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Lords of the Sith (Star Wars)
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May 2015 - Lords of the Sith > Lords of the Sith Chapters 5-9

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message 1: by Aaron, Jedi Master (new) - rated it 3 stars

Aaron Goins (avgoins) | 213 comments Mod
This thread is for discussing chapters 5-9. Please do not post spoilers from chapters beyond chapter 9.


Dylan (dyltrocity) I've loved seeing the character of Cham explored some more and really enjoyed the strike against the star destroyer. Kemp writes dog fights quite well.


Nicholas Maertz | 1 comments I'm sure this makes me a horrible person but I do not like any of the hero characters in this book and I am actively rooting against them. I have to wonder if this is intentional. They seem to go out of their way to show how underhanded Cham is willing to be to accomplish his goals and the Imperials are almost depicted as being honorable. Mors and Vader are great and I legitimtly feel kinda bad for Belkor, but every time it cuts back to Cham or Isval I zone out.


Mike Tennill | 47 comments i didnt like any of the heros either. i did root for them at certain points.


message 5: by Al (new) - rated it 4 stars

Al Nowatzki | 13 comments I can't help but think of Hera whenever we see Cham in this book, and I feel like she must have learned a lot from his successes and failures. She's sneaky. But she also doesn't trust people easily, and is very wary of bring on new crew members, which was explored more in A New Dawn than in Rebels. I think Cham would be fine with bringing someone like Skelly (from A New Dawn) into his resistance, whereas Hera sees the pitfalls of someone like that. Isval is very Skelly-like, in my opinion.

Are Cham's freedom fighters (not terrorists) what a Rebellion looks like without the guidance of Jedi? Luke, by simple virtue of his involvement in the Rebellion, gave the rebels their moral compass, or at least filled the gap that was left after Kanan, Ezra and Ahsoka were mercilessly slaughtered by (fill in the blank).

Dodonna says "May the force be with you," before the battle of Yavin for a reason. Cham's freedom fighters (not terrorists) don't seem to have that moral compass that the larger Rebellion has further down the line. The heroes in this book are very flawed, and I think that's intentional.


message 6: by Danielson (new) - added it

Danielson W. Very well put Al I agree!


message 7: by Scott (new) - added it

Scott Mobley | 36 comments I concur. Stated wonderfully.


Sean Heller | 3 comments I do agree that it is really hard to like the hero. I do like the way Vader is portrayed.


Albert Nguyen Nicholas Maertz wrote: "I'm sure this makes me a horrible person but I do not like any of the hero characters in this book and I am actively rooting against them. I have to wonder if this is intentional. They seem to go..."

Which of the imperials did you find honorable? I found Mors to be a hedonistic spice-head, Belkor a power-hungry backstabber, and Vader a merciless war machine so I'm having trouble finding any of them even remotely honorable.

Personally I really like Cham. You can tell he's an idealist who's unafraid to be ruthless when necessary. At the same time however he's struggling with reconciling his morals with his actions indicated by how he always reminds himself he's "Not a terrorist, but a freedom fighter," which makes him a very interesting character. Isval on the other hand really annoys me because so far all she's proven to be is a murderous lunatic. I really hope she develops into more than that later in the book

Al bring up an interesting point because, if I recall correctly, Cham mentions at one point that he didn't have a good relationship with the Jedi. That could have contributed to their questionable morals. The Rebel Alliance on the other hand had a firm root in Jedi ideals probably because one of its founders, Bail Organa, had a close relationship with the Jedi. I don't think it was Luke exclusively that gave the Alliance their moral compass because Dodonna says "May the Force be with you" before Luke becomes a Jedi.


Dylan (dyltrocity) Something I've really enjoyed about Cham is the honesty he expresses as a leader. You see a guy who is sold out but still finds the reality of what's happening hard. You can tell he's fonts duly weighing up the risks and doesn't carry the weight of leadership lightly.

There's definitely much more to him taken I expected from Clone Wars.


Brittanie Oxner | 5 comments I'm so glad to see that other people are struggling to like the heros in this book too. I thought it was just because I am a dark side gal but they don't seem particularly nice. That scene with blackmailing/threatening Belkor really made me step back and go "wait, are these the good guys?" I did like the little insight into the PTSDish side of being a sex slave that they gave with Isvals story.


message 12: by Pikmin (new) - added it

Pikmin | 14 comments I am fully rooting for Cham and Isval, I think the chapter with Isval heading to under belly of the city and stalking the imperial officer certainly built the feeling of an oppressed people.

The Star Destroyer scenes also had all the necessary tension in them delightfully set up in the books opening

Dog fights and space battles are a tricky beast in pros and they were played out well, enough detail to picture ship movements without sounding like you are reading a role playing manual.

I don't think this book has made a miss step yet. It's currently up there with my top Star Wars books


message 13: by Kerry (last edited Jun 21, 2015 07:54AM) (new) - rated it 3 stars

Kerry Pikmin wrote: "I am fully rooting for Cham and Isval, I think the chapter with Isval heading to under belly of the city and stalking the imperial officer certainly built the feeling of an oppressed people.

The S..."
IMO Isval had real potential. An ex-Twilek slave. A version of her hunt could have been in a prologue or very early in story. She is brutal, dark-side angry, behaving like a terrorist. Isval's struggles could be the fight between dark and light writ small. Would also distinguish more between terrorist acts and freedom fighter to back up Cham's dialogue.


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