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Archived Author Help > Smashwords Vs. KDP

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message 1: by J.D. (new)

J.D. Dudycha | 39 comments I wanted to get peoples opinion on which ebook platform they prefer to use?


message 2: by Riley, Viking Extraordinaire (last edited May 05, 2015 10:03AM) (new)

Riley Amos Westbrook (sonshinegreene) | 1510 comments Mod
Same, I use both. But if you're asking select vs smashwords, then I'd say it depends.
If you're going to write more than one book, I'd say put it on smashwords as a free price, then contact Amazon customer service to have them price match it.Your other books can be limited to select if you prefer, but this gives you a perma free option to introduce readers to your writing. (Then again, it can back fire as some readers will NEVER read a free book.)
But if you're only going to write one book, or have written more books, I'd say put them on Select.
That's just an opinion and an observation from trends I've noticed, and my own personal philosophy added in. I will say, having my first book free on Smashwords did help generate a bit of buzz when it was first released.


message 3: by Ken (new)

Ken Doggett (kendoggett) I use both also, and Lulu for hardcovers.


message 4: by G.G. (new)

G.G. (ggatcheson) | 2491 comments I use both too. While I sell less on SW (That's counting ITunes, B&N etc) than Amazon, since my books are 99 cents only, I get about the same royalties from one sale there than two sales on Amazon. Also, you can do as many sales as you wish with the coupon codes. You can give books to reviewers (coupons)without having to pay for the book (Amazon). Some people even do the 'set your price' option for their books.


message 5: by Amanda (new)

Amanda Siegrist (amandasiegrist) | 190 comments I use both as well. I haven't seen a difference yet, but I like to have more options than just one place. I don't read books from Amazon. I get mine from ibooks on my ipad so I figured I want my book out there where I would be able to get it if I wasn't the author.


message 6: by Christina (new)

Christina McMullen (cmcmullen) I'm with Select for all my books at the moment. Every time I start to think about branching out, I get a spike in borrows, so I take it as a sign.
There's also the fact that I'm not keen on giving my banking info out to too many companies at the moment.


message 7: by Courtney (new)

Courtney Wells | 138 comments - taking notes in back of class -


message 8: by Riley, Viking Extraordinaire (new)

Riley Amos Westbrook (sonshinegreene) | 1510 comments Mod
Christina wrote: "I'm with Select for all my books at the moment. Every time I start to think about branching out, I get a spike in borrows, so I take it as a sign.
There's also the fact that I'm not keen on giving..."


They already have it if they want it Christina! The times we live in, everything is for sale >.>


message 9: by Denise (new)

Denise (mariesiduri) My next book, should it ever be finished, will go first to smash words b/c the royalties are higher. I can then submit it to Createspace for a paperback and so on.

Every so often, I have dreams of pursuing the tradition publisher, but then I wake up.


message 10: by Micah (last edited May 05, 2015 02:09PM) (new)

Micah Sisk (micahrsisk) | 1042 comments Rob wrote: "1) I've submitted short stories to an anthology initiative that uses Amazon and Play as only channels. While the contract would allow me to,it basically does not feel right to pollute their channels.
2) Amazon's royalty rates for individual $0.99 short stories is very poor when compared to Smashwords .
"


Hmm.

I don't find either of those arguments very compelling.

1) You've submitted...but not been accepted? Even if they do accept, if the contract allows you to publish the stories on Amazon, then you wouldn't be "polluting their channel" but rather limiting your discoverability by not doing so. You'd be saying, in effect, the only way anyone's going to find my work on Amazon (or Play) is if they get this anthology. You won't even be top billed. By publishing them yourself, you open a new line of discoverability. And, let's face it, that is the #1 problem with self-publication.

2) So Amazon's royalties are lower. So what? By refusing to publish on Amazon, you've agreed to get paid ZERO from Amazon sales. Amazon has something like 65% of the eBook market. So basically you're opting to have your work unavailable for the largest slice of the eBook market.

If you're looking at writing as a business, both of those decisions are counterproductive.

I'd say the question is not "should I publish on Amazon or Smashwords" but rather "should I publish anywhere OTHER than Amazon."

The answer to that will depend on if Amazon Select makes sense for you. I tried it; it didn't work for me. Others have had better luck.

