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Mia Kerick
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Author of the Month > May 2015 AotM - Mia Kerick

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message 1: by Kaje (new)

Kaje Harper | 16566 comments This year, rather than talking about one book a month, we're choosing an author each month whose works we want to discuss.

You can read a new book by the author, or just comment on what you've already read by them. If you want to discuss a major plot point in a book, please put it into <*spoiler> tags so it is hidden from view. (If you don't know how to do this, PM me.)

You can discuss one book, or several, or the author's work in general. Hopefully, we'll help each other find authors and books to enjoy.

This month we will discuss the books of Mia Kerick Mia Kerick

Mia is the author of several YA LGBT books, with a range of main characters and themes.

Us Three - What if Nate, Zander, and Casey fall in love each with the other and all three together? Not only gay but also a threesome, for them high school becomes infinitely more complicated and maybe even dangerous. To survive and keep their love alive, they must find their individual strengths and courage and stand together, honest and united.

Come To My Window - this book gives us love story between two girls, as it also touches on issues of body image and parental physical and emotional abuse.

The Red Sheet - an imaginative transformation of a teen boy in pursuit of his true self.

Inclination - As a high school junior, Anthony has finally come to accept his sexual orientation, but he struggles to determine if a gay man can live as a faithful Christian.

Intervention - two young men falling in love, dealing with the long shadow cast by past sexual abuse.

And more. Lots of reading choices, and hopefully some good discussion of them here.


message 2: by C. (new)

C. Kennedy | 184 comments Congratulations, Mia!


message 3: by Mia (last edited May 06, 2015 08:13AM) (new)

Mia Kerick | 76 comments Thank you everybody for voting for me and thanks, Cody, for the congrats! I am looking forward to the conversation. I wonder sometimes, with regard to a work of YA fiction, what matters more to readers--the story itself, in terms of how gripping and entertaining it is, or what the story says to teens? (I know we, as authors, are going for both of these things, but some stories with "important" subject matter just don't have much public appeal.) I have tried to deal with some topics that I would have wanted to read about as a teen, which is why my books focus on the redemptive and empowering aspects of love, bullying, the potential for personal change, gay Christianity, gender confusion (Love Spell- my June 1st release), body acceptance, and life priorities, sometimes in terms of sexuality. Many of these were hot topics to me as a teen. But then one of my books was accused of being a moral packaged as a story. I'd really love to hear your thoughts on this topic.


message 4: by Mia (new)

Mia Kerick | 76 comments I had a response to my question on Facebook and I am copy/pasting the exchange between Mandy and I here because she was unsure of how to do the GR thing- I can relate.

Mandy: I read your post but not sure where to make a comment other then here. Still haven't worked out how to navigate through good reads. Although I haven't had time to read all your work, 3 really stand out because they almost mirror my own experiences. Inclination , intervention and come to my window. The most powerful thing you have written, to me, is your own reasons for telling these stories. I know your next book is going to also touch me. Being brought up in a very strict religion and from a very early age knowing I was so different. Yes I'm married, and have children but I've never wanted to be female. Your stories really put into words things I've never been able to say.
Like · Reply · 25 mins

Mia Kerick: This is exactly the type of thing I want to discuss, Mandy. I think, for example, Inclination was a worthy topic as it deals with a subject that is so divisive and so currently relevant, and clearly reached you, however, when I requested reviews (like from Amazon Top reviewers) many reviewers responded that they didn't want to read about religion. Which is their right, totally. And as I search for bloggers to review Love Spell, I notice that many book bloggers say in their criteria no Christian or religious themes. Is it okay if I copy and paste this exchange to the Goodreads YA LGBT books page where the discussion is getting started?


message 5: by Michael (new)

Michael Thompson | 3 comments Mia congratulations! I would have been more surprised if you hadn't be selected. You have given so much to the LGBT community and deserve so much more praise. I hope our choice in selecting you as our author of the month will serve as validation that you bring us joy, comfort, love,acceptance, and above all else, self-worth and importance in this world.
Thanks you Mia, and congratulations!

Keep writing just the way you always have.

FROM YOUR HEART!


message 6: by Mel (new)

Mel (melleach) Mia wrote: "I had a response to my question on Facebook and I am copy/pasting the exchange between Mandy and I here because she was unsure of how to do the GR thing- I can relate.

