Readers and Reading discussion

note: This topic has been closed to new comments.
80 views
Monthly "READS" > December reads

Comments Showing 1-41 of 41 (41 new)    post a comment »
dateDown arrow    newest »

JoAnn/QuAppelle | 1608 comments Mod
List your December reads here, please. It would be nice to see a short comment on each book if you care to make one


message 2: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) Here is what I read in December.
You can click on the book jacket for more info.

Les Misérables by Victor Hugo Les Miserable - Victor Hugo Fiction
4 GR stars
A big honking 1200 page classic. It was great fun to read.

In CHEAP We Trust The Story of a Misunderstood American Virtue by Lauren Weber In Cheap We Trust - The story of a misunderstood American virtue- Lauren Weber
non fiction 4 GR stars
A history from Ben Franklin to today on the history of frugality.

Lady with the Little Dog and Other Stories, 1896-1904 (Penguin Classics) by Anton Pavlovich Chekhov The Lady with the Little Dog- Anton Chekov
fiction 2 GR stars
Short story I read for the Teaching Company DVD.

Eating Animals by Jonathan Safran Foer Eating Animals- Jonathan Safran Foer
non fiction 3 GR stars
A look into factory farming and being a vegetarian .

A Christmas Memory by Truman Capote A Christmas Memory- Truman Copote
Fiction- 4 GR stars
I re read this book for my f2f book club. Beautifully written short story.

Jane Goodall Legendary Primatologist (Signature Lives) by Brenda Haugen Jane Goodall Signature Lives series Brenda Haugen
non fiction 3 GR stars
Informative YA book on the legendary primatologist famous for her work with chimpanzees.
First of two books I read about her this month.
Jane Goodall - GR link about the Goodall.

The Way People Live - Life in the Hitler Youth (The Way People Live) by Jennifer Keeley Life in the Hitler Youth- The Way People Live series
non fiction 2 GR stars
YA book. Interesting, though at times a bit repetitive.

The Italian Renaissance (Cultures of the Past) by Virginia Schomp The Italian Renaissance- Virginia Schomp
non fiction 3 GR stars
YA book. I read two books on the italian Renaissance this month in preparation for a DVD from the Teaching Co on the subject that I plan to view once it comes in for me at the library.

Jane Goodall (Up Close) by Sudipta Bardhan-Quallen Jane Goodall - Sudimpta Barham Quallen
non fiction 3 GR stars
This is the second YA book on Goodall I read this month. I was intrigued by her after seeing her on numerous TV shows promoting her new book, Hope for Animals and Their World How Endangered Species Are Being Rescued from the Brink

The Italian Renaissance (World History Library) by Paul Robert Walker The Italian Renaissance- Paul Robert Walker
non fiction 3 GR stars
YA book on the Italian Renaissance. The second book I read on the topic this month.

No Ordinary Time Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt The Home Front in World War II by Doris Kearns Goodwin No Ordinary Time: Franklin and Eleanor the Home front in WWII- Doris Kearns Goodwin
non fiction - Still reading.
I just started this book and am enjoying it a lot. It deals with the Great Depression, WWII and FDR. Goodwin won a Pulitzer prize for the book.


message 3: by Mary (new)

Mary | 25 comments During December I read Christmas books. I would like to read some of the books suggested on this thread.


JoAnn/QuAppelle | 1608 comments Mod
Mary wrote: "During December I read Christmas books. "

I read some too, but they were disappointing.....too light, if you know what I mean.

