, having really enjoyed Fugitive Pieces. What's your take Dot? I'm curious about why it's not grabgbing you.


message 320: by Dorothy (new)

Dorothy  (Vilette) | 248 comments I'm not sure if it is just that I don't like the voice reading it. There are long sections explaining civil engineering and botany that are just long lists of things and I find those parts rather boring...which surprises me as I usually like to learn about fields in which I know little in a novel. Maybe if I was reading the book I could just skip bits that don't move the story along.


message 321: by Roberta (new)

Roberta | 193 comments Like listening to Thomas hardy on tape. And voice is very important, I agree.


message 322: by Petra (new)

Petra Oh dear....I like Thomas Hardy. :-)


message 323: by [deleted user] (new)

Just finished "George -Etienne Cartier - A Biography by Alastair Sweeny (1976). He, of course, was the PM of the Canadian colony consisting of Upper and Lower Canada before confederation. The author was trying to give English as well as French Canadians a better appreciation of his role in confederation and the development of the country. It was well done, but could be confusing in parts if you are not Canadian. I wrote a review (really a summary) of the book if you are interested.

Currently reading two books "The Fifties" by David Halberstam which covers the major political and cultural events in USA in the 1950's. He has won the Pulitzer Prize. Also reading "The Last Chance" by Jean-Paul Sartre, the incomplete 4th novel of his "Roads of Freedom" series. Enjoyed the first three novels which are written in the time of the Spanish Civil War, Munich, Defeat of France in WWII and the last one taking place in a prison camp. The themes are related to Sartrean ideas about existentialism which are easier to digest in his novels than his philosophy books.


message 324: by Roberta (new)

Roberta | 193 comments Petra wrote: "Oh dear....I like Thomas Hardy. :-)"

I like him tremendously but can't imagine listening to the repition on tape. Course I'm terrible without an actual book in my hands.


message 325: by Petra (new)

Petra Roberta wrote: "Petra wrote: "Oh dear....I like Thomas Hardy. :-)"

I like him tremendously but can't imagine listening to the repition on tape. Course I'm terrible without an actual book in my hands."


Good point, Roberta! I only listen to audio books during my commute. They can't be books where I have to concentrate or ponder; just lighter, fluffier books. I listened to the entire Twilight series (don't know if I oculd have sat and read all that teenage whiney-ness) and they were perfect for commuting with.


message 326: by Roberta (new)

Roberta | 193 comments Noticing that I need to edit my entries. I've been ruined by spell check as unreliable as it can be.


message 327: by Dorothy (last edited Dec 03, 2010 08:41PM) (new)

Dorothy  (Vilette) | 248 comments I'm making an "Advent Resolution" (yes I know it is not Lent)....but I have to stop putting books on hold at the library every time someone recommends something. Yesterday I picked up 2 paperbacks and 2 books on audio from the hold shelf at the library which means I have to set aside all the books I have currently listed on my "currently reading" list. And then people are bound to give me books for Christmas ( at least I hope they do) which means I'll be even further behind. What a dilemma :-)


message 328: by Roberta (new)

Roberta | 193 comments I have a new method. When I see or hear about something I want to read, I look it up on Amazon.ca and put it in my shopping cart. Then I can reserve books as time allows. Sometimes i buy them.


message 329: by Dorothy (new)

Dorothy  (Vilette) | 248 comments I had to leave my previous comment int the middle when the doorbell rang and am only just getting back to it..so it has been edited a little. Yes...I admit...I am a book junkie. I once ran out of books to read and I never want that to happen again...so I own a great many books that I have not yet read. But there are worse things to be addicted to....and it is not as expensive as owning a boat or playing golf...so I think we can cut ourselves some slack here.


message 330: by John (new)

John | 259 comments Mod
Just startedReturn to the Hundred Acre Wood - how can you not love Winnie-the Pooh!


message 331: by Dorothy (new)

Dorothy  (Vilette) | 248 comments How wonderful. Which Pooh character do you see yourself as?


message 332: by Roberta (new)

Roberta | 193 comments I've known a few Eyore's and they can be lovable. Tigger's can be tiring but also vey entertaining. And Pooh - well you just have to love Pooh. I'm not any of those characters though so hmmmm. Maybe I'll have to be Christopher Robin.

I have a serious book habit as well. And, like Glen I mark them up, underline bits that move me, write scathing margin comments and gentler ones to bring me back to something I enjoyed or want to remember. But with mysteries and other books that I read quickly , I don't need to do that, so I am trying to wean myself off buying those books.

I remember when getting a book to own was such a delight. One of my first and favorites was Black Beauty. Like all 8 year olds I was horse crazy. I also remember the Readers Digest Condensed novels my grandparents had, which led to a bad habit of reading books far beyond my comprehension level. And then, I got my first job at 14 as a page in the Lethbridge Public Library. I think I am fated.

Dot I have Howards End is on the Landing: A year of reading from home[ on its way and will be happy to share it with you. I know the fear of being without reading material. Qu'elle horreur!


message 333: by Roberta (last edited Dec 04, 2010 07:22PM) (new)

Roberta | 193 comments Oh I forgot. I wanted to comment on listening skills. Everyone has the ability to listen to other human beings but, like any skill, it must be practiced. I work with myself and with the teams I help on deep listening - the listening that goes beyone practicing your next response, finding a similar story or developing a solution to wehatever the person is telling you. It's just being there and opening up to the listening. - soooo difficult sometimes. It is different though from listening to a book on tape. I'm just not able to do that. Not sure why.


message 334: by Dorothy (new)

Dorothy  (Vilette) | 248 comments The "Howard's End" book sounds great....I hope to borrow it from you next year.


message 335: by Dorothy (new)

Dorothy  (Vilette) | 248 comments Roberta wrote: "Oh I forgot. I wanted to comment on listening skills. Everyone has the ability to listen to other human beings but, like any skill, it must be practiced. I work with myself and with the teams I ..."

