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message 1: by Pavan (new)

Pavan Kaur (pavankaur) | 89 comments Hello everyone. I am a new author and as a new author, I am going through on of them hard promoting stages.
My first book Moving On from the Moving Series is out on May 2nd and it ready to Pre Order, and I really would love some help on how you all promoted your book to the world.
I have a Facebook and Twitter account.
I just made a blog too and can't wait to start writing more on there (would it be silly just to write about my book or should I write about personal things too?)

So I was hoping that some of you can help give some advice.

Thank you xx


message 2: by Amanda (last edited Apr 27, 2015 05:48AM) (new)

Amanda Siegrist (amandasiegrist) | 190 comments I'm in the same boat as you. I've made a rare posts on twitter and facebook about my book because I don't want to come off as "buy me buy me". I more started doing something silly called 'Word of the day'...first part is an example of how the word is used, usually a little snippet that could be from a book (not necessarily mine) and the second part is how the word is used related to what happened in my life that day (i.e. generally my girls). I also recently started a blog, noticing from within this group, that is a good way to go. I have no idea what to blog and I really go day-to-day. I blog about me though. I like crafts, cooking, baking, DIY projects so I do things like that. I also write about random stuff, and something I called "little joys in life", and occasionally I throw in something about writing. I've been not trying to overload people with my book, but instead getting to know me as a person. I've noticed that people sometimes rather get to know who you are and will not like the 'overloading them with buy me'. Have I noticed an increase in sales? No. But I've only just started and it takes time and A LOT of work to gather a following. So I am just going with the flow. I enjoy blogging for the most part. If no one reads it other than me, I see it as a diary of a sort...lol:) I do post it on my personal FB page as well, so I know at least a few of my friends look at it. I noticed I get more page views on days I do crafts, DIY, baking, and little joy of life more so than I do on the other ones. This probably was of no help to you...lol, but I'm new too to this all and that's what I've been doing. Good luck and I'm sure if you write what you enjoy writing about, it'll sound better and people will enjoy it better instead of trying to pull something you don't really want to write about.

And I forgot to add that I do then Pin my blog posts on one of my boards on Pinterest because that's another way to get yourself out there. I actually have more people follow me on Pinterest than I do anywhere else. Although, I have been doing that for years now. Any way counts out there.


message 3: by Matthew (new)

Matthew Wooding (matthewwooding) | 2 comments I'm also new to all this. I'm trying to look at what I post through the eyes of those following me or those I want to follow me. I feel really uncomfortable taking the 'buy me, buy me' approach, and if I'm following someone I wouldn't want them to be preaching at me in any case. I try to post funny or interesting things as well as limiting my twitter rambles about my football team (which is tough lol). I haven't gone the blog route which may work against me, but it would be a pain in my ass trying to think of something to blog about so I'm putting mental health first on this one.
There are a few promotional websites I found on a google search that endlessly tweet my book from their accounts which I think is useful as it doesn't show on my timeline but keeps my book with an online presence. I think the whole process is just a matter of trial and error


message 4: by Pavan (new)

Pavan Kaur (pavankaur) | 89 comments Amanda wrote: "I'm in the same boat as you. I've made a rare posts on twitter and facebook about my book because I don't want to come off as "buy me buy me". I more started doing something silly called 'Word of..."

Thank you for this, I was thinking about adding personal things into my blog too, so that readers can get to know be as a person rather than a author. I did start promoting my book everyday on Facebook groups, but this week taking a little step back and only doing that twice instead of everyday.
The book is on pre order and will be out on May 2nd so the weekend I am thinking promote promote and promote :)
Thank you so much for your comment it help me, as now I will post on my blog about me and things I do and hope for the best.

I know that is takes time and I am ready for this, because I believe i have a good story and more stories to share with everyone xx


message 5: by Pavan (new)

Pavan Kaur (pavankaur) | 89 comments Matthew wrote: "I'm also new to all this. I'm trying to look at what I post through the eyes of those following me or those I want to follow me. I feel really uncomfortable taking the 'buy me, buy me' approach, an..."

