Vaginal Fantasy Book Club discussion

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May 2015: Driven/Dead Winter > Other Apocalypse Books

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message 1: by Felicia, Grand Duchess (new)

Felicia (feliciaday) | 740 comments Mod
If you guys have any other books that could be qualified as 'Apocalypse' leave suggestions here!

I read one recently called "Station Eleven" that wasn't romance persay, but it was an excellent example of "how the world recovers from a deadly flu apocalypse" really good!


message 2: by Louie (new)

Louie (rmutt1914) | 21 comments I've been wanting VF to try this series for a while now.

Aftertime by Sophie Littlefield




message 3: by Malaraa (new)

Malaraa | 335 comments The Dire Earth series was fun: The Darwin Elevator.

Watching the friendship grow in Radiant was nice too, and it was a very interesting world.

Neither one focuses on romance, but both fun reads.


message 4: by Ariel (new)

Ariel Stirling | 90 comments I absolutely loved a YA series I read about a year ago called Apocalypsis. The characters were fantastic and world building was interesting. No real sexy times but still awesome.


message 5: by Ariel (new)

Ariel Stirling | 90 comments I absolutely loved a YA series I read about a year ago called Apocalypsis. The characters were fantastic and world building was interesting. No real sexy times but still awesome.


message 6: by Ony091 (new)

Ony091 | 8 comments Angelfall comes to mind. It's also YA.


message 7: by Beth (new)

Beth P My twitter feed has been going nuts about Signal Boost (Off the Grid, #2) by Alyssa Cole by Alyssa Cole so I recently added it to my TBR pile. (Note: It's M/M)


message 8: by Taryn (new)

Taryn (taryngilliland) | 50 comments Ony091 wrote: "Angelfall comes to mind. It's also YA."

I was going to suggest Angelfall as well! :)

Is it cheating to mention The Hunger Games? Well, I'm going to anyway. ;)


message 9: by Nora (new)

Nora (ngoldie) | 3 comments Does She Has All the Gifts qualify? Wool by Hugh Howey. I suppose the MadAddam Trilogy by Margaret Atwood, Divided Kingdom by Rupert Thompson, and Y the Last Man.

But really fell in love with Station Eleven.


message 10: by Maria (new)

Maria (missmia277) | 44 comments I don't know if this counts but I really liked I Am Legend short story collection by Richard Matheson. Most of them were apocalypsey, I think, and few that weren't so obviously about an apocalypses.


message 11: by Lindsay (new)

Lindsay (the_great_linzini) | 56 comments I've really enjoyed the Off the Gird books thus far. They aren't set in a super distant / Mad Maxian / dystopian future though. It takes place after a solar flare causes electrical grids all over the world to fail and fries most of the electrical devices.

In the first book the main character is a college student named Arden. She and her best friend, John make the trek from Rochester NY to John's family home in upstate NY. They finally make it to the cabin and they are greeted by John's hunky older brother, (Gabriel), and teenage sister, (Maggie). John's parents however are missing... (Cue dramatic music).

Radio Silence (Off the Grid, #1) https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/2...

The second book is a M/M romance. I don't have anything against M/M stories, but I don't usually seek them out. I LOVED this book though, more than the first. - John was a computer science major / nerdy gamer type before the flare and he feels useless and lonely in his new reality. However, when he happens to catch a cute bespectacled astrophysicist stealing tomatoes from his vegetable garden things start looking up. - The characters are great in this one, the romance is really sweet and the sexy bits are super sexy, (I was pleasantly surprised).

Signal Boost (Off the Grid, #2) https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/2...

• Another thing I should mention about this series is the diversity of the characters. Arden is black and In addition to being gay John, (and his family), are Korean. Sometimes when people try to work ethnic diversity into a story it can feel kind of... forced, but that is not the case with these books. I felt the characters were well written and their various ethnic backgrounds helped add dimension without feeling like stereotypes.


message 12: by Lindsay (new)

Lindsay (the_great_linzini) | 56 comments I just finished "Signal Boost" today, here are some of my favorite bits...