Mandy: I read your post but ..."


Sure, Mia. This is a great way to get the conversation going. We would love to have Mandy join the group if she is interested and would like to continue the conversation. Please thank her for her contribution.


message 7: by Mandy (new)

Mandy Ryder (jamesons68) | 1 comments Hey. A glass of whiskey and some determination and I'm here!!! Whether I can keep up with it is another thing.

Following on from what I said earlier- Mia has a simple way of telling complicated stories, I really feel that every book I have read by you, you have lived the feelings you write about. I have always found it hard to vocalise my feelings and am so refreshed that you do it so well on my behalf. Intervention will always be my favourite simply because of the music but Inclination.... Oh boy where do I start. Every single feeling, thought process and experience Anthony went through, so have I. And I'm sure any others have.


message 8: by Mia (new)

Mia Kerick | 76 comments I guess people are not really so fundamentally different from one another, even if their sexuality, gender, or even racial and religious (etc.) identities are different. As young adults, all of us struggle with insecurity and fear and setting priorities and self-acceptance. We all feel love and hatred and bitterness and jealousy and compassion to some degree. So, expressing what you might have gone through, or are going through, as a teen isn't really so different from what I went through and still go through. Mandy, it feels so good to hear that the topics, even ones that are not fun and glamorous but may seem more obscure, have touched and moved you because they ring true to you. And Michael, this is truly a validation of my worth as a writer; it shows me that going into areas that are not often touched upon in YA literature--like gender identity, religious crisis, body image, abuse issues, and more-- are valuable endeavors.
Mel- I am so glad that Mandy is here even if it required a beverage to fortify her LOL!!


message 9: by Mia (last edited May 06, 2015 01:13PM) (new)

Mia Kerick | 76 comments Mia wrote: "I had a response to my question on Facebook and I am copy/pasting the exchange between Mandy and I here because she was unsure of how to do the GR thing- I can relate.

Mandy: I read your post but ..."


i replied to you, Michael, in the big paragraph!!!


message 10: by J.S. (new)

J.S. Frankel | 105 comments First off, Mia, congrats on your selection. Question: have you ever felt intimidated by the subject matter or the possible reaction from, shall we say, more conservative elements in society? I say this as I'm a straight guy who has written some YA lesfic and I've been told that I shouldn't even be writing that in the first place. What are your thoughts?


message 11: by Rez (new)

Rez Delnava (rez_delnava) | 586 comments I have a question about the cover selection for The Red Sheet. On one edition, the cover image was slightly provocative (the blonde guy posed on red satin sheets) and contrasting the content of the book.

My question is, who is he, and where I can get his number?

Just kidding.

Was the provocative image selection intentional, a publisher decision, or? And what spurred the change to the more thematic cover (with the superhero motif)?

While I prefer the cover with the blonde guy, I know some libraries (including the one I work for) won't shelve YA titles with even remotely sexualized cover images. Was that a consideration for the cover change?


message 12: by Mia (last edited May 06, 2015 06:43PM) (new)

Mia Kerick | 76 comments Jesse- It is interesting, but I have very rarely been targeted by society's more conservative members. I have a few reviews that say something like, this was a great book, but because it was about two boys I have to give it one star. And I will not say that society's potential disapproval isn't a consideration when I write novels about LGBTQ people, but I guess I am truly a believer that love is love, and if I shy away from writing these stories, I am doing such a disservice to the people who live these stories. I also had some reservations about writing with criticism about Christian tradition, and I will admit it was difficult to find reviewers, especially Christian reviewers, of the book. I was raised to fear and respect my church and I think my automatic reaction of caution had a lot to do with that. But then I ask myself what it must be like to be a young LGBTQ person, or even adult, who loves God with devotion, yet can't possibly please Him in this regard according to common interpretation of the Bible. So, again, the story had to be written. We are free to write what and for whom we choose and we must write the story in our hearts.


message 13: by Mia (last edited May 06, 2015 06:45PM) (new)