Thank you I was buy me buy me, but this week I am taking a little backseat with that and working on my blog, and I think that I will do some personal blogging on there, it might even be good for me to share my love for thing and relax my brain a little more.

It is a slow progress but one I am enjoying as I get to meet new people from around the world, and hope one day that those people read my story and I can say I got a review from America or Australia. Now that would be amazing.
One step at a time xx


message 6: by Amanda (new)

Amanda Siegrist (amandasiegrist) | 190 comments Pavan wrote: "Amanda wrote: "I'm in the same boat as you. I've made a rare posts on twitter and facebook about my book because I don't want to come off as "buy me buy me". I more started doing something silly ..."

Glad it could help as I feel like I'm always getting the help and not dishing it out...so yay! Hope it works out and I'm sure people will appreciate hearing about you as a person as well. One thing I blogged about was a recipe for apple pie. Pretty generic, but I also had one of my characters make an apple pie in my book and referenced that (*wink, wink*). So I do throw little snippets of book here and there in my blogs sometimes, but nothing overt.


message 7: by Pavan (new)

Pavan Kaur (pavankaur) | 89 comments Amanda wrote: "Pavan wrote: "Amanda wrote: "I'm in the same boat as you. I've made a rare posts on twitter and facebook about my book because I don't want to come off as "buy me buy me". I more started doing so..."

Lol, thats a good idea throwing in hint. I think I will do a blog today about my weekend or something :)


message 8: by Aurelia (new)

Aurelia Casey (amcasey) | 7 comments read John Locke's book How I Sold 1 Million eBooks in 5 Months

He has a lot of useful thoughts on all this. Specifically, with blogging and social media, think of the central themes in your book and write posts/tweets/messages about things that have happened to you that fit into that theme so that the people who resonate with your post are the people who will resonate with your book


message 9: by Jenycka (new)

Jenycka Wolfe (jenyckawolfe) | 301 comments Hey all,
I've noticed a direct uptick in sales on the days that I post scenes of my books on the blog. Like, even if it's just a few paragraphs. Give people a taste, and they seem to want more.

Having more information about your series on the blog seems to help as well. Gets people more invested. Like, I have pictures and character profiles about my Wildlands series and people will read that stuff. Especially someone who has just come across one book in the series and wants to know more before they fully invest.


message 10: by Ken (new)

Ken Doggett (kendoggett) I've posted short excerpts on Twitter and Facebook. It generates traffic to my website, but it doesn't seem to affect sales very much for me, if at all.


message 11: by Courtney (new)

Courtney Wells | 138 comments Weird you should mention posting scenes!

I had I particularly productive weekend and posted a small exchange from my roughdraft on Facebook and some friends were intrigued and asking questions.

So, yeah, I think definitely share some interesting/non-specific stuff on media outlets since you want to entice people without confusing them due to being out of context or spoil any good bits :)


message 12: by Aurelia (new)

Aurelia Casey (amcasey) | 7 comments V.M. wrote: "Aurelia,

While John Locke's ideas may be sound to practice, please take his success with a grain of salt, as the man has been discredited. He bought hundreds of reviews and is somewhat of a charla..."


I was looking specifically at his approach toward the content he put in specific blog posts, and his thoughts on finding a target audience, which many other successful indie authors use to good effect (Joanna Penn, Sean Platt & Johnny B Truant, and others).

I don't know about the purchased reviews etc, I only discovered his books a couple days ago, but from what he wrote in that book, which I read and is the sole source of my knowledge of him (so I understand if my info is biased), nothing he recommends doing is morally questionable. Whether you can get millions of sales using those techniques or not, I think as a long-term marketing strategy his approach to themed, targeted posts to blogs and social media makes sense for attracting those repeat readers we all want.


message 13: by Pavan (new)

Pavan Kaur (pavankaur) | 89 comments Jenycka wrote: "Hey all,
I've noticed a direct uptick in sales on the days that I post scenes of my books on the blog. Like, even if it's just a few paragraphs. Give people a taste, and they seem to want more.