It really depends on the quality of the reader. Sometimes there is more than one voice and then it sounds something like a radio play. That is when I like it best...takes me back to the days before TV.


message 336: by Dorothy (new)

Dorothy  (Vilette) | 248 comments Roberta wrote: "I've known a few Eyore's and they can be lovable. Tigger's can be tiring but also vey entertaining. And Pooh - well you just have to love Pooh. I'm not any of those characters though so hmmmm. M..."

I'd like to to think I am Kanga but I'm definitely not Tigger these days ;-)


message 337: by John (new)

John | 259 comments Mod
I think I am probably a Christopher Robin too.


message 338: by Roberta (last edited Dec 09, 2010 05:30PM) (new)

Roberta | 193 comments I'm reading Power and Love: A Theory and Practice of Social Change by Adam Kahane. I liked Solving Tough Problems: An Open Way of Talking, Listening, and Creating New Realitiesand this is his further thought in the same area.

Also reading The Last Child, which I believe you receommended John. Only 3 pages in so haven't formed an opinion.

Just finished The Mistress Of Nothing by Kate Pullinger. Very interesting view of Egypt from two different perspectives - mistress and maid. I was also struck by how a liberal and enlightened person could still be bound by class bias and fail to see servants as fully human.


message 339: by John (new)

John | 259 comments Mod
Roberta wrote: "I'm reading Power and Love: A Theory and Practice of Social Change by Adam Kahane. I liked [book:Solving Tough Problems: An Open Way of Talking, Listening, and Creating New Realitie..."

You must be thinking of a different John. I looked up the book and have no recollection of it. Mind you these days I carry i.d. so I don't forget my name!


message 340: by Dorothy (new)

Dorothy  (Vilette) | 248 comments I'm really enjoying Fall of Giants by Ken Follett which is the first in a trilogy about the 20th century. It begins with a mining accident in a small Welsh Village where life is a stark contrast to that of the landowner and his family. The action then moves to London where Society women mingle with Cabinet Ministers and diplomats from foreign embassies during "The Season". It is a long time since I studied the Balkan crisis in history at school so it has been good to read about it from this perspective.


message 341: by Roberta (new)

Roberta | 193 comments His books are always well researched and well witten. I'll add this trilogy to the list.


message 342: by John (new)

John | 259 comments Mod
Starting my second Tim Winton book Riders. I hope it is as good as Breath was.


message 343: by John (new)

John | 259 comments Mod
Just startedThe Lost Generation: The brilliant but tragic lives of rising British F1 stars Roger Williamson, Tony Brise and Tom Pryce, the story of three drivers who died before they reached their potential.


message 344: by Roberta (last edited Dec 24, 2010 12:36PM) (new)

Roberta | 193 comments Just put aside Travels in Siberia as too detailed and not enough characterization (time was I couldn't have done that). Am now enjoying A Place Within, by MG Vassanji. Some of what he says reminds me of first visiting Ireland.


message 345: by Dorothy (new)

Dorothy  (Vilette) | 248 comments Roberta wrote: "Just put aside Travels in Siberia as too detailed and not enough characterization (time was I couldn't have done that). Am now enjoying A Place Within, by MG Vassanji..."

I've just started The City of Falling Angels by John Berendt which has been on my 'to read' shelf for ages. I'm enjoying it so far.


message 346: by Roberta (new)

Roberta | 193 comments I love that book. He is an excellent writer. Still enjoying the Vassanji book and wishing I had gone to India years ago when I had more stamina. Sounds like a fascinating and exhausting place - an assault on all senses.


message 347: by Dorothy (new)

Dorothy  (Vilette) | 248 comments Santa Claus was very good to me in the book department. I'll list them all as marked "to read". My dtr in law went through my recommendations on Goodreads and chose books for me by authors to whom I had given 5 stars! What a great idea from a very thoughtful woman :-)


message 348: by Petra (new)

Petra Happy Holidays, Everyone! We had a nice, relaxing time.

I started reading War and Peace and have just finished Part 1. So far, I'm really enjoying it. I think Tolstoy introduced the characters nicely and logically and set the wheels in motion for character development and intrigue.
Another group I'm a part of is reading this as a Group Read and since it's been on my TBR list for many years I took it as a "sign" to finally read it.

I've also started Tempest-tost, which is quite humerous. Robertson Davies is a fun author.


message 349: by Roberta (new)

Roberta | 193 comments And Happy Holidays back to you and your family.

I'm embarrassed to admit that Inever finished War and Peaceand that I continue to tell myself that I will. It's not that I didn't like the 3/4 of the book I read, it's just that life intervened.

I need to reread Davies one of these days. I enjoyed all his books.


message 350: by Dorothy (new)

Dorothy  (Vilette) | 248 comments I finished up "City of Falling Angels" and decided to follow it with a Donna Leon mystery from my tbr shelf. I suspect this will be my last book for 2010 and I can start 2011 with the new books I got as gifts :-)


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