Mia Kerick | 76 comments Rez- I wondered when someone was going to directly ask me this question (I thought it would have happened sooner), and I appreciate that you asked it with such tact. I will say this- I love that first cover, but in hind sight, it is not a great example of the kind of YA book cover that I feel comfortable with. And it didn't fit the book. In fact, nobody in the book ever lay seductively on a bed covered in red sheets--not even once! The publisher and the cover designer offered me freedom with my cover art tastes, and they gave me essentially what I originally asked for in this enticing cover, especially since I actually had this particular model in my mind when I wrote the story. But then, after publication, I thought better of it. The book was doing very well, winning awards and going places, and I knew that the sexually enticing cover was not appropriate for the plot or for the message of The Red Sheet. I requested a cover change and the publisher worked with me quickly and pleasantly, without even a word of questioning, which I appreciate. I guess it became obvious that the sexier cover actually limited where this book could go, and so we changed it.


message 14: by Rez (last edited May 07, 2015 03:28AM) (new)

Rez Delnava (rez_delnava) | 586 comments Thanks for the answer, Mia! It sounds like you have a really great group of people that you're publishing with; I've heard horror stories about covers being forced by the publisher, so I'm really glad both covers are your choice.

And now that you said you had the model in mind while writing... I would love to know who the model is and what work he's done previously that brought him to your attention. He is really cute.


message 15: by Mia (new)

Mia Kerick | 76 comments He is DJ Skinner's model named "MJ". He is on lots of book covers. The cover picture on The Red Sheet was from when he was young and very blond, and he has changed through the years but he is of course still very handsome.


message 16: by Kaje (new)

Kaje Harper | 16566 comments Dan Skinner's pics are stunning - he has a young couple he features that have the sweetest warmest expressions, and MJ is very inspiring :)


message 17: by Mia (last edited May 07, 2015 02:55PM) (new)

Mia Kerick | 76 comments I saw MJ's pictures and wrote The Red Sheet with his face in my mind. I find his face very inspiring, too, Kaje. But I guess this brings me to another question that I would love to hear opinions on. How much sex, if any, is too much sex for a YA work? This is not a question meant just in regard to LGBTQ novels (although some people have less tolerance to LGBTQ expressions of love in fiction as well as in real life, considering LGBTQ sex somehow more risqué than non-LGBTQ sex, which makes no sense at all to me) but for all YA works of fiction. Should there be any sex, in your opinion? Should it be descriptive? Should there be a purpose required that if it is somehow necessary to the plot it can be included in the story? Where do you draw the line, if in fact, you draw a line at all? And why? I'd love to hear many opinions on this. Teens have sex. How do we as writers handle that in our novels? Tell your friends we are discussing this topic.


message 18: by Mia (new)

Mia Kerick | 76 comments I would also love to know how people feel about profanity in YA novels. I think we can all agree that teens curse. If we are reflecting real life in our writing, shouldn't our main characters curse, too? I have been criticized for using too much profanity in my writing, and honestly, I can't remember the last time I used profanity in my everyday life so it is not natural in my thought process. Profanity is something I choose to include. As the mother of three teens and a 20-year-old, I hear this type of language in teen interaction. Do authors have a responsibility to model a better way to be? Or should we reflect what is? Love to know what you think.


message 19: by Kaje (last edited May 07, 2015 03:06PM) (new)

Kaje Harper | 16566 comments Mia wrote: "I saw MJ's pictures and wrote The Red Sheet with his face in my mind. I find his face very inspiring, too, Kaje.But I guess this brings me to another question that I would love to hear opinions on. How much sex, if any, is too much sex for a YA work?..."

OMG we have two threads where we have discussed this, with over a hundred posts in each. I might advise not opening the topic here... up to you though. If you want to see the (long, unresolvable) discussion, this is one of them : Explicit content in YA books - how much is TMI? https://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/...


message 20: by Kaje (last edited May 07, 2015 03:14PM) (new)

Kaje Harper | 16566 comments Mia wrote: "I would also love to know how people feel about profanity in YA novels. I think we can all agree that teens curse. If we are reflecting real life in our writing, shouldn't our main characters curse..."

Now that's another slightly less fraught question - in the US I don't think you can write realistic contemporary older American teens with no profanity from any characters. I think if realism is your goal then there will be strong language in the book. I'm not a proponent of "show them a better way" in fiction. If teens don't relate to the MCs because they seem fake, they will not read or take to heart the content of the story. In fantasy, or historical, etc, then yeah, you don't have to bring in the cursing. I do try to ease the profanity back a little from what I hear from local teens (if only because my f**king ration for any book has to be less than every other adjective), but you will see my MCs using it.