Ha..."


My book comes out in four days so for the next three days I'm going to out up little bits here there of the book on my blog.
Pictures of character did u go online and find a picture of who you thought most look wise was your character because I like that


message 14: by Pavan (new)

Pavan Kaur (pavankaur) | 89 comments Courtney wrote: "Weird you should mention posting scenes!

I had I particularly productive weekend and posted a small exchange from my roughdraft on Facebook and some friends were intrigued and asking questions.
..."


I will be doing this for the next three days on my blog until realise day, and then after too to get more people to read xx


message 15: by Jenycka (new)

Jenycka Wolfe (jenyckawolfe) | 301 comments Pavan wrote: "Pictures of character did u go online and find a picture of who you thought most look wise was your character because I like that "

I went on stock photo websites where you can purchase the rights to use a picture for your website, etc. That makes it legal, and no copyright infringement occurs. I use the site depositphotos.com.


message 16: by Pavan (new)

Pavan Kaur (pavankaur) | 89 comments Jenycka wrote: "Pavan wrote: "Pictures of character did u go online and find a picture of who you thought most look wise was your character because I like that "

I went on stock photo websites where you can purch..."


Thank you, I was wondering how you can do that, so you don't use celebrates as your character then?
As I think it's a good idea showing the characters in you blog, but what do you write about them that doesn't give to much away about them


message 17: by Pavan (new)

Pavan Kaur (pavankaur) | 89 comments V.M. wrote: "Aurelia,

Yes, the steps you're taking are good ones, just pointing out some background on the person himself.

As for posting scenes, if it works do it. Can be a great way to build interest in you..."


Very happy that I joined goodreads, I have learnt a lot reading posts and things.
The characters picture is the ? For me do I use a famous person I think my character looks like or when I was writing thinking about or do I find a picture of someone not famous and use that


message 18: by Pavan (new)

Pavan Kaur (pavankaur) | 89 comments V.M. wrote: "Pavan,

It's really up to you. Famous people will certainly be more recognizable, which may help your readers engage. One of the things I do with my subscribers is engage them in Fan-Casting, wher..."


I like that, my books out on Saturday so I might do a profile for the characters on who I think they look like, then once I get some readers start a fan casting
Thank you x


message 19: by Pavan (new)

Pavan Kaur (pavankaur) | 89 comments Igzy wrote: "Pavan wrote: "Thank you, I was wondering how you can do that, so you don't use celebrates as your character then?
As I think it's a good idea showing the characters in you blog, but what do you wri..."


That's a nice idea I will look around to see if I can find anything, in the meantime I will do a post on a profile and see how it turns out.
Thank you x


message 20: by Igzy (new)

Igzy Dewitt (IgzyDewitt) | 148 comments If you have a bit of a budget, many artists just starting out will offer character portraits, ranging from sketches to full color, for anywhere from $5 bucks up to $40.00 or so. I really like the idea of introducing art for your characters to help your potential readership get interested in your work. Quite a few are also trying to build a following and will offer weekly 'freebies' to lucky winners so long as they get a plug for their work wherever you choose to show it.


message 21: by Owen (new)

Owen O'Neill (owen_r_oneill) | 1509 comments If you haven't found it yet, this is a good discussion here in this group: https://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/...

Lots of good, real-world insights there.


message 22: by Pavan (new)

Pavan Kaur (pavankaur) | 89 comments Owen wrote: "If you haven't found it yet, this is a good discussion here in this group: https://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/...

Lots of good, real-world insights there."


Thank I just had a look there and ti helped a lot :)


message 23: by J.D. (new)

J.D. Kaplan | 47 comments I have come to the conclusion that while marketing is really important, it's more important to keep writing. With my first book, when I finished it and published it I went into high powered marketing mode, spending most of my free time trying to get the book in front of as many people as possible. As a result I spent little time actually writing.