But if you decide not to use Amazon Select then the only other reasonable course is to distribute at Amazon and as many other places as you can. SW distributes to a large number of other sites, so it's definitely a viable option. And they distribute to the other big three: B&N, Kobo, and iTunes.


message 11: by Owen (last edited May 05, 2015 07:38PM) (new)

Owen O'Neill (owen_r_oneill) | 1509 comments We use KDP exclusively. We checked out Smashwords to begin with, but did not like what we encountered there, so we decided to go exclusively with Amazon and KDP Select. That has turned out to be an excellent decision for us.

The main thing is that Amazon appears to have a superior method to get new authors exposure than other outlets. This, in addition to having, ~65% of the eBook market, is big plus for them. Further, the KU program appears to be still growing and gives readers a way to try out new authors at very little cost to them, but paying ~$1.30 to ~1.40 to you. (This is much better than the $0.35 royalty on a $0.99 book -- a price many new authors use to get traction.) Note that you have to agree to be exclusive to KDP to enroll in KU.

However, a lot seems to depend on the genre. What genre are you publishing in?


message 12: by Jenycka (last edited May 05, 2015 07:28PM) (new)

Jenycka Wolfe (jenyckawolfe) | 301 comments I tried one book on KDP, and I really didn't see any difference in the amount of sales from anywhere else. Right now, my sales are about 70% Amazon, 30% Smashwords, so I'm not about to walk away from Smashwords any time soon.

Out of the Smashwords affiliates, I sell well on Barnes and Noble for some reason. I guess B&N readers have a secret lusty side!


message 13: by Owen (last edited May 05, 2015 08:05PM) (new)

Owen O'Neill (owen_r_oneill) | 1509 comments Rob wrote: "Currently only on Smashwords. Two reasons for avoiding Amazon at the moment:"

It's true that 35 cents on a work is not much. But if the outlets reaches many more readers and sells more books, you still come out ahead.

And if you are willing to join select for 3 months, you can see if KU benefits you. KU will pay you ~4x the royalty of a $0.99 work. Consider that compared to the aggregate of revenue across all other markets.

Edit: I don't think I would not recommend to doing this with an existing work: pulling it from different outlets is a pain, and you might have to hassle with KDP a bit over it. And if it doesn't work, then you have to resubmit all that work.

Also, to the extent you have established a presence on an outlet, I believe those tend to be fragile, so experimenting with exclusivity may not be a wise gamble. But with a new work it is essentially risk free. (In case, there is any question, KDP Select applies on to a specific book -- not the author.)


message 14: by Christina (new)

Christina McMullen (cmcmullen) Riley wrote: "Christina wrote: "I'm with Select for all my books at the moment. Every time I start to think about branching out, I get a spike in borrows, so I take it as a sign.
There's also the fact that I'm ..."


Yes, but when it comes to network security, Amazon has a slew of managers working in realtime to keep that side of things running. You might have noticed that when we had that ginormous security breach last year, Amazon was one of the few sites not affected. Paypal on the other hand, has compromised our information on more than one occasion. Luckily, all we had listed with them was a credit card.


message 15: by Sam (new)

Sam Friedman (sam_ramirez) | 83 comments I have yet to publish, but my plan was to creat a MOBI and EPUB format, and put it on Amazon, Kobo, Smashwords, and B&N, so the more places my books are available, the better they may sell. If I am screwing up, please let me know.
Note: I was NOT planning on signing any exclusivity offers with any e-book seller or distributor. I have no objection to having books offered both as solos or in a subscription, at least at this time.


message 16: by Owen (new)

Owen O'Neill (owen_r_oneill) | 1509 comments Samuel wrote: "I have yet to publish, but my plan was to creat a MOBI and EPUB format, and put it on Amazon, Kobo, Smashwords, and B&N, so the more places my books are available, the better they may sell. If I am screwing up, please let me know."

I don't think you're screwing up. There's really no way to tell where new book/author will gain traction, or of they will. There are ways to hedge your bets some, depending on how much research you feel like doing.


message 17: by Owen (new)

Owen O'Neill (owen_r_oneill) | 1509 comments Christina wrote: "Yes, but when it comes to network security, Amazon has a slew of managers working in realtime to keep that side of things running. "

In case it's a factor, among the IT security professionals I've known, Amazon's security is legendary.


message 18: by Christina (new)

Christina McMullen (cmcmullen) Owen wrote: "Christina wrote: "Yes, but when it comes to network security, Amazon has a slew of managers working in realtime to keep that side of things running. "

In case it's a factor, among the IT security ..."