"I’d wanted so badly to be in his presence, but now I felt awkward and too self- aware. Do I always walk this weirdly? Should I swing my arm now , or put my hands in my pocket? Why is everyone looking at me?"

"I pasted what I hoped was a normal, noncreepy smile on my face and hoped he couldn’t tell that my hands were clammy and my heart was racing."

"“You just made me want to weep for a hypothetical star,” I said. I struggled to pierce my straw through the aluminum- covered opening in the juice box, trying not to look too undignified. After several failed attempts, Mykhail reached over and shoved his straw into the hole of my box with amazing accuracy, then plucked my straw from my fingers and speared his own. He spoke again before I could even begin to process the metaphorical implications of his actions."

"I gathered from the way he smiled at the memory that his grandmother had thought Sagan was a babe, and really, who could resist a smooth operator in a turtleneck and a tweed jacket?"

"He poked at the tape binding his glasses, pushing them up the bridge of his nose before muttering a stream of Slavic on a sharp exhale. “My Ukrainian is rusty, so can you say that in English?” He was probably cursing me for being a creep, but I kept my tone cordial. It wasn’t his fault I’d tried to maul him without getting his explicit consent. Of course, in the leopard shifter romances Arden and Gabriel had talked me into reading, the hero never asked first. It was supposed to be more romantic that way."

"Maybe I’d expected him to give me a smoldering look instead of taking me along for practicality’s sake. I felt like the useful tool one picked up on a quest in an RPG game instead of the item that made a player fist pump in triumph when obtained. Well, if I was more med kit than flamethrower, so be it."


message 13: by Ken (new)

Ken (fleetwizard) | 1 comments It surprises me that no one, at least as far as I've seen looking through the to read and red lists and some of the posts in the forum, has mentioned Anyone? by Angela Scott. I just finished the book and it is great. It's a YA novel about a high school girl who spends the first couple of months after the apocalypse in a bomb shelter that her dad had built and tells her to stay put in while he finds her brother. Romance isn't the big thing, but there is some there. One to think about anyway, and I just read on her Goodreads page that there is going to be at least a second book now as well.

Another great series, although it really doesn't fall under the "Apocalypse" banner, unless you consider Tory's world view, is the Virals series by Kathy Reichs and her son Brendan.

Another long series that has been out and actually just finished last year that would kind of fit is The Hollows Series by Kim Harrison. They are easy to recognize as the title of each book is based in part on the book and in part on the titles of Clint Eastwood movies, such as the first book in the series, Dead Witch Walking, or the second book, The Good, The Bad, and the Undead. The Witch With No Name, the 13th and last book in the series, was published this past September.


message 14: by Claire (new)

Claire (cacromwell) | 221 comments Ken wrote: "The Hollows Series by Kim Harrison. They are easy to recognize as the title of each book is based in part on the book and in part on the titles of Clint Eastwood movies" I had no idea about that - cool! I've had the first one on my TBR list for a little while, mostly b/c of the tomato thing.

For YA dystopia, I really like the Razorland trilogy by Ann Aguirre. It starts with Enclave and the descriptions of the post-catastrophe world were very vivid, but not in a scary way, since this is targeted at a younger audience.

I've also loved Gathering Blue by Lois Lowry since high school (~10 years ago). It's loosely connected to The Giver, but more rural-life focused. I loved the parts that focus on dyeing and weaving, since I do both of those crafts.

For the grown-up crowd:

I'll second the recs for Alyssa Cole's Off The Grid series.

Night Whispers by Alisha Rai is really good if you're into zombie apocalypse scenarios. The heroine is based in a survivor camp on the other side of the US from the hero, who is her handler on supply runs and scouting missions. They only have contact via radio at the beginning of the story, so instead of love at first sight there is trepidation on both their parts when the possibility of meeting face-to-face comes up.

