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Recommendations > New SK reader here !! :D

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message 1: by Kranthi (new)

Kranthi Kumar | 1 comments Hello all I am kranthi from India :) I am new to Stephen king novels.. and I have few doubts :

1) I bought few books from the local store : The Shining,Bag Of Bones, The cell, Buick 8. Can anyone please say what to read 1st? The Order i should go..

2) The Language (English) is it easily understood?

3) Should i buy dark tower series soon after i complete the above list? or go to other books? If Yes, what other good books u would recoomend for the 1st time SK readers?


Thanks in advance :)


message 2: by José (last edited May 02, 2015 08:49AM) (new)

José (lectorconstante19) Hi Kranthi! Bag of Bones was my first King book so I love it, but of the list you made I would suggest that you read The Shining first it's an awesome book.

Secondly I would read Cell or bag of bones (although I didn't like cell many people does so it's your choice, if you prefer apocalyptic stories go on with Cell). Buick 8 definitely last because it's an average book that can be rather dull for new readers.

About the language I can't say because I've read most books in Spanish, the few that I read in English weren't hard to understand.

And finally about the Dark Tower I think that you should read some of his other works in order to fully appreciate it, specially Salem's Lot, The Stand and the Eyes of the dragon.

Hope you enjoy reading those books they are awesome!


message 3: by Paul (new)

Paul | 17 comments Hi Kranthi,

I agree that you should probably start with the shining. That is a classic King novel that shows you how scary his books can be. Bag of Bones on the other hand is a beautifully written book that shows how much range and talent he has as a writer. I also agree I would wait a little while before picking up the Dark Tower. Enjoy!


message 4: by Nick (new)

Nick Iuppa | 3975 comments Kranthi wrote: "Hello all I am kranthi from India :) I am new to Stephen king novels.. and I have few doubts :

1) I bought few books from the local store : The Shining,Bag Of Bones, The cell, Buick 8. Can anyone ..."


Karanthi - There are few questions you could ask that would get as much universal agreement. The Shining may be King's best book... though it is pure horror, it is excellent. So you should start there. Bag of Bones is way up there on the list, read it next. In fact if someone were to ask which King books to read first without have bought any, I might recommend those two. Cell is okay. Some people really like Buick 8... but I have it on my list of his poorest works. Try Duma Key, or Cujo, or the long walk or even IT or The Stand instead. As for the Dark Tower... you might enjoy reading one book right after the other and that's a lot of pages. As for his use of English. King's writing is magical. He may be the easiest writer to read today. His sentences just flow. He doesn't use many unusual words (well, okay "officious" is in the first sentence of The Shining but that's unusual.) He's exacting, and not too colloquial. I'm sure you'll enjoy him.


message 5: by Danielle (new)

Danielle | 57 comments 1. The Shining
Bag of Bones
2. Cell
3. Buick 8


message 6: by Lydia (new)

Lydia | 13 comments I second Ethan's list. Also, I would suggest trying one of his short story or novella collections as a way to experience more of King's range.


message 7: by Terri (new)

Terri Edwards (teresaluvsbooks) | 149 comments I've been catching up on SK for the last year after taking a sabbatical for 20 years, and I had reservations about reading The Green Mile and Hearts in Atlantis, but I have to say those have become two of my favorites, and novels I would recommend as well. Duma Key and, while lengthy, 11/22/63, are also excellent reads. But for me, the ultimate King read is The Stand; I've read it three times and probably will many more before I'm done on this earth :) I also agree with the others' choices.


message 8: by Lydia (new)

Lydia | 13 comments Teresa wrote: "I've been catching up on SK for the last year after taking a sabbatical for 20 years, and I had reservations about reading The Green Mile and Hearts in Atlantis, but I have to say those have become..."

The Stand was my first and still my favorite :)


message 9: by Terri (new)

Terri Edwards (teresaluvsbooks) | 149 comments Lydia wrote: "Teresa wrote: "I've been catching up on SK for the last year after taking a sabbatical for 20 years, and I had reservations about reading The Green Mile and Hearts in Atlantis, but I have to say th..."

Absolutely :)


message 10: by Kat (new)

Kat (katsobsession) | 40 comments I highly recommend The Stand (uncut version) and The Tommyknockers.


message 11: by Ron (new)

Ron | 134 comments Teresa wrote: "I've been catching up on SK for the last year after taking a sabbatical for 20 years, and I had reservations about reading The Green Mile and Hearts in Atlantis, but I have to say those have become..."

20 year sabbatical is a long time! What happened? I did that with King for a few years (when he left The Gunslinger hanging for so long). Bag of Bones brought me back.


message 12: by Nick (new)

Nick Iuppa | 3975 comments Ron wrote: "Teresa wrote: "I've been catching up on SK for the last year after taking a sabbatical for 20 years, and I had reservations about reading The Green Mile and Hearts in Atlantis, but I have to say th..."

