On Chesil Beach On Chesil Beach discussion


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randomness or the way we intend things to go

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message 1: by Joan (last edited Aug 25, 2016 11:59AM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Joan Abrams I feel in McEwan's books that the question arises---"Is life history determined by random acts?" of do end the way that we intended to end? In this book, a detailed derailment of the wedding night is shown where he is too ardent and she is too reticent. They end in life alone and each wonders if life would have been different if they treated each other with just a little more understanding. Or indeed is what happened what each really wanted to happen.


message 2: by carrie (last edited Aug 25, 2016 01:02PM) (new) - rated it 3 stars

carrie That's a good observation. Although I have to say at the end of this novel I felt slighted, and I felt that the characters were slighted. I wanted more. I know that they were sketched well, and I believed in them, but at the same time, that dissolution happened so quickly.


Ivana I underlined the sentence at the end of the novel(sometimes I do it when I like a quote): ''This is how the entire course of a life can be changed -by doing nothing.''
Beautifully written. And so true....


Kristine Ivana wrote: "I underlined the sentence at the end of the novel(sometimes I do it when I like a quote): ''This is how the entire course of a life can be changed -by doing nothing.''
Beautifully written. And..."

I agree. I read the book when it was first published and yet when you wrote that line, I remember just how moved I was when I read it for the first time.


Ivana Kristine wrote: "Ivana wrote: "I underlined the sentence at the end of the novel(sometimes I do it when I like a quote): ''This is how the entire course of a life can be changed -by doing nothing.''
Beautifully..."


Me too. I also think that randomness of fate is frequently addressed in his work....
Like in Amsterdam.....Even more in Atonement...


Tiddimuelli got a question :) do you think that florence has actually been abused by her father?? i#m wondering about that because i'm writing a "facharbeit" about this book and it is quite important for the plot. so i need some opinions :))


Gosia Tiddimuelli wrote: "got a question :) do you think that florence has actually been abused by her father?? i#m wondering about that because i'm writing a "facharbeit" about this book and it is quite important for the p..."

I personally think so. It was implied in at least two different places - when she was remembering being sick on the boat and when she had a feeling of being disgusted by her father (and yet acting with tenderness towards him) and feeling disturbed by it herself - without understanding why. Plus, of course, her obvious issues with physical aspects of relationships also suggest some serious trauma.


Nora aka Diva Tiddimuelli wrote: "got a question :) do you think that florence has actually been abused by her father?? i#m wondering about that because i'm writing a "facharbeit" about this book and it is quite important for the p..."

I thought so.
It was implied in the book, plus Florence's deep issues with physical contact support that theory. I would say most likely.


message 9: by Hilary (last edited Aug 02, 2012 12:47PM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Hilary West A study in frigidity and premature ejaculation. I didn't really feel it was much more than that. They were two characters, both of whom were terribly unsuited to marriage, though Edward less so. There was a lot of angst in this book. Too heavy for many I should think! Was the ending fate or personal responsibility? I think their characters were their fate.


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