If you want a little paranormal with your dystopia, the London Undead trilogy by P.J. Schnyder is pretty good. Each book is only novella-length and you can get the set for under $9 at Amazon. In this world, a zombie plague has overrun London and the supes - werewolves, were-leopards & Bean Sidhe/Fae - are the only ones unaffected. There are still areas of human habitation that they try to defend, along with a few plucky homo sapiens.

And if you want a heap of sexy times to go with a "perfect city" and the slums that support it, a la Hunger Games, look no further than the Beyond series by Kit Rocha. Beyond Shame is the first book and they (Rocha is a duo) are releasing the 7th book later this month. There are a smattering of novellas in there as well. The Beyond books are definitely erotica, so don't read if you aren't interested in graphic depictions and fluid sexuality, but they have really strong plot lines as well. The focus is on Sector Four, one of the 8 outlying semi-slums that support Eden, the only (?) surviving city after a solar flare knocked out all the electrics and things we take for granted. Sector Four is ruled by Dallas O'Kane and his gang; throughout the series you get to see the political maneuvering between the sectors, life from POVs both inside and outside the gang, and a glimpse at life beyond the sector boundaries. Really good writing overall and highly recommended.


message 15: by Serena (new)

Serena | 4 comments If something with zombies and YA appeals, I found The Forest of Hands and Teeth a interesting social set up.

I also liked Kim Harrison's Dead Witch Walking, with a post apocalypse collapse of human control of Earth due to genetically tampered tomatoes, where vampires, werewolves, witches, demons, and fairy step in fill the population void.


message 16: by Louie (new)

Louie (rmutt1914) | 21 comments Speaking of zombie apocalypse, Madeleine Roux's two novels are worth a look.

-Allison Hewitt Is Trapped
-Sadie Walker is Stranded




Alana ~ The Book Pimp (loonyalana) | 124 comments Serena wrote: "I also liked Kim Harrison's Dead Witch Walking, with a post apocalypse collapse of human control of Earth due to genetically tampered tomatoes, where vampires, werewolves, witches, demons, and fairy step in fill the population void. "

Oh, yes, yes, yes! LOVE that series!

OKAY- my YA suggestions:
The 5th Wave (The Fifth Wave, #1) by Rick Yancey The Infinite Sea (The 5th Wave, #2) by Rick Yancey
The Testing (The Testing, #1) by Joelle Charbonneau Independent Study (The Testing, #2) by Joelle Charbonneau
Enclave (Razorland, #1) by Ann Aguirre Outpost (Razorland, #2) by Ann Aguirre Horde (Razorland, #3) by Ann Aguirre
Under the Never Sky (Under the Never Sky, #1) by Veronica Rossi Through the Ever Night (Under the Never Sky, #2) by Veronica Rossi Into the Still Blue (Under the Never Sky, #3) by Veronica Rossi
The Moon Dwellers (The Dwellers, #1) by David Estes The Star Dwellers (The Dwellers, #2) by David Estes The Sun Dwellers (The Dwellers, #3) by David Estes The Earth Dwellers (The Dwellers, #4) by David Estes

Edging into NA or Adult:
Switch (New World, #1) by Janelle Stalder Masked (New World, #2) by Janelle Stalder Tested (New World, #3) by Janelle Stalder
Beyond the Night (Envy Chronicles, #1) by Joss Ware
The Glass Man (Lila Gray, #1) by Jocelyn Adams Shadowborn (Lila Gray, #2) by Jocelyn Adams Rise of the Magi (Lila Gray, #3) by Jocelyn Adams Into The Unknown (Holloway Pack #1.5, Mimics of Rune #1.5, Lila Gray #1.5) by Jocelyn Adams


message 18: by Frakki (last edited May 10, 2015 05:09AM) (new)

Frakki Karu | 509 comments Al Gore needs to write a book where every thing goes wrong -- EMP, solar flares, flooding -- but society thrives because they planned and prepared.


message 19: by Frakki (new)

Frakki Karu | 509 comments FYI -- that was a joke ;-)


message 20: by Icia (new)