I do, however, admire anyone who can say, "He cursed loudly and turned to Jack..." consistently, without putting the actual curse words on the page, and make it real. More power to them.


message 21: by DJ (new)

DJ (storywrtr) | 12 comments I agree. I hang out with teens constantly and they could make a sailor blush with some of the things I've heard. Most contemporary fiction I've read (American) has at least one curse or it just doesn't feel real.


message 22: by Lynn (new)

Lynn S. | 1 comments My criteria for LGBT YA books for PFLAG is no gratuitous sex and no explicit sex. I also took out a book that referenced "toys" because I have a young group.


message 23: by Mia (last edited May 07, 2015 07:54PM) (new)

Mia Kerick | 76 comments With regard to sex in YA literature, I guess if it happens in YA life, it is fair game for material in novels, particularly contemporary romance. However, I remember reading somewhere (sorry, can't remember where) that sexual intimacy in YA novels should come with realistic consequences. Real good consequences and real bad ones... I have tried to be judicious with the sexual contact included in my YA books, be it a kiss or intimate touching. My intention in including it at all has been to show the fear, the doubt, the thrill, and the bonding that a character undergoes when experiencing an intimate moment, rather than to just include it to excite the reader. I have never had a complaint in terms of there being too much intimacy in my YA novels; I have read many remarks that there could be more sex in my YA works. But I will not throw in sexual contact where I don't feel it is necessary to the story or to the portrayal of my character.

However to try to pretend that YAs have no sexual awareness and that they do not experience curiosity about the subject is truly burying one's head in the sand. Some teens are having sex, others are not, but many teens want to read about characters their own age who are faced with this decision, as well as to see how the characters deal with intimacy at this time in their lives. I guess for me, it is the author's motivation for including sex in a novels for Young Adults (who are mostly not adults at all) that really matters. Is this a critical part of the story? Is it important that we know how the character made this decision and how he/she handled the reality of the situation after the sexual act? Were the consequences to becoming sexually active realistic? Just my two cents on that topic.

And Lynn, I will say in reference to "toys" in YA fiction, I do not see the need for that. My purpose in including any sexual intimacy at all in a YA story is not to describe the detailed nature of the intimacy, but to offer the human elements of a teen's experience with intimacy.


message 24: by Mia (new)

Mia Kerick | 76 comments I wrote a long post about profanity, but I lost it somehow. I will come back and redo it.


message 25: by Mia (new)

Mia Kerick | 76 comments OK. My view on profanity, take 2. Kaje- I agree that avoiding all profanity would be like avoiding a certain reality that exists for many Young Adults. And DJ, I spend a great deal of time around teens too, and profanity is par for the course. Not just "bad" kids curse; many "good" kids curse. And no, not all kids curse. But to write a book where nobody used the F-word in contemporary YA literature would be, for me, very difficult.

I have been called on my use of profanity by many reviewers, though. I did a tour with a blog service I had never used before where almost every one of the reviewers loved The Red Sheet, but before their recommendation of it, they warned their reading audiences of my excessive use of profanity. I write characters in first person, so between their personal thoughts and their dialogue, let me tell you, the F-words add up!

Cursing, for the most part, is not part of my inner mental dialogue nor is it part of my spoken language. So I choose profanity for some of my characters. I purposefully include it in many cases. If it goes on in my character's heads, it will come out on the page. However, I ask myself, will my use of profanity prevent The Red Sheet from being a discussion group book at a public school? Should I even care about this consideration? Will The Red Sheet never be in a YA Library because of too many F-words? Should I taper down the use of curses to please the adults who choose the books for school and public YA libraries?

What do you think?


message 26: by J.S. (new)

J.S. Frankel | 105 comments Mia, with regards to profanity, I agree that teens do swear a lot. (I swore a lot as a younger man and still do when angry :) )

Having said that, I think that swearing should be used judiciously and not gratuitously. If there's an emotional/dramatic scene, I can see the characters letting loose with a few 's' or 'f' bombs. However, using it every other sentence would, for me, become mind numbing after a while. In the past as now, I do use the s-word once or twice, but not always.

As well, certain publishers will have their writers take out those words and replace them with another phrase.