Mary, your profile says "I am in three book groups at my local Barnes & Noble. They are Women's Book Group, VUES and Mystery"

What is VUES?


message 5: by Mary (new)

Mary | 25 comments VUES is Vestal Union-Endicott Schools. Lots of non-teachers and people who wrote in the community who aren't associated with schools are part of this group.


message 6: by Mary (new)

Mary | 25 comments I have read Body Surfing by Anita Shreve for the Women's Book Group earlier this month. Other books I have read, besides Christmas boosk are:
Falling in Love by Pauline Trent
204 Rosewood Lane by Debbie Macomber
The Help by Kathryn Stockett
A Gate At The Stairs by Lorrie Moore
Desinger Markoff by Ellen Byerrum
Dream of Me by Fern Michaels
Ford County by John Grisham
Holiday Grind by Cleo Coyle

I enjoyed A Gate At The Stairs very much. It was typical of the nanny stories. Very moving and deep.


message 7: by Mary (new)

Mary | 25 comments Also Clubbed to Death by Elaine Viets


message 8: by Schmerguls (new)

Schmerguls | 257 comments 4647 Empire of Liberty A History of the Early Republic, 1789-1815, by Gordon S. Wood (read 6 Dec 2009) This is a just published volume in the series The Oxford History of the United States, and is the sixth volume in that series I have read. This volume covers from the adoption of the Constitution till the end of the War of 1812. There is a lot of analytic history but I did not find the volume too absorbing, though there are a lot of good chapters. I especially liked the chapter on the War on 1812--a strange war indeed, which we were very lucky to have gotten out of by the Treaty of Ghent--which treaty gave us a draw, and which the battle of New Orleans (fought after the treaty was signed) made Americans think they had won the war. This is a big book: 738 pages of text, and a bibliographic essay of 23 pages. The footnotes are real footnotes--at the foot of each page. Lots of insightful discussion, even if not super-absorbing.

4648 Harvey Comedy in Three Acts, by Mary Chase (read 6 Dec 2009) (Pulitzer Drama prize in 1945) This is only the fourth Pulitzer prize-winning play I have read. I have seen the play performed, most notably when my daughter had a role in it at college. It is uproariously funny. But reading it is less humorous. It definitely is to be seen and heard, not merely read. Harvey is an invisible rabbit, six feet tall, called a pooka--an Irish fairy. Mary Chase, born and died in Denver, is famous because of the play.

4649 Nothing To Fear FDR's Inner Circle and the Hundred Days That Created Modern America, by Adam Cohen (read 9 Dec 2009) This is a 2009 book which I started reading with low expectations, figuring it plowed familiar ground: the 100 days in 1933. But it got better and better. Cohen tells the story thru five figures of the time: Raymond Moley, Lewis Douglas, Frances Perkins, Henry Wallace, and Harry Hopkins. He gives an overview of the life of each before 1933, the role of each in the 100 days, and then what happened to each after the 100 days. The book shows well the excitement of the 100 days, how hard people worked, and that the country welcomed the action-filled time which turned despair to hope. A very good book, much better than I thought it would be.

4650 A Gathering of Old Men, by Ernest J. Gaines (read 10 Dec 2009) This is the fourth book I have read by Gaines. I was rather impressed by the others and was quite caught up by this book, laid in Louisiana. a white man is shot and a dozen or so old black men gathered and each says he shot him. The white sheriff is exasperated that they won't tell the truth, and the novel is quite gripping. But towards the end there is a lot of shooting and I thought the story disintegrated. Though the conversation is all Southern Negro talk the story is easy to follow. I just thought the denouement was not very instructive.

4651 The Coldest Winter America and the Korean War, by David Halberstam (read 15 Dec 2009) This is the fifth book by Halberstam I have read and it is the last one he wrote. Five days after he finished it he died in a car accident. This is a big book and some parts of it are super-interesting. There are some detailed battle accounts, based on interviews of people who were in the battles. These battle accounts are good but often one cannot get totally interested. I appreciated more his accounts of the events leading up to the war and his accounts of the generals and their foibles. He shows MacArthur in a most bad light, except for his role in selecting the Inchon landing--MacArthur's last victory. The drive to the Yalu was the height of bad generaling, and his favorite commander in Korea, Ted Almond, is devastatingly portrayed in the book. The account of the firing of MacArthur and his return is very well done. I recall with pride those days and feel I was right in defending Truman, as history shows he was right. In the final chapter Halberstam gets into talking about Vietnam and says some things I did not appreciate, but huge chunks of the 502-page book were very good, riveting, and attention-holding--even though Halberstam's style is popularizing rather than documentary.