Yep! I'm married to one of 'em.


message 19: by Owen (new)

Owen O'Neill (owen_r_oneill) | 1509 comments Christina wrote: "Yep! I'm married to one of 'em..."

That explains a thing or two...


message 20: by Michelle (last edited May 05, 2015 10:30PM) (new)

Michelle (mdnightmaverick) | 4 comments I'm considering spinning my book out to other sites when my next Kindle Direct Exclusivity decision comes up. Has anyone used Scribd? I have some short stories up there I posted to share with the internet several years ago.


message 21: by Ken (new)

Ken (kendoyle) | 364 comments Michelle wrote: "I'm considering spinning my book out to other sites when my next Kindle Direct Exclusivity decision comes up. Has anyone used Scribd? I have some short stories up there I posted to share with the..."

I use D2D, which distributes to Scribd. No sales there as yet, but I've been out of Select for about a week, so I'm hoping it will be a good move in the long term.


message 22: by Micah (new)

Micah Sisk (micahrsisk) | 1042 comments Owen wrote: "It's true that 35 cents on a work is not much. But if the outlets reaches many more readers and sells more books, you still come out ahead..."

But it's also 35 cents (and more importantly, a reader) that you won't have if your work isn't available on Amazon. There's no risk and no cost to making it available on Amazon, so I still don't think it makes any business sense to ignore the largest market out there.

Building a catalog and a brand is at least as important as the royalty scheme. If you limit your catalog/brand in the largest market for your product, I think you're just hobbling yourself.


message 23: by Owen (new)

Owen O'Neill (owen_r_oneill) | 1509 comments Micah wrote: "But it's also 35 cents (and more importantly, a reader) that you won't have if your work isn't available on Amazon. There's no risk and no cost to making it available on Amazon, so I still don't think it makes any business sense to ignore the largest market out there."

Good point. And the point holds even if one deletes "business". If the goal is have your work read, go where the readers go. A lot of readers go to Amazon.


message 24: by C.M. (new)

C.M. Halstead (cmhalstead) | 46 comments I currently have one short story exclusive to Amazon, using KDP select, and a full novel I am selling everywhere that lets me post it! Other than for security reasons ;) why be selective in the beginning... I'm working on getting my author name out everywhere.

My current plan is to have some short stories exclusively on KDP select, and other short stories elsewhere. This way I can utilize KDPs free giveaways, yet curious readers not utilizing kindle, can have cheap read options as well.

This is my early stages plan, so we will see how it goes! I will continue to put writings out everywhere and anywhere, to help with traction for as long as it takes....


message 25: by Micah (last edited May 06, 2015 08:57AM) (new)

Micah Sisk (micahrsisk) | 1042 comments Rob wrote: "@C.M, I may be misunderstanding something about Amazon here. What is the point of going Amazon exclusive for a short story if you know you can't reasonably charge the € 2.99 minimum for it needed t..."

Kindle Select (the exclusive thing) makes books available for Kindle Unlimited, their subscription program where books are downloaded "for free." Take a look at the details page: https://kdp.amazon.com/select

"Earn your share of the KDP Select Global Fund amount when readers choose and read more than 10% of your book from Kindle Unlimited, or borrow your book from the Kindle Owners’ Lending Library."

Since your short story wouldn't be "sold" to people in the KU program, instead of the normal royalties scheme, you would be paid a share of KDP's Global Fund. Which, for short cheap works, ends up being more than straight up royalties.


message 26: by C.M. (new)

C.M. Halstead (cmhalstead) | 46 comments Rob wrote: "@C.M, I may be misunderstanding something about Amazon here. What is the point of going Amazon exclusive for a short story if you know you can't reasonably charge the € 2.99 minimum for it needed t..."

I love Micah's reply! Well said.

I also want to emphasize the exposure as well. More people will get a "risk free" look at my writing styles and possibly purchase the novels as a result.


message 27: by Micah (last edited May 06, 2015 10:46AM) (new)

Micah Sisk (micahrsisk) | 1042 comments I like numbers.

Assumptions:
2 million people are shopping for an eBook.
65% of them (1.3 million) will only look on Amazon.
35% of them (700,000) will only look elsewhere.
25% of shoppers are interested in my genre.
.01% of interested shoppers (on both Amazon and elsewhere) find and buy my book.
My book is priced at $0.99
Amazon pays 35% royalties.
Elsewhere pays 70% (I don't know what the real average is).