Icia (pttybjrn) | 5 comments Dies the Fire by S.M. Simmons (maybe? not positive of thelast name) is the first book in a large series called The Change. A global EMP scrambles all technology and strangely enough, gunpowder as well. US is thrown into a sort of medieval and brutal world. there's a teeny bit of romance, I think I got distracted and didn't finish it. There was a (god awful) TV series based on the book too.


message 21: by Laura (new)

Laura | 14 comments Newsflesh Trilogy by Mira Grant. Zombies. It's brilliant.


message 22: by Icia (new)

Icia (pttybjrn) | 5 comments Dies the Fire's author is Stirling.


message 23: by Peter (new)

Peter | 55 comments Icia wrote: "Dies the Fire's author is Stirling."
S.M. Stirling's trilogy Dies the Fire/The Protector's War/A Meeting at Corvallis is about an unexplained global phenomenon which stops high technology and high speed chemical reactions (explosives and guns) from working. The first book centres around Mike, a small-aircraft pilot with survival skills and Juniper, a Wiccan woman (no magic) with a network of like-minded people, and skills in various crafts, agriculture, etc. Each builds a sustainable small community before they meet.

His Change series focuses on different characters some years afterwards.

Similar, but in a different world, is his trilogy Island in the Sea of Time/Against the Tide of Years/On the Ocean of Eternity, in which Nantucket Island is transported back to the Bronze Age. All the people and technology on the island are there, but they can't resupply any high tech except for what they can make themselves, and other relatively high-tech items, such as steel, repurposed (e.g. swords). The main character is a black lesbian ex-coastguard.

Both series have interesting world-building and plotting, but definitely not VF. Sex is a very minor part of both series, and personal interactions are mostly about friendship, love and villains.


message 24: by Madeline (new)

Madeline Monk | 3 comments Icia wrote: "Dies the Fire by S.M. Simmons (maybe? not positive of thelast name) is the first book in a large series called The Change. A global EMP scrambles all technology and strangely enough, gunpowder as ..."

Close - it's S. M. Stirling.


message 25: by Neohgirl (new)

Neohgirl | 68 comments I absolutely love Stirling's Nantucket trilogy *_*


message 26: by [deleted user] (new)

Louie wrote: "I've been wanting VF to try this series for a while now.

Aftertime by Sophie Littlefield

"


I read another book by Sophie Littlefield. She's awesome so thanks for the heads up!


message 27: by Louie (new)

Louie (rmutt1914) | 21 comments Coral wrote: "I read another book by Sophie Littlefield. She's awesome so thanks for the heads up! "

It's a trilogy, btw. ;)


message 28: by Linnea (new)

Linnea (robotmaria) | 81 comments For the VF audience there is The Battle Lord's Lady by Linda Mooney, which is post-apoc. with romance. I've been wanting to check it out for some time.


message 29: by [deleted user] (new)

Louie wrote: "Coral wrote: "I read another book by Sophie Littlefield. She's awesome so thanks for the heads up! "

It's a trilogy, btw. ;)"


They have the trilogy on Scribd so I'm good to go! :)


message 30: by Frakki (new)

Frakki Karu | 509 comments I loved the book Oryx and Crake by my favorite author Margaret Atwood. It's very funny and has great cultural predictions. It's life after a man-made virus takes out humanity.

It isn't a romance novel, but it does have a loves story. of course, being Atwood, it a bit twisted. :-)


message 31: by Tiffany (new)

Tiffany Frakki you crack me up! Yes Al Gore needs to write a post apocalyptic romance. I would read it.

And yes, anything by Margaret Atwood. The hand maiden's tale, anyone? Although not all that much sexy stuff, more eeuw-y stuff.


message 32: by Minsta (last edited Jun 03, 2015 06:24PM) (new)

Minsta | 93 comments The latest book from Neal Stephenson fits this category: Seveneves. It is heavy on the SciFi and light on the romance. I am halfway through and recommend it...


message 33: by [deleted user] (new)

In the Hangout they came up with Trocalypse and that reminded it's already been done REALLY well by this author - Dead Tropics


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