message 9: by Schmerguls (new)

Schmerguls | 257 comments 4652 The Story of My Life, by Helen Keller with supplementary accounts by Anne Sullivan, her teacher, and John Albert Macy The Restored Classic 1903-2003 Edited with a new foreword and afterword by Roger Shattuck with Dorothy Herrmann (read 18 Dec 2009) I first heard of this book when I was in grade school and older siblings read it. Helen Keller was born June 27, 1880, in Tuscumbia. Ala., and at 19 months became blind and deaf. In 1887 Anne Sullivan became her teacher and taught her to read, write, and talk. Pretty amazing story, though much of the extra material in this book--lots of letters by her--(which I thought boring and of limited interest) and some words by Anne Sullivan and the guy who married Anne were of some interest. The book in 1996 was listed as one of he 100 most important books of the 20th century by the New York Times so I thought I should read it. Much of the book was of interest and I'm glad I read it.

4653 Let the Great World Spin A Novel, by Colum McCann (read 21 Dec 2009) (National Book Award fiction prize in 2009) When I first heard of this book I was at once struck by the title which comes from the seventh last verse of Tennyson's masterly poem, Locksley Hall (a poem I have known by heart for over 50 years). Philippe Petit on Aug 7, 1974, walked on a cable he strung between the twin towers of the World Trade Center, and that feat is a major event in this novel. Some of the characters were objectionable--the mother and daughter prostitutes, and the Jesuit who succumbed to a woman before he died. But the judge and his wife and Gloria, a friend of his wife, were well-drawn and interesting characters and as I neared the end of the book my appreciation of it soared and I ended up feeling it was a good book. Some of the scenes from the dregs of New York City were painful to read about, but the story eventually caught me up. It is the 50th National Book Award fiction prize winner I have read.

4654 My Germany A Jewish Writer Returns to the World His Parents Escaped, by Lev Raphael (read 23 Dec 2009) This is a 2009 account by a son of Holocaust survivors. He kind of tells the story of his parents, who spent time in Nazi concentration camps, lived in Belgium for five years after the war, and then came to New York where the author was born 19 May 1954. His parents were not observant Jews , and the author tells how at age 30 he had his Bar Mitzvah, and even got circumcised at age 50. He tells of his sex life--lots of fornication and then becoming homosexual--which added nothing to the book. He tells of his travels in Germany, and how he came to be at peace with today's Germany. The book is easy reading, mildly interesting, and not very significant as far as I can see.

4655 The Battle of Britain The Greatest Air Battle of World War II, by Richard Hough and Denis Richards (read 26 Dec 2009) This is a 1989 book,loaded with names and accounts of individuals having victories and defeats. The official Battle of Britain was from July 10 to Oct 31, 1940 and this book slogs through it day by day--the forest thoroughly obscured by the trees. Reference to what the leaders on each side said and did is interesting but most of he book is apparently designed for those who were in the battle or knew somebody who was. So the book often was non-attention-holding. All that personal data obscured the high drama of the battle--seems to me it was a close run thing and if Hitler had not been so intent on fighting Russia he might well have succeeded in an invasion. But the people in Britain were saved by some heroic and hard-working people in and supporting the RAF.

4656 Declassified 50 Top-Secret Documents That Changed History, by Thomas B. Allen (read 27 Dec 2009) This is a somewhat non-pretentious 2008 book which lists 50 documents that changed history. The author spends two or three pages on each document--enough to get one interested but far too little to get the drama of some of the things discussed. The documents are from various times, but most pertain to the 20th century. But there is an entry on the letter written to Mary Queen of Scots (which doomed her) and the note which was used to condemn Dreyfus, etc. These are things I have read whole books on. The author wrote for years for the National Geographic and his pages are that type of prose. Most of the documents are of interest, but the book is so abbreviated that one could not get caught up too much in the book.