This time around I'm marketing still but nowhere near as aggressively as I was. I'm concentrating on getting my third book published by the end of the year. It's my feeling that it's just as important to get more books published to your 'shelf'.

I use twitter twice a day fairly intensively, write to my blog a few times a week and deal with facebook that often as well. I also do reviews and interviews on my blog on the side but I am careful to keep focused on my writing for the majority of my time.


message 24: by Maurice (new)

Maurice Miller (mauricegmiller) | 116 comments J.D. wrote: "I have come to the conclusion that while marketing is really important, it's more important to keep writing. With my first book, when I finished it and published it I went into high powered marketi..."

Sounds like a good philosophy. I am "caught up" in the launch of my first book. I think once you have your platforms established it gets much easier to spend less time on promotion and more on writing.


message 25: by J.D. (new)

J.D. Kaplan | 47 comments Maurice wrote: "Sounds like a good philosophy. I am "caught up" in the launch of my first book. I think once you have your platforms established it gets much easier to spend less time on promotion and more on writing. "

Yep, I totally agree. Getting those platforms up and running is really the hard part.


message 26: by Lora (new)

Lora Edwards (loraedwards) | 28 comments I have a question anyone heard of self publisher's here is the website. http://selfpublishersshowcase.com/joi...
I looked at their prices pretty good to help get you out there and they have a pretty big twitter following and facebook following they say that they will promote your work and set you up with an author page.
Thanks for any feedback you guys have


message 27: by Riley, Viking Extraordinaire (new)

Riley Amos Westbrook (sonshinegreene) | 1510 comments Mod
If you have 35 dollars it can't hurt, but understand that retweeting only goes so far. it helps a lot, but a better thing to do is to start like a weekly blog or something along that nature. still probably not a bad investment, just not a guaranteed one.


message 28: by Lora (new)

Lora Edwards (loraedwards) | 28 comments Ok thanks for the feedback. I started a blog on my website but I am not sure how to get it out there.


message 29: by Riley, Viking Extraordinaire (new)

Riley Amos Westbrook (sonshinegreene) | 1510 comments Mod
Honestly when I first started I just looked for blogs that were of interest to me and signed up and read them and participated the same as you do on the forums here. bloggers are a really friendly community, I found a lot of support from them and they helped give me courage to be willing to put my writing out.


message 30: by Christina (last edited Apr 29, 2015 08:52PM) (new)

Christina McMullen (cmcmullen) One thing to take into consideration with any service who claims to have X amount of followers is how many of them are actual interested readers? Often those thousands of twitter followers are authors like me, who the promoters followed first, who pay no attention to their ads, and have no intention of ever buying anything they promote.
Many of them will also require you to sign up for their newsletter in order to promote you and then they will claim you as one of their 'thousands of subscribers.'


message 31: by Riley, Viking Extraordinaire (new)

Riley Amos Westbrook (sonshinegreene) | 1510 comments Mod
Christina wrote: "One thing to take into consideration with any service who claims to have X amount of followers is how many of them are actual interested readers? Often those thousands of twitter followers are auth..."

So you're telling me I should start to charge for my retweets? Just kidding


message 32: by Christina (new)

Christina McMullen (cmcmullen) Lol, as much as you tweet? Yes!


message 33: by Courtney (new)

Courtney Wells | 138 comments I've also heard tell that some of these followers are just random grabs from various countries that may or may not even understand the language of the tweets being sent so might not be supremely effective if there's a language barrier :(


message 34: by Riley, Viking Extraordinaire (new)

Riley Amos Westbrook (sonshinegreene) | 1510 comments Mod
Christina wrote: "Lol, as much as you tweet? Yes!"