With regards to sex, yeah, if it's part of the plot, why not? I do agree, though, that if sex is central to the development of the charcter(s) in one way or another, then the consequences of it should be made clear. Just my take on all this.


message 27: by Mia (last edited May 07, 2015 08:34PM) (new)

Mia Kerick | 76 comments I preached. Ooops... notice I didn't use profanity here, but many of my YA characters would have LOL


message 28: by Mia (new)

Mia Kerick | 76 comments Jesse- Everybody here appreciates your viewpoint! I am so grateful to hear your perception that constant swearing becomes mind-numbing in literature. I know that for certain, I will keep that point in mind. Maybe a few well-placed F-bombs say more than a thousand randomly scattered F-bombs! (well placed F-bombs--an interesting concept!!)


message 29: by Rez (new)

Rez Delnava (rez_delnava) | 586 comments I know from my experience in high school, being the 'innocent' (yeah, right... /snark) kid with almost no cursing to my vernacular, that a well placed F-bomb (or in my case, a well structured string of pointed curses) has an impact. Enough to silence a large group of people, cause my best friend to come running, and audible gasps from people who knew me.


message 30: by Mia (new)

Mia Kerick | 76 comments So maybe less is more with regard to the use of profanity in YA lit!!


message 31: by Julia (new)

Julia Ember (jules_chronicle) | 42 comments Awesome! Us Three has been on my list to get to for a while now. Definitely interested to read a Polyamorous YA book, as I don't think I've ever seen one before.


message 32: by Kaje (new)

Kaje Harper | 16566 comments Julia wrote: "Awesome! Us Three has been on my list to get to for a while now. Definitely interested to read a Polyamorous YA book, as I don't think I've ever seen one before."

I agree - I love seeing books that give us the wider LGBTQIAP rainbow.


message 33: by Mel (new)

Mel (melleach) Julia wrote: "Awesome! Us Three has been on my list to get to for a while now. Definitely interested to read a Polyamorous YA book, as I don't think I've ever seen one before."

Us Three is an amazing book. It's not my usual fare but Mia did a wonderful job. She crafted very unique characters from very different walks of life and it just worked beautifully. I truly loved this story.


message 34: by Mia (new)

Mia Kerick | 76 comments I have some ideas for further exploring the rainbow, and I have had requests, in particular for a book about an asexual teen. All teens need to be able to find themselves in books. it is a comfort and a validation.


message 35: by J.S. (new)

J.S. Frankel | 105 comments Excellent point, Mia. I think all teens have a need for validation. Searching for the right way is never easy, and choices one makes seem to take on a greater importance in the teen years as opposed to the adult years or so we think at the time. Books can help in some small way to find that validation.


message 36: by Mia (new)

Mia Kerick | 76 comments Love Spell, my new YA Contemporary Romance, releases from CoolDudes Publishing on June 1st. I loved writing Chance César, the main character, because he was in many ways different from any characters I have read in YA. He is gender fluid but he really doesn't like to discuss his gender identity, as it is so confusing to him that it troubles him. Chance would have liked to read a book like Love Spell- I think it would have helped him a lot to know he wasn't alone in his gender confusion! I also think that we have to write books with LGBTQ characters that ALL kids are going to want to read. It will open the eyes of teens to all different kinds of kids!


message 37: by Kaje (new)

Kaje Harper | 16566 comments Mia wrote: "Love Spell, my new YA Contemporary Romance, releases from CoolDudes Publishing on June 1st. I loved writing Chance César, the main character, because he was in many ways different from any characte..."

Congrats on the upcoming release - looking forward to it. (I know someone who is reading an ARC and enjoying it BTW.)


message 38: by Mia (new)

Mia Kerick | 76 comments That is good news, Kaje. My only concern about Love Spell's performance on Goodreads is that it has been called "true YA lit" and sometimes that seems too young for readers of my adult books. I write in YA and Adult and I choose to use my same name for both. Sometimes I wonder if it is confusing to readers who are looking for adult material in one of my YA books. On the other hand, YAs who read my books may get more than they expect in my Adult novels. However, most of my Adult novels are what you could call New Adult, I think, so they have an appeal to a younger audience.


message 39: by Mia (new)

Mia Kerick | 76 comments What do you all think of an author having the same name for YA and Adult novels? I am Mia Kerick for both and I often wish I knew how readers felt about this.


message 40: by Rez (new)

Rez Delnava (rez_delnava) | 586 comments It depends…
Having the same name can help drive sales from reader loyalty, but on the other hand can damage the reader-author relationship if the reader picks up a book from the other genre/age group and doesn't like the content. The second is especially true if the genres and writing style between the two is vastly different; e.g. Nora Roberts vs. J.D. Robb.