There will be another e-mail this month listing the 15 best books I read this year--a list which I know all of you await with bated breath. Happy New Year.



message 10: by Sandi (new)

Sandi (sandin954) | 211 comments X-posted at M/T Reading Friends.

Happy New Year!!!

Here are my December reads:

Top Reads

Company of Liars by Karen Maitland
Company of Liars
Karen Maitland
Historical Suspense. The Black Plague has overtaken England and a small group of travelers decide to band together for safety. Very compelling reading, loved the characters, the setting, and the historical details.

Advise and Consent by Allen Drury
Advise and Consent
Allen Drury
Pulitzer Prize winning political novel.

Good Reads

Borderlands by Brian McGilloway
Borderlands
Brian McGilloway
Debut book featuring an Irish Garda detective who lives and works by the border of Northern Ireland.

Cat Chaser by Elmore Leonard
Cat Chaser
Elmore Leonard
Standard Leonard fare set in Florida. So far, I prefer the novels set in Detroit but this one was not bad. Audio read by Frank Muller.

Murder Against the Grain
Emma Lathen
Wall Street banker John Putnam Thatcher has to return to sleuthing after his bank is taken for $ 985,000 during a commerical paper transaction that involves the first shipments of wheat from the USA to the Soviet Union. Another well written and witty entry in this series.

Dog Eats Dog by Iain Levison
Dog Eats Dog
Iain Levison
Fast, dark, & comic read about a bank robber and a college professor.

Tip on a Dead Crab
William Murray
Debut horse racing mystery that focuses on the bettors who are always on the look out for the sure thing.

Things the Grandchildren Should Know by Mark Oliver Everett
Things the Grandchildren Should Know
Mark Oliver Everett
Memoir of the lead singer of the Eels (remember the song Novocaine for the Soul).

Mean Town Blues A Novel of Crime by Sam Reaves
Mean Town Blues A Novel of Crime
Sam Reaves
Another Chicago crime novel by Reaves. Lots of action and plot but the characters were a bit thin.

Mind Prey (Lucas Davenport, #7) by John Sandford
Mind Prey
John Sandford
Another entertaining entry in the Lucas Davenport series. Audio read by Richard Ferrone.

The Four Last Things (The Roth Trilogy, #1) by Andrew Taylor
The Four Last Things
Andrew Taylor
First published book in the Roth Trilogy (though the third chronologically). A female Anglican curate and her policeman husband are rocked by the kidnapping of their daughter. Lots of church politics and theology.

The Property of a Lady
Anthony Oliver
Second in a series that revolves around antiques but is in no way cozy but rather darkly humorous.

Night Frost (Inspector Frost, #3) by R.D. Wingfield
Night Frost
R.D. Wingfield
The Denton police force is decimated by the flu and only Inspector Frost is around to combat the crime wave.

Disappointing

Quiet, Please Dispatches From A Public Librarian by Scott Douglas
Quiet, Please Dispatches From A Public Librarian
Scott Douglas
Boring and tedious look at working in a library. Never did connect with the author's style.


message 11: by JoAnn/QuAppelle (new)

JoAnn/QuAppelle | 1608 comments Mod
Schmerguls, I started Let the Great World Spin last night. I got to page 21 and have not yet put it aside, which is a good sign!


message 12: by JoAnn/QuAppelle (new)

JoAnn/QuAppelle | 1608 comments Mod
Nothing outstanding for me this month except for the last book in this list

Among the Mad by Jacqueline Winspear. 3 stars.
I listened to the audio. The story was just so-so. Too long. I think I have read too much Maisie Dobbs in less than a year.

City of Bones by Michael Connelly. 4 stars
I was delighted to find an old Harry Bosch book that I had not yet read. This one was very good, compelling, but I did find that the victim was identified too conveniently and easily - the very first missing boy who was investigated! Otherwise, it was excellent with several unexpected twists and turns.

No Mercy by John Gilstrap. 3 stars

Like Nancy Martin, I first "met" John Gilstrap on the AOL message boards and loved all of his books, especially Nathan's Run, which I recommended to so many people.