I look to #Bookboost for support, if she can tweet to 18k followers for free, why can't I do it with my shade under 8 and a half? I could never charge to tweet, though it is a lot of work so I do understand why some do. My friends tell me I'm to kind for my own good.
Btw, speaking of promoting on Twitter #bookboost will tweet you up to three times a day for FREE! 18k followers that are a mix of readers and authors, and an all around awesome woman.


message 35: by Emeka (new)

Emeka Egbuonu (emeka_bnc) | 8 comments The bottom line is people on social media do not care about you or your books.9 i mean that in the nicest possible way) Its like walking into a conference and you know no one, but then start shouting 'Hey, look at me , I just wrote a book' you would not do that in real life and online is also a no no. Instead show them who you are slowly, be social, comment interact show off your personality. Once they are interested in you then they might care about your work.
Never take any personally, everyone is busy trying to achieve their goals. You just have to be good at getting their attention so you can realise your dreams as writer.


message 36: by Emeka (new)

Emeka Egbuonu (emeka_bnc) | 8 comments You need to create a core readership, small group of fans of people that love your work. 10, 15, 20. Keep them engaged, they will help you build those number so long as you are writing and producing great content. Then the aim is to aim for 100 core fans, etc. Each true fan is a potential marketer that would do the most important thing of all 'spreading the message via word of mouth'.
Secondly as popular as sites like goodreads, facebook twitter etc are, they are all flavours of the month on somebody else's platform. If your whole campaign and book promo is based on that, what if these platforms became obsolete tomorrow. How will you connect with your readers.
The best thing is to build an email list of true loyal fans that want to know more about your work. It will be slow but at least you know that you are writing for them.
That after every book you have a fan base of 100, 200 etc that are looking forward to your book.
So if all these platforms that you have no control over disappear (like myspace did and many musician were left feeling lost) you would still have a direct line to your readers.
I am on that journey of building my core fans base. One person at a time, it will not happen overnight.


message 37: by Morris (last edited Jun 16, 2015 10:31AM) (new)

Morris Graham (morris_g) I agree with Emeka about building a core of readers, and she had some other good advice. I think it is good to pause after every book you publish, get feedback from reviews, correct whatever you can to tighten it up, republish an updated edition, and then take some time out to explore marketing opportunities. Goodreads is a great place to meet people, but every conversation shouldn't be, "My book..." Once you've got you name out there, and you've done what you can, then go back and write and publish more.

Morris


message 38: by Pavan (new)

Pavan Kaur (pavankaur) | 89 comments Thank you, for this advice, I have taken a small break and now writing the 2nd in the Moving Series. I think with series readers tend to wait for them all to be out.
I am enjoying my writing at the moment and promoting and marketing are take a side step to writing now as I really enjoy the writing xx


message 39: by Morris (new)

Morris Graham (morris_g) One of the articles I read once said that your second book sells your first book. I believe it, and hope to be proving that when I get a second one published.

Morris


message 40: by JM (new)

JM Jordan | 11 comments Emeka wrote: "You need to create a core readership, small group of fans of people that love your work. 10, 15, 20. Keep them engaged, they will help you build those number so long as you are writing and producin..."

I love this btw, at the moment I feel like core fans won't likely be the people you expeted. :-/


message 41: by Riley, Viking Extraordinaire (new)

Riley Amos Westbrook (sonshinegreene) | 1510 comments Mod
Hey JM, you're more than welcome to create a thread asking for feedback, but we tend to try to keep threads related to who started them. Welcome to the blogsphere though, and you're right about the people who become your core being the least expected people!


message 42: by JM (new)

JM Jordan | 11 comments Thanks Riley! I'm so new at all of this I feel like I'm bumbling around in the dark!


message 43: by Riley, Viking Extraordinaire (new)

Riley Amos Westbrook (sonshinegreene) | 1510 comments Mod
That's why we're here!


message 44: by Owen (new)

Owen O'Neill (owen_r_oneill) | 1509 comments Emeka wrote: "You need to create a core readership, small group of fans of people that love your work. 10, 15, 20. Keep them engaged, they will help you build those number so long as you are writing and producin..."

I completely agree with this and the previous comment.


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