This would result in:
Number of Amazon Sales = 32.5
Number of Non-Amazon Sales = 17.5
Amazon royalties = $11.26
Non-Amazon royalties = $12.13
Total royalties = $23.39
Amazon % of Total = 48%
Non-Amazon % of Total = 52%

Conclusion: If I didn't put my book on Amazon, I would have lost nearly half of my (miniscule) income.

];D

YMMV


message 28: by J.D. (new)

J.D. Dudycha | 39 comments Thank you guys very much for your input. This puts things in perspective for me, I appreciate it.


message 29: by Christina (new)

Christina McMullen (cmcmullen) Owen wrote: "Christina wrote: "Yep! I'm married to one of 'em..."

That explains a thing or two..."


A network security manager, not an Amazon network security manager. All of my pro-Amazon propaganda is my own.


message 30: by Reese (new)

Reese Hogan (reesehogan) | 47 comments I personally had issues with Smashwords reporting my sales, and had a much better experience once I switched to KDP. I use both them and Createspace now. I love how cheap it is to order copies off Createspace. And in regards to the ebook versions, I saw more errors (like question marks in place of letters) in the Smashwords version than the KDP one. I use Nookpress for my BN ebook, and I liked the formatting better on that version than the Smashwords one, as well.


message 31: by Micah (new)

Micah Sisk (micahrsisk) | 1042 comments Rob wrote: "put them into a small anthology. Give the buyer a nice discount by bringing the price down to the $2.99 threshold..."

You're ignoring the fact that you can do both, as you said that it was allowed for you to release it on your own as well. So, yeah, do that! But do the $0.99 release as well. Hopefully you'll get more anthology sales than short story sales alone, but giving the option increases the likelihood that someone will find them. Who knows, they could end up on different Amazon Top 100 lists.

As for where people find books vs where they buy them, I can guarantee you that the vast majority of people with Kindles only buy eBooks on Amazon, even if SW or someone else has MOBI files.


message 32: by Micah (new)

Micah Sisk (micahrsisk) | 1042 comments Also, I have only anecdotal evidence for this, but I do believe that story collections sell worse than short fiction by itself.

If you buy short stories by themselves, you have a choice about what you're getting. When you buy a collection, you're stuck with whatever the editors chose...and that's not always easy to vet as a customer in the eBook market.


message 33: by Erin (new)

Erin Zarro | 95 comments I've got a free anthology on SW currently, but the formatting is giving me fits so I haven't used it for any of my novels. I would like to at some point.

I use Draft 2 Digital to get my book out to non-Kindle retailers. So much easier there.


message 34: by Michelle (new)

Michelle (mdnightmaverick) | 4 comments Ken wrote: I use D2D, which distributes to Scribd. No sales there as yet, but I've been out of Select for about a week, so I'm hoping it will be a good move in the long term.."

Thanks! Looked into Draft2Digital. Seems exactly what I need.


message 35: by J.N. (new)

J.N. Bedout (jndebedout) | 115 comments Micah wrote: "I like numbers.

Assumptions:
2 million people are shopping for an eBook.
65% of them (1.3 million) will only look on Amazon.
35% of them (700,000) will only look elsewhere.
25% of shoppers are int..."


Its always great to see numbers in action. They promote "keepin' it real".


message 36: by Mary (new)

Mary Esseff (esfinc) | 1 comments Thank you all for this stimulating conversation. I really had no idea about going to other distributors. Now, I'm looking into all of them. No one seems to be mentioning Lightning Source. I was going to go there for my hardbacks. Anyone have any experience with them? I just bought my 1st book The Butterfly & the Snail back from Balboa and am going to relaunch it when I launch my 2nd book Wedding Tales, Book One: Love's Journey. I feel the publishing part is the worst part of the whole deal—oh, wait! Maybe the marketing part is the worst part! I'd rather just be writing instead of figuring out the distribution and promotions angles. Mary Sullivan Esseff Thanks again!


message 37: by Nina (new)

Nina | 8 comments Well i am using KPD select, and i had a two day free for some people who asked me, mostly internet friends who asked me to. So i usually have about 4-5 borrows/lends on KU and about 2 buys, everyday. While free the book had over 100 dowloads a day. Reaching 193 downloads the two days. After that though, it was back to normal, so i didnt see much improvement on sales. I havent tested Smashwords in fact i just heard about this just now and going to check it out.


message 38: by Nina (new)

Nina | 8 comments Can someone please inform me how the KPD select royalties are counted please? Cause i havent received any payments yet and i will like to know.


message 39: by Christina (new)

Christina McMullen (cmcmullen) Nina wrote: "Can someone please inform me how the KPD select royalties are counted please? Cause i havent received any payments yet and i will like to know."