I just finished No Mercy and wish I could recommend it too. But poor editing and a story full of holes has left me scratching my head and so disappointed. I expected better of John. This was a riveting and fast-paced story, but there were so many errors and omissions that the book was spoiled for me. Twenty hours of good editing could have tightened up the book and eliminated the holes.

I know that publishing money is tight, but I bet John could find five or ten faithful readers who would read his manuscript and make suggestions.

A Homemade Life by Molly Wizenberg 3 stars
I like her blog, Orangette, better.

Confections of a Closet Master Baker by Gesine Bullock-Prado 4 stars

I enjoyed most of this book. I do think she could have stopped referring to her unhappiness with Hollywood after, say, the fourth time.

I like reading books about food establishments and how they are started and run. This was no exception as far as that goes...I fully appreciated all of the hard work that Gesine put into her confectionary and continues to put into it every day. She sure is no slacker! She described the setup and the daily routine so well.

I wish the recipes had been less complex, and more suited to an average home cook. I see a recipe that is 3-4 pages long and know, for sure, that it is not for me.

Yes, the author is Sandra Bullock's sister.

The Little Prince Pop-Up by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry 5 HUGE stars!!!!!

I cannot stop raving about the sheer gorgeousness of this wonderful book, a favorite of mine for at least 40 years. This pop-up book is so cleverly and beautifully done, with little panels to open as well as the pop-ups themselves. Even if I had had to pay the full price for it, it would have been worth it....I am actually surprised that the full price was only $35 as the detailing is so extensive.

This book will be treasured ---and read and re-read.


message 13: by Shirley (new)

Shirley | 42 comments I love the way Sandi posts the book covers and links--quite impressive and helpful. I appreciate all of the lists though that include info about the books.

In December, I listened to two books and read three traditional books:
Audio--
Stockett, Kathryn-The Help—read by Octavia Spencer, Bahnia Turpin, and Jenna Lamia. Finished 12/7/09. Fiction; audio; rating 10. Excellent portrayal of the lives of black domestics in Jackson, Mississippi told from their perspective as if written by white 22-year-old Skeeter. One of the maids, Aibileen, is especially helpful in seeing that the book is written in spite of the risks the women take in telling their stories even though they are given anonymity. The story actually has a happy ending.
Perry, Anne—A Christmas Visitor—read by Terrence Hardiman. Finished 12/18/09. Fiction; audio; rating 6. A family in England copes not only with the death of a family member, but that the estate they live on may have been purchased based on a forged title which caused the unjust imprisonment of the estate’s rightful owner.

Traditional books:
Wizenberg, Molly—A Homemade Life—Stories and recipes from my kitchen table from the creator of Orangette (blog). Finished 12/12/09. Non-fiction; rating 10. Delightful book with recipes and stories of the author’s love of good food as well as her family life including the death of her beloved father (I was reading that while waiting for my flat tire to be repaired at Noller’s on 12/10/09 and started crying) as well as her dating, engagement, and marriage to Brandon. I copied some of the recipes and plan to try the banana bread, French toast (we've made this once and plan to do so again), and pink cookies.
Macomber, Debbie—The Perfect Christmas. Finished 12/18/09. Fiction; rating 8. A feel good read pleasant for this time of the year. After receiving a Christmas letter and photo from her friend about the friend’s perfect husband and perfect children, 33-year-old Cassie Beaumont easily is persuaded by her friend Angie to try a $30,000 matchmaker. She falls in love with the matchmaker.
Roose, Kevin—The Unlikely Disciple—A Sinner’s Semester at America’s Holiest University. Finished 12/31/09. Non-fiction; rating 10. Rather than going abroad for a semester in a different culture, Brown University student Roose decides to learn more about the evangelical Christians by attending Jerry Falwell’s Liberty College. He had expected to find the self-righteous extremism to be an uncomfortable experience, but was surprised at the genuine people he met during his semester and their acceptance even after they learned that he was not the transfer student that he had indicated he was. He wound up being the last person who did an in-depth print interview of Falwell before his death.




message 14: by JoAnn/QuAppelle (new)

JoAnn/QuAppelle | 1608 comments Mod
Shirley, you and I seem to have a lot of books/reading in common!

