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Death Drops (A Natural Remedies Mystery #1)
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Featured Series and Cozies > Natural Remedies Mysteries (Death Drops) - Christle Fiedler

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message 1: by Nell (last edited May 01, 2015 05:25AM) (new)

Nell | 2567 comments Mod
This month's featured read is Death Drops by Chrystle Fiedler. The main character is Willow McQuade, a naturopathic physician on Long Island in New York.
Death Drops (A Natural Remedies Mystery #1) by Chrystle Fiedler

Other book in the series:
Scent to Kill (A Natural Remedies Mystery #2) by Chrystle Fiedler


message 2: by AngryGreyCat (last edited May 03, 2015 05:17PM) (new) - rated it 2 stars

AngryGreyCat (angrygreycatreads) | 665 comments I picked this book because I am always interested in health related reads. I had not heard of this before I started researching for health/fitness related cozies.

To think about while reading:
The nature of this book seems to me to invite comparison with the China Bayles series by Susan Wittig Albert. So, if you have read the China Bayles, how do you think this compares?

What do you think about the theme? Does it overwhelm the mystery? Is the herbal remedies information interesting?

I'll think of some other question as I read through the book.


jaxnsmom | 2396 comments Mod
***Please don't let the following influence your desire to read the book. I would love to know if others agree or disagree with my various points.***

I'm only about halfway through, but I can say this is nothing like the China Bayles series, except for a character in each being called by their last name and that name sounds the same.

So far I find the theme overbearing, and I'm about ready to throw the book across the room the next time the word organic is used (which I'm sure will be in the next page). I get it, Willow uses organic and natural products as much as possible. This is really driving me nuts and I'm going to need a cup of chamomile tea pretty soon.

I find the herbal information dangerous as included in the replies to the letters. Amounts and method of taking the herbs are usually not provided, nor any warnings of possible interactions or when to see a physician. I know this isn't a guide to taking herbal remedies, but a simple sentence about reading the instructions and/or consulting a knowledgeable source would seem to be in order.

I don't like how Dr. McQuade gives out recommendations willy-nilly. I would expect a doctor to want to know more about a person - health history, allergies, any other drugs/remedies being taken.

You might ask why these things bother me so much when this is just a cozy mystery, and not a medical resource. I had high hopes for this book, I really wanted to like it. I don't know, maybe I'll change my mind by the end of the book.

As far as the mystery itself, it seems to have gotten lost within everything else going on. There are too may other things happening, but we only get a small reminder of them now and then. I'm not sure why, but I'm going to finish the ^#%^*# book.


AngryGreyCat (angrygreycatreads) | 665 comments jaxnsmom wrote: "***Please don't let the following influence your desire to read the book. I would love to know if others agree or disagree with my various points.***

I'm only about halfway through, but I can say..."


You summed up how I felt about this book much better than I could have. Homeopathic remedies can be dangerous when not monitored or when interacting with conventional medicine. The fact that she wanders around giving medical advice without taking a full medical history just makes me shudder. I guess this bothered me so much because I really wanted to like this book.


Mary (mw8019) | 273 comments jaxnsmom wrote: "***Please don't let the following influence your desire to read the book. I would love to know if others agree or disagree with my various points.***

I'm only about halfway through, but I can say..."


I am enjoying the book very much and I am planning to look into her methods further on my own when I am finished with the book.

I find the book both uplifting and informative on many levels. I feel sorry for Willow she is trying to find the murderer and run the store and café which she is not really sure of how to do.

She needs help and doesn't seem to be getting as much as she needs. Getting rid of Janice would be a big help.

I can't wait to finish the book.

Mary


message 6: by Anne (new)

Anne Bannon | 30 comments I rather liked the book overall even though I was put off by the advice column bits and the heavy-handed preachy-ness of it. I used to work in a health food store and Willow's behavior is very common among those folks. I do like that she supports research (and there are some good scientific studies out there that do support some holistic/alternative medical practices). I also liked that she doesn't reject conventional medicine and even uses it herself.

Other than that, it was well plotted. I didn't guess whodunnit. And I like the characters, tho Janice definitely needs to go. She's too abrasive to be real.

As for all the naturopathic stuff, a lot of times people prescribe with abandon because the ingredients are "all natural" and organic, meaning benign. This is bull puckey. Snake venom is all natural. You can grow oleander and tobacco organically and that will not make then any less toxic than they already are - which is plenty darned.


Mary (mw8019) | 273 comments I really enjoyed both of the books for the month of May. They were informative and both were good mysteries. The books from April did not keep my interest. Maisie Dobbs was good, but the other one was not my kind of book. At least this month's books I could relate to and actually try to figure out who dun it!

Very good reads for May. I hope the books for June are
just as good.

Mary


AngryGreyCat (angrygreycatreads) | 665 comments Mary wrote: "I really enjoyed both of the books for the month of May. They were informative and both were good mysteries. The books from April did not keep my interest. Maisie Dobbs was good, but the other one ..."

I am really glad that you liked them. I really liked this theme and I especially liked the J.B. Stanley series. I liked some aspects of Death Drops but some of it seemed a little pushy. It may just be because it was first in a series and the protagonist mellows more later. Another reader commented that the "pushiness" is actually very accurate of many of the people in the natural health fields because they are so enthusiastic about their field.


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