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The Count of Monte Cristo
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Past Group Reads > The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexander Dumas (LIV-LXXXI)

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Jamie  (jaymers8413) | 738 comments Mod
This is for the discussion of The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexander Dumas (LIV-LXXXI).


message 2: by Jamie (last edited May 26, 2015 05:40PM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Jamie  (jaymers8413) | 738 comments Mod
From reading so many Victorian novels I find it odd how much the characters speak to each other about money and personal problems. Has anyone else had this feeling? Is it just the social/cultural difference between the English and French?


Nicole Galloway-Miller (nrgalloway24) | 3 comments You might not agree, but I thought the money in the dialogue had to do with the theme of the story. Money seems tied to fate, plus the Count is only able to accomplish his revenge and rewards because of the treasure. It is money that propels the plot forward. Plus, Danglers is a banker, so his whole life evolves around money. Also, money determines worth in the novel. The count is nothing in jail with no money and then can participate in the higher echelon society once he has the treasure.

As for other books, I don't think money is a cultural issue, however, I think we all know rich people who flaunt and brag about their money. A lot of the characters were this kind of person, so that makes sense to me.


Jamie  (jaymers8413) | 738 comments Mod
Nicole wrote: "You might not agree, but I thought the money in the dialogue had to do with the theme of the story. Money seems tied to fate, plus the Count is only able to accomplish his revenge and rewards becau..."

I totally agree. I just find it unusual for the characters to openly talk about money troubles. I expect characters to talk about other people money but not their own so openly. I do see your point with Danglers being a banker though. A lot of the money conversation involves him.


Nicole Galloway-Miller (nrgalloway24) | 3 comments Jamie wrote: "Nicole wrote: "The one thing that struck me was the crazy declarations of love and the sometimes exaggerated reactions of the characters.

I was really disappointed that he did not end up with Mer..."


I hope my spoiler alert message is okay. Thanks for pointing it out.


Nicole Galloway-Miller (nrgalloway24) | 3 comments Most of the books I have read do not really discuss money in great detail. Personally, I get uncomfortable discussing money itself, too. I have asperger's syndrome, a form of autism, and when I was learning how to have conversations, my mom told me never to discuss money, politics or religion. However the the second two are often discussed a lot in novels, especially ones from this time period. I think they make great fodder for conflict in fiction. People are generally really passionate about these issues and take it personally.

In this book, I do not think any of the characters delved into politics or religion much. Another thing about all the money talk is that it gave the novel a cohesiveness and worked with the theme. Dumas skillfully writes these details without slowing the pace of the novel. I could not put the book down, and read the entire thing in two days.


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