Do you read the Orangette blog? I am sorry that she is not updating it very much any more but know that the restaurant is keeping her busier than she ever thought. I do love reading about how restaurants got started and how they work. I just got Eric Ripert's new book, On the Line , which details the start and operation of La Bernardin


message 15: by Shirley (new)

Shirley | 42 comments I haven't read the Orangette blog, but it sounded interesting. There seem to be more blogs available of interest than I am wanting to spend time reading.

We tried the French toast using baugette and liked it so plan to try it again with a different type of bread.



message 16: by JoAnn/QuAppelle (new)

JoAnn/QuAppelle | 1608 comments Mod
Shirley wrote: "I haven't read the Orangette blog, but it sounded interesting. There seem to be more blogs available of interest than I am wanting to spend time reading.

We tried the French toast using baugette and liked it so plan to try it again with a different type of bread..."


Ina Garten makes a good French toast using challah bread. We loved it.








Carolyn (in SC) C234D | 123 comments JoAnn/QuAppelle wrote: "List your December reads here, please. It would be nice to see a short comment on each book if you care to make one"

My December reads:

Duty: A Man, His Son, and the Man Who Won the War, by Bob Greene. The author, a well-known newspaper columnist from Chicago, goes home when his father is slowly dying, and learns much about his dad's earlier life, particularly his WWII service. He meets Gen. Paul Tibbets, who led the team and flew the Enola Gay, the plane which dropped the bomb on Hiroshima. Full of fascinating stories and also sensitivity related to his father's dying.

Maisie Dobbs, by Jacqueline Winspear. I've wanted to read this for a long time, and finally got a copy. It's a very interesting story of a young girl in England from roughly 1910 to 1930, about her experiences as a housemaid, a college student, a nurse near the battlefield, and the beginning of her private investigation agency.

Barabbas, by Par Lagerqvist. An excellent short parable about Barabbas, a spiritually tormented man who never seemed to get over being released when Jesus was crucified. So well written, it was hard to put the book down.


A Redbird Christmas, by Fannie Flagg. I almost forgot about this, as I neglected to record it in my reader's journal. A light, feel-good story, not as funny as some of Fannie Flagg's work, just a story about an ill man from Chicago who comes to a southern small town because he cannot tolerate the northern winter any longer. Too good to be true, but a pleasant read at a very busy time of the year.


message 18: by Schmerguls (new)

Schmerguls | 257 comments JoAnn/QuAppelle wrote: "Schmerguls, I started Let the Great World Spin last night. I got to page 21 and have not yet put it aside, which is a good sign!"

JoAnn, I thought it got better as it progressed . There was a while when I did not like it, but it ended up making it onto my list of best fiction read in 2009. I hope you enjoyed it.




message 19: by JoAnn/QuAppelle (new)

JoAnn/QuAppelle | 1608 comments Mod
Schmerguls wrote: "JoAnn/QuAppelle wrote: "Schmerguls, I started Let the Great World Spin last night. I got to page 21 and have not yet put it aside, which is a good sign!"

JoAnn, I thought it got better as it progressed . There was a while when I did not like it, but it ended up making it onto my list of best fiction read in 2009. I hope you enjoyed..."


I started this book two nights ago, read 3 pages the next day (not a good sign) and last night hunkered down and finished the story of Corrigan. Sorta. I skimmed some of it. I found the writing too dense and showy yet the characters were not developed. If an author is going to write so many words (and some of the writing seemed very contrived), why doesn't he at least give some motivations, some inner thoughts of the characters'? I realize that the short story form is very difficult and I do not think this author had a grasp on it, at least in this one story. So it will go back to the library, unfinished. Sigh. My first abandoned book of the new year




message 20: by madrano (new)

madrano | 444 comments JoAnn/QuAppelle wrote: "Ina Garten makes a good French toast using challah bread. We loved it."