My thoughts would be to use First/Middle initials for publishing in YA and younger where the gender anonymity is an advantage, then use full name for adult novels.


message 41: by Mel (new)

Mel (melleach) Mia wrote: "What do you all think of an author having the same name for YA and Adult novels? I am Mia Kerick for both and I often wish I knew how readers felt about this."

You know, Mia, I always wondered about the different pen names for YA versus adult works. It just never made sense to me, but our friend Timmy gave me the most salient reason for it and it completely changed my mind. He said that parents don't always have the time to read books before their kids do and it gives the parents a little peace of mind if the author has a YA pen name. They don't have to worry about their child picking up an adult work by mistake. The different pen names give the parents a measure of confidence that the material will be age appropriate for their child.


message 42: by Kaje (new)

Kaje Harper | 16566 comments I use a different pen name for YA than adult. I think it helps readers know what they are going to get from me. I don't try to keep them separate (although authors who want to do school visits and interact with teens may need to keep the two identities hermetically sealed, because writing erotic romance and being allowed as a role model in schools doesn't work.) But I do think it's courtesy to my YA readers (and adult romance readers) to let them know when they will get a full-on sex scene, and when they won't.


message 43: by Mia (new)

Mia Kerick | 76 comments Rez, Mel, and Kaje- These are fantastic answers and give me something to think about, especially in terms of parental input to the books kids read. I think I stuck with the Mia Kerick name because I had developed reader loyalty, but also because I knew that even my adult novels are more New Adult and are not extremely spicy in the bedroom, with a few exceptions. I also thought that my narrator's voice sounds quite young in general, even when writing adult and New Adult works. I plan on continuing to write mainly YA in the future. Maybe my best bet would be to create an adult pen name, maybe a version of Mia Kerick, for the rare adult works I will write and keep Mia Kerick for my YA to make best use of my reader loyalty. Great answers and much appreciated.


message 44: by Mel (new)

Mel (melleach) Mia wrote: "Rez, Mel, and Kaje- These are fantastic answers and give me something to think about, especially in terms of parental input to the books kids read. I think I stuck with the Mia Kerick name because ..."

I think that's a great approach, Mia. You do have quite a YA following already so it makes sense to keep the Mia Kerick brand on that.


message 45: by Kaje (new)

Kaje Harper | 16566 comments I think that's probably a good plan.

If you write something that is definitely erotic (that a YA or their parent might find out of their comfort zone), you might want a related but distinct pen name. Like "Anna-Mia Kerick" or something, clearly related but an indicator of adult content.


message 46: by Mia (new)

Mia Kerick | 76 comments Good ideas, and this is another insight I have taken from this discussion that I am thankful for!


message 47: by Mia (new)

Mia Kerick | 76 comments I had an awesome time as YA LGBT Author of the Month!! Thank you all for the comments and insights and questions!!!


message 48: by Kaje (new)

Kaje Harper | 16566 comments Mia wrote: "I had an awesome time as YA LGBT Author of the Month!! Thank you all for the comments and insights and questions!!!"

Thanks for all the time you spent hanging out with us :)


message 49: by J.S. (new)

J.S. Frankel | 105 comments Even though Mia's time is almost up--metaphorically speaking--the question about name changes depending on genres is an interesting one. I've always used my initials as my pen name--J.S. Frankel--as opposed to my real name (which is on this forum) as I never liked my name to begin with. I'm not trying to hide anything. It's just what I prefer. And I've been pretty open with what I've written--mainly straight YA but recently lesfic YA and an adult-themed F/F novel due out this December. I just never saw any reason to change it.

I can understand authors who write, say, YA books or non-fiction using a different pen name if they wrote something erotic and wouldn't want young kids exposed to that. However, the Internet being what it is, if anyone were so inclinded, they could probably figure out who the real person is.

Anyway, it was great reading your thoughts, Mia, and congratulations on the release of Love Spell!


message 50: by Mia (new)

Mia Kerick | 76 comments Thanks Jesse. I loves talking to everybody. There is still so much more to say. And thank you - I am very excited about Love Spell- we need more gender fluid stories for YA.


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