Hey Ron, just finished Bag of Bones and posted a review. I loved the book (again.) Here's the link to my review.

https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...


message 13: by Ron (new)

Ron | 134 comments Nick wrote: "Ron wrote: "Teresa wrote: "I've been catching up on SK for the last year after taking a sabbatical for 20 years, and I had reservations about reading The Green Mile and Hearts in Atlantis, but I ha..."

Checking it out. Thank you Nick.


message 14: by Terri (new)

Terri Edwards (teresaluvsbooks) | 149 comments Ron wrote: "Teresa wrote: "I've been catching up on SK for the last year after taking a sabbatical for 20 years, and I had reservations about reading The Green Mile and Hearts in Atlantis, but I have to say th..."

He sort of lost me with Dolores Claiborne; I was so used to his novels with a more horror feel but, at the time, he got too "out there" for me. For some reason (and thank goodness it happened!), I picked up The Stand last spring and decided to reread it and, as soon as I began reading, I was reminded of why I love his novels. I've been playing catch-up for the last year; I've completed all the novels up to Finders Keepers, with the exception of the DT series, and the later short story collections. It's been a marvelous ride!


message 15: by Ron (new)

Ron | 134 comments I had skipped Dolores Claiborne too. Then I saw the movie (that was good). Can you read a book after seeing the movie? A friend gave me The Stand, when the uncut edition came out...his story pulled me right in. Love that you've been reading all the books!


message 16: by Terri (new)

Terri Edwards (teresaluvsbooks) | 149 comments Ron wrote: "I had skipped Dolores Claiborne too. Then I saw the movie (that was good). Can you read a book after seeing the movie? A friend gave me The Stand, when the uncut edition came out...his story pulled..."

I usually have to read the book first before I see the movie!


message 17: by Aditya (new)

Aditya I was reading a King book every one or two weeks but after Gerald's Game and Dolores Claiborne I decided to shelf the project of reading all King books. I figured with a bibliography as large and diverse as his, there are bound to be a few stinkers. Since then I am picking and choosing which of his books to read and that seemed to have paid off. Recently read Bag of Bones which I really enjoyed and now skipping both Dreamcatcher and The Girl who loved Tom Gordon.


message 18: by Terri (new)

Terri Edwards (teresaluvsbooks) | 149 comments Aditya wrote: "I was reading a King book every one or two weeks but after Gerald's Game and Dolores Claiborne I decided to shelf the project of reading all King books. I figured with a bibliography as large and d..."

I initially resisted The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon, The Green Mile, and Hearts in Atlantis, but because I decided I was going to try and read everything I'd missed since the early 90s, I did read them. I liked TGWLTG, but The Green Mile and Hearts turned out to be favorites. After I've finished the DT series and the short story collections I missed, I'm going to start on rereads. Looking forward to it immensely!


message 19: by Nick (new)

Nick Iuppa | 3975 comments Aditya wrote: "I was reading a King book every one or two weeks but after Gerald's Game and Dolores Claiborne I decided to shelf the project of reading all King books. I figured with a bibliography as large and d..."

Okay, Aditya, but I have to say that The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon is one of my favorites. It's also one I constantly recommend to non-horror readers. Liking baseball does help, but there's something intriguing about a little girl lost in the woods for weeks whose only touch with the outside world (and her only real inspiration) are the evening baseball broadcasts that she is able to get on her portable radio with its dying batteries... and then there's the bear.


message 20: by Miriam (new)

Miriam (chkntza) Ron wrote: "I had skipped Dolores Claiborne too. Then I saw the movie (that was good). Can you read a book after seeing the movie? A friend gave me The Stand, when the uncut edition came out...his story pulled..."
I always read the book after the movie because I think the book is always so much better than the movie. The better the movie the better the book.


message 21: by Aditya (new)

Aditya Teresa wrote: "I initially resisted The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon, The Green Mile, and Hearts in Atlantis, but because I decided I was going to try and read everything I'd missed since the early 90s, I did read them..."

Darabont's movie adaptation is one of my favorite films of all time so I read The Green Mile with heightened expectations which it met ably, it's one of King's best. I was thinking of reading Hearts in Atlantis next, your recommendation is another plus in its favor.


message 22: by Aditya (new)

Aditya Nick wrote: "Okay, Aditya, but I have to say that The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon is one of my favorites. It's also one I constantly recommend to non-horror readers..."

I have a very rudimentary understanding of Baseball, like any cricket lover worth his salt I believe it is the game those people play who are too unsophisticated to understand the nuances of cricket. Actually aren't the rules of American Rugby markedly differently from normal Rugby, don't you call Football Soccer? You have got an obscene fascination with bastardizing every sport known to men. I guess the only American sport I had ever enjoyed is WWE and I use the term sport very loosely in this case.