Is this the French Toast casserole, JoAnn? I was set to make it (with eggnog instead of cream/milk) for Christmas morning, having purchased all the ingredients. Then THEN THEN i read the instructions & saw it took much longer than the time i'd alloted since one of our guests had to leave early. SO, i used the challah to make eggnog French toast the regular way. Delicious. I won't be going back to the ole stand-by of using Texas Toast for it again. Yum!

deborah




message 21: by JoAnn/QuAppelle (new)

JoAnn/QuAppelle | 1608 comments Mod
madrano wrote: "JoAnn/QuAppelle wrote: "Ina Garten makes a good French toast using challah bread. We loved it."

Is this the French Toast casserole, JoAnn? I was set to make it (with eggnog instead of cream/milk..."


No, this was just French Toast. Soaked then fried.

I always wanted to make Creme Brulee French Toast that I saw posted online once.....



message 22: by madrano (new)

madrano | 444 comments Ooooo! That sounds delicious.

deborah


message 23: by Meredith (new)

Meredith | 54 comments My December reads were not very satisfying.
tt
I Dreamed I Married Perry Mason Susan Kandal The title is what got me to read it. After Nancy Drew books, I cut my mystery teeth on the Perry Mason books. It was an okay mystery.

Died in the Wool Mary Kruger This was also just an okay mystery. It is the first in the series. However, it is not a series that I will continue reading.

Started in December and still reading China Trade by S. J. Rozen. This is the first in a series. I am really enjoying this book so am sure that I will continue with the series.

Meredith


message 24: by JoAnn/QuAppelle (new)

JoAnn/QuAppelle | 1608 comments Mod
Meredith wrote: "My December reads were not very satisfying.."

I just hate months like that. Nothing memorable, wasted time, frustrating.

Meredith, do you stop reading a book if it is not to your liking/unsatisfying?




message 25: by madrano (new)

madrano | 444 comments Meredith, i read the first 4 Kandal mysteries. What i like is that i learn a bit about the classic mystery author she's highlighting. However, after the last one i asked myself why i didn't just read a bio about them instead. Duh! The series is too much about vintage fashion for my interests.

deborah


message 26: by Sandi (new)

Sandi (sandin954) | 211 comments >>Started in December and still reading China Trade by S. J. Rozen. This is the first in a series. I am really enjoying this book so am sure that I will continue with the series.<<

Love the Bill/Lydia series by S.J. Rozan. The series gets better and better with each book and since Rozan alternates the first person POV between Bill and Lydia in each book it never seems to get stale.


message 27: by Meredith (new)

Meredith | 54 comments JoAnn/QuAppelle wrote: "Meredith wrote: "My December reads were not very satisfying.."

I just hate months like that. Nothing memorable, wasted time, frustrating.

Meredith, do you stop reading a book if it is not to you..."


I will stop reading a book if by page 50 or so, I do not care about the characters or plot. In both the books in december there were at least one thing that intrigued me to continue. However, I would never continue to read book just because I had started it.

Meredith




message 28: by Meredith (new)

Meredith | 54 comments madrano wrote: "Meredith, i read the first 4 Kandal mysteries. What i like is that i learn a bit about the classic mystery author she's highlighting. However, after the last one i asked myself why i didn't just re..."

Deborah,

I agree it was interesting learning about Erle Stanley Gardner but I could care less about the vintage fashion

Meredith




message 29: by JoAnn/QuAppelle (new)

JoAnn/QuAppelle | 1608 comments Mod
Meredith wrote: "I will stop reading a book if by page 50 or so, I do not care about the characters or plot. In both the books in december there were at least one thing that intrigued me to continue. However, I would never continue to read book just because I had started it."

AMEN!



message 30: by Reeves (new)

Reeves Honey | 142 comments 1. A friend made the creme brulee french toast casserole a few years back for our New Years Day hang around the house event. It was very good.
2. I watched that new show,The Book Group,2 episodes on Ovation. I thought it was dreadful. The American girl was such a b--tch! The humor was low brow in my humble opinion.