You are paid monthly, 60 days after the month ends. So for all sales in May, you will receive your payment at the end of July.


message 40: by Owen (new)

Owen O'Neill (owen_r_oneill) | 1509 comments Nina wrote: "Well i am using KPD select, and i had a two day free for some people who asked me, mostly internet friends who asked me to. So i usually have about 4-5 borrows/lends on KU and about 2 buys, everyda..."

Nina, those are pretty good numbers. Since Amazon has roughly 65% of the eBook market, if you hit all the other markets (Smashwords allows access to most of them), you could expect roughly a sale every other day from all other markets combined -- assuming your ebook sells as well in all other markets as it does on Amazon.

So that is (under those assumptions) what you stand gain: an extra 4 or 5 sales per week.

What you lose is KU. Based on 4-5 borrows per day, that’s ~$44 per week. I don’t know what your books sells for, so I use $4.00 as an example. An extra 5 sales per week equals an extra $14 per week (assuming you get paid 70% royalty in all other markets).

So based on that example (and those assumption), you would expect to lose about $30 per week in revenue by leaving KDP select, or roughly $130 per month.

Putting it another way: to break even, you would have to sell and additional 11 copies per week off Amazon. Since -- based on market share -- the expected value about be 4-5, that means your book would have to be about 3 times more popular (is terms of sales) in other markets than it is on Amazon.

That seems pretty unlikely -- and that is just to break even. You would have to sell more than that off Amazon so be a benefit.


message 41: by Owen (new)

Owen O'Neill (owen_r_oneill) | 1509 comments Rob wrote: "That means that if your book has 100 direct competitors on other channels, it has 150 direct competitors on Amazon. So the probability of a sale being a sale of your book on Amazon would be 2/3th the probability it would be on different channels..."

Rob, there are two problem in this argument, I think:

First, I think you confused "competitors" with customers. Amazon and B&N both carry millions of books and there is a large overlap between those two sets of books. So a book on Amazon doesn't necessarily have more "competitors" than on a book on B&N, since they both offer millions of books. What a book on Amazon has (an eBook) is more potential buyers.

Amazon gets 65% of the customers for these books, so for every 100 book buyers, 65 bought a book on Amazon, and 35 bought it somewhere else. Of course, some of these people shop at Amazon and B&N and even Smashwords, so if you have book in multiple places, you have to take that into account. This is why disturbing your book widely does not increase visibility (or sales) in a simple, linear fashion. And because each of these outlets have different methods of getting books visibility, real visibility is more complicated than we are making it out to be here.

But the more important problem I see is this: books do not compete with other books. Your books don't compete with mine or Rowling's, or anyone's. This is not a zero-sum game -- no one have to choose between this book or that one (but not both). All that matters is how many people find your book and like it enough to pluck do the cost of a cup of coffee (or maybe less). (If you are KU, your book is essentially free to readers; they can choose as many as they think they'll will read, and if they read 10% of yours, you get paid.)

The bottom line, if that you have to go to where the readers buy books if you want to sell books. In general, the readers buy eBooks on Amazon at about twice the rate of all other markets. But that doesn't mean they are going to your particular book.

So one has to figure out which distributors do best for them. For us, that's obviously Amazon. For you, it may not be. For one thing, shorter work doesn't seem to sell well on Amazon. I include short-story collections in that. From what I've heard, short-story collections do better on Smashwords.


message 42: by Owen (new)

Owen O'Neill (owen_r_oneill) | 1509 comments Rob wrote: "So far I'm not yet buying into the popular idea that Amazon could end up accounting for anything close to 2/3th of the sales though..."

Keep in mind that the 2/3rd number is an expected value, so one is pretty much only going to see it consistently where the law of large numbers applies. I suspect book sales obey a Poisson distribution, anyway.


message 43: by Nina (new)

Nina | 8 comments Owen wrote: "Nina wrote: "Well i am using KPD select, and i had a two day free for some people who asked me, mostly internet friends who asked me to. So i usually have about 4-5 borrows/lends on KU and about 2 ..."