Jokes aside I mostly agree with your takes on King book but knowing nothing about Baseball and reading the plot summary which hints at a slow paced read to begin with which is sure to sound longer to me with all the Baseball references; I will probably skip this one. Furthermore I am in midst of reading James Ellroy's L.A. Quartet books which probably compress 1000 pages of plot in 500 pages without sacrificing on character building, it would only point out even more succinctly that sometimes King's overtly verbose style leads to nothing but unwanted plodding.


message 23: by Terri (new)

Terri Edwards (teresaluvsbooks) | 149 comments Aditya wrote: "Teresa wrote: "I initially resisted The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon, The Green Mile, and Hearts in Atlantis, but because I decided I was going to try and read everything I'd missed since the early 90..."

I hope you'll enjoy it! My husband, like me, didn't really want to read Hearts because, after seeing the movie first, we weren't all that impressed. But after I read it I talked him into reading it, and he loved it as well. For me, the book was so much deeper and better than the movie. One of those rare cases where I saw the movie before reading the book, and very glad I didn't "write" it off :) (Pun intended!)


message 24: by Aditya (new)

Aditya Teresa wrote: "I hope you'll enjoy it! My husband, like me, didn't really want to read Hearts because, after seeing the movie first, we weren't all that impressed. But after I read it I talked him into reading it, and he loved it as well..."

I guess it's not easy to translate King books to films as the only adaptations of his which I like are Stand By Me and the 3 Darabont movies - Shawshank, Green Mile, Mist. Sometimes I think watching the movie first is better as the book is almost always the superior version of the tale and after reading the better version, it is hard to go back and enjoy the movie.


message 25: by Nick (new)

Nick Iuppa | 3975 comments Aditya wrote: "Nick wrote: "Okay, Aditya, but I have to say that The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon is one of my favorites. It's also one I constantly recommend to non-horror readers..."

I have a very rudimentary und..."


ALL RIGHT!! I'm sending you a friend request so I can message you.


message 26: by Ron (new)

Ron | 134 comments Miriam wrote: "Ron wrote: "I had skipped Dolores Claiborne too. Then I saw the movie (that was good). Can you read a book after seeing the movie? A friend gave me The Stand, when the uncut edition came out...his ..."

I like that you can do that. I never want to know the end of the story before reading the book. I've known some people who look to the end of the book before their finished. And I'm like, what!


message 27: by Ron (new)

Ron | 134 comments Aditya wrote: "Nick wrote: "Okay, Aditya, but I have to say that The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon is one of my favorites. It's also one I constantly recommend to non-horror readers..."

I have a very rudimentary und..."


I'm sure James Ellroy's books will keep you busy and satisfied.
Your understanding of baseball is probably like mine of cricket. I guess being a baseball fan would enhance the reading Tom Gordon, but probably not by much. It's been a long time since reading that one, but I remember that like The Eyes of the Dragon, it's a book that is a tangent to Kings's usual stories.


message 28: by Aditya (new)

Aditya Ron wrote: "I'm sure James Ellroy's books will keep you busy and satisfied.
Your understanding of baseball is probably like mine of cricket. I guess being a baseball fan would enhance the reading Tom Gordon..."


I have not read The Eyes of the Dragon either, as I was saving the Dark Tower series for the end of King marathon. I mainly read thrillers and mysteries and Ellroy is fast becoming the best I have read in the genre.


message 29: by Terri (new)

Terri Edwards (teresaluvsbooks) | 149 comments Aditya wrote: "Ron wrote: "I'm sure James Ellroy's books will keep you busy and satisfied.
Your understanding of baseball is probably like mine of cricket. I guess being a baseball fan would enhance the reading T..."


I'm saving the DT series for the end of my King marathon as well. I'll have to try James Ellroy. I've never heard of him.


message 30: by Aditya (new)

Aditya Teresa wrote: "I'm saving the DT series for the end of my King marathon as well. I'll have to try James Ellroy. I've never heard of him."

If you like crime/mystery/thrillers, you should give Ellroy a chance. He is a master of intricate plots and realistic characters but be warned his books are unrelentingly cynical. It does not bother me and should not bother anyone when the stories are so gripping but if bleakness or violence puts you off, then you may think twice before giving them a try.


message 31: by Tek (new)

Tek | 94 comments 1) Of the ones you've got...The Shining is the one to start with. More people love that than hate it. It's about middle of the pack with me, but majority opinion favors it. Bag of Bones is really good but a little long. So make sure you're ready for a longer story if you start it. Cell is a good, relatively quick read. It reads like a movie screenplay. Very fast paced compared to most King. From a buick 8 is the worst one on your list. Still ok...but im saying that as someone that has enjoyed most of Kings works. I wouldn't start there, and if you don't enjoy his other novels then i probably would skip Buick 8.

2) The Language (English) is it easily understood?
I think so...but english is my first language. King doesn't tend to get wordy like a lot of other authors do. That's actually a common criticism of his that i hear.

3) First time King reader suggestions: Carrie. It's kings first novel and probably the best one to get a taste for his style. It's also relatively short compared to most of his works. Night Shift is a good one as well. It's a short story collection. Salems Lot is a good one too, Another early King novel, this one being a bit longer, but it's a full fledged vampire tale with great characters and a well built environment.


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