On Saturday I watch all season 1 of Durham County on ION Tv. Then watched the 2 hour season 2 premere on Sunday 9 to 10. VERY,VERY DARK SHOW. Like a more easily understood Twin peaks. But really makes Canada seem grim! Anyway I am hooked.


message 31: by JoAnn/QuAppelle (new)

JoAnn/QuAppelle | 1608 comments Mod
Guess I like low-brow, LOL

I thought Claire (the American girl) was a sad sack too.


message 32: by madrano (new)

madrano | 444 comments Hmm...i knew nothing about "Durham County." These new-ish cable networks have some interesting programs. I'll trust ya'll to point out the winners. LOL!

I agree about Claire. At first i was fed up with her. Now i'm thinking that there will end up being more to her than the eye-rolling woman we first met. I hope so or i will probably lose patience with the entire show.

deborah


message 33: by JoAnn/QuAppelle (new)

JoAnn/QuAppelle | 1608 comments Mod
I did think it was funny when she was wailing about not having had sex for so long, not realizing there was someone in her bathroom. eeek!


message 34: by madrano (new)

madrano | 444 comments Yes, that was so funny. It was odd to see her start the behavior, as i didn't think the rejection deserved that. But the payoff was well worth it. LOL!


message 35: by Reeves (new)

Reeves Honey | 142 comments JoAnn/QuAppelle wrote: "Guess I like low-brow, LOL

I thought Claire (the American girl) was a sad sack too."

I knew I recognized the Claire person on Book Club. She plays January Jones' housewify friend on Mad Men. So it seemed strange that she was playing a person I got the impression was much younger on the BC show.




message 36: by Michael (new)

Michael Canoeist (michaelcanoeist) Dom Casmurro Written by a Brazilian author in the 1890s, this book reads as though it could have been written last year. Other than for some of its historical and cultural aspects, of course. It is witty, delightful, and short. Machado de Assis turns out to have been one of Brazil's greatest writers. Boy and girl-next-door want to get married; not everything works out, and there is some pessimism involved as their lives continue. The reader is addressed directly throughout, which adds to the pleasure, and makes for some interesting reflections on the characters and the story. There is no "magical realism" in this book. The Gledson translation is the best; there is another that seems stilted, from the excerpt I saw.


message 37: by madrano (new)

madrano | 444 comments R, thanks for sharing. I knew i recognized the actress but didn't zero in on where. Now i know.

deborah


message 38: by madrano (new)

madrano | 444 comments Michael wrote: "Dom Casmurro Written by a Brazilian author in the 1890s, DEB SNIPPED The reader is addressed directly throughout, which adds to the pleasure, and makes for some interesting reflections on the characters and the story.

The first time i saw an author do this was Charlotte Bronte in Jane Eyre "Reader, I married him." I was in rhapsody to "hear" Bronte's character acknowledge i've been reading her life story. Ever since, i have liked the technique.

deborah


message 39: by RNOCEAN (new)

RNOCEAN | 93 comments R. wrote: "1. A friend made the creme brulee french toast casserole a few years back for our New Years Day hang around the house event. It was very good.
2. I watched that new show,The Book Group,2 episodes ..."


I liked The Book Group with it's different type of humor. I love British humor so to me this is also funny. As far as Durham County, I am hooked on that show as well. The actress, Michelle Forbes, played a very dark character on "True Blood" as well. On Durham County she is just as evil and cunning.


message 40: by Reeves (new)

Reeves Honey | 142 comments

I too am hooked on Durham County. Thank heavens for the DVR as Joann just wrote me that a new Cranford is on PBS tomorrow night at the same time............



message 41: by madrano (new)

madrano | 444 comments Thanks for the info on Durham County. We well remember Michelle Forbes from "Star Trek: The Next Generation" years ago. And she was effective in "Homicide", too, as the coroner.

deborah


back to top
This topic has been frozen by the moderator. No new comments can be posted.