Thats a great answer and yes, i am not planning on leaving Amazon. Thank you very much for the explanation. Can i ask if you are aware of how much royalties i get from the borrows? Per book?


message 44: by Nina (new)

Nina | 8 comments Christina wrote: "Nina wrote: "Can someone please inform me how the KPD select royalties are counted please? Cause i havent received any payments yet and i will like to know."

You are paid monthly, 60 days after th..."


Thank you very much. I love this place, and how people care to answer.


message 45: by Owen (new)

Owen O'Neill (owen_r_oneill) | 1509 comments Nina wrote: "Thats a great answer and yes, i am not planning on leaving Amazon. Thank you very much for the explanation. Can i ask if you are aware of how much royalties i get from the borrows? Per book? ..."

The KU payout is set for each month by Amazon, by the 15th of the following month. For the last few months it's been between $1.40 and $1.35 per borrowed book.


message 46: by J.D. (last edited May 20, 2015 03:50PM) (new)

J.D. Kaplan | 47 comments That analysis on "competition" has a few flaws in it.

1) the assumption that you are the typical reader. I don't know anyone in this day and age who makes themselves choose between two $1 books. If anything the choosing happens between the exorbitantly priced traditionally published books. I read voraciously. Way more than one hour a day. And I don't put any time limit on when I will read something by. I'm fine with buying 3 books and not getting to one for a while. I don't think readers in general make buying decisions while considering their reading "throughput". Think of it this way: if you loved Harry Potter and someone else has something similar, wouldn't you be interested in trying it out? It's not like a reader would say "No, I've read Harry Potter and that's really all I need to ever read in that genre. Now, where are the World War II history books?"

2) the underlying assumption you will see even remotely equivalent numbers of sales across the channels. I was on Smashword, B&N/Nook and iBooks for a year and sold nothing via those channels. During the same time period I was making consistent and regular sales via Amazon. In order to support the completely dead channels, I had to take a 50% loss in my potential earnings at Amazon. I stopped dealing with those other channels and my royalties went up significantly.


message 47: by Owen (new)

Owen O'Neill (owen_r_oneill) | 1509 comments Rob wrote: "So if you publish on both Amazon and the combined epub channels, your books will be competing with other Amazon word producers on Amazon and your words will be competing with other epub channel producers on the combined epub channels...."

I think you just attached an equal value to all books for all readers. Consider this: "Example: 1.000.000 authors publish a book with similar specs on both (simplified) channels." There is really no such thing as an "average/typical book". One million authors will not write a book similar to yours, or mine or each others. Our books are not "competing" with romance novels, or YA novels. In fact, when you come right down it, they aren't competing directly with any novels, because there are no other works just like them. Readers don't decide to read our books or Marko Kloos. They might read both.

Not all readers have a fixed degree of interest in all books, which is what I think your example assumes. As a practical matter, readers don't ration their reading time, they buy books based on interest. In essence, the population of books can be treated as "infinite". Adding more books doesn't make it "more infinite". There are always books out there than anyone can read or wants to read. So again, the total number of books in a channel does not relate to the probability of a sale because no person looking to buy can ever consider every book in that channel.

So again, it comes back to where the readers are -- more readers means a greater chance that a reader, searching a channel with an "infinite" number of books will find a particular book they want and buy it. If you want to look at it as reader minutes -- and that's really "applicable reader minutes" -- then go to where there are the most reader minutes available.

But real-world results trump abstract arguments about how markets work. As J.D says, his books simply did not sell on those other channels. So being there cost him money. So he dropped them. And that's really the empirical answer: see where your books sell, and sell them there.


message 48: by Phyllis (new)

Phyllis Entis | 43 comments Christina wrote: "I'm with Select for all my books at the moment. Every time I start to think about branching out, I get a spike in borrows, so I take it as a sign.
There's also the fact that I'm not keen on giving..."


I'm with you! I looked into the ibooks option, but drew back when I realized that Apple INSISTED on having a valid credit card on file (for 'verifying identity') - even though I wasn't buying anything - before I could self-publish an ibook through iTunes Connect.

I considerd using an aggregator, but didn't want that extra distribution layer between myself and the retailer. I published my debut novel using KDP Select, and will also do so with the sequel.


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