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Bulletin Board > Reviews that are obviously by Friends of the Author

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message 1: by Lokki (new)

Lokki (lokki8) | 12 comments So, I have a question regarding reviews that are blatantly written by friends of the author wanting to do their buddy a favour by giving him or her a 5 star review. Do you feel these are actually beneficial to a new author?

As a reader always on the look out for new material to read, I constantly scan new reviews. I am always leery of the 5 star reviews, unless the reviewer can back it up with more than 'What a great book! I loved it!". Well bully for you, but why did you love it? That's what I want to know.

I also think that it is fairly obvious if you look at the profile of these type of reviews only to see that they have only ever reviewed this one book or happen to live in the same city as the author. Frankly, these types of 'reviews' piss me off as much as the so-called 5 star reviews for books that aren't even published yet by fans that give the book a review just so they can say "OMG I can't wait to read this book! Squeeee!!"

Maybe it's just me though....


message 2: by K.P. (new)

K.P. Merriweather (kp_merriweather) | 276 comments not just you homie.


message 3: by Victoria (new)

Victoria Zigler (toriz) | 2886 comments As a point, reviews that just say "I loved this book" and have a five star rating aren't always from friends or family members of the author. Sometimes they're from people who thought it was a great book, wanted to say so, but weren't sure what else to say. I know those reviews aren't very helpful, but to some authors they're better than nothing, and I've left a few like that for authors I don't know from Adam, just because I loved their book, wanted to review it, but wasn't sure what else to say after saying I loved it.

Sure, it's better to have detailed reviews, and it's also better if they're not from friends and family, but can you really blame people for getting reviews any way they can? I mean, with how unreliable giving away copies in exchange for honest reviews can be sometimes... And I'm talking about the fact you can give out 100 copies, and will be lucky if 10 people actually do a review for you; something I'm sure many of us have had to deal with in the past.

So, yes, it would be nice if people didn't have most of their reviews from friends or family members. On the other hand, I'm jealous of those people, because their friends and family are obviously paying more attention to their books than mine are paying to mine.


Paganalexandria Lokki wrote: "So, I have a question regarding reviews that are blatantly written by friends of the author wanting to do their buddy a favour by giving him or her a 5 star review. Do you feel these are actually ..."

They don't bother me any more than someone's mom at the talent show clapping too loud for their tone deaf, can't dance son. It's kind of expected. People who love you are supposed to think it's great because they saw the effort put in to create it. I'm fine with anyone saying "whatever" in their review space. Now when those same friends and family take it upon themselves to troll anything negative other reviewers post...then my problems start.


message 5: by Mellie (new)

Mellie (mellie42) | 541 comments I disregard them. Just like the author review jerk circles where they 5-star each other's books, but the reviews makes it fairly obvious they haven't even read the book.


message 6: by Shaun (last edited Apr 24, 2015 08:38PM) (new)

Shaun (shaun2014) | 11 comments Like A.W., I disregard them. When I go looking at the reviews I tend to read a few of the longer 4 or 5 star reviews, then I search out a few longer 1 or 2 star reviews. Longer doesn't necessarily mean better, but I can more safely assume they have actually read the book. I really only read reviews if I'm hedging on whether or not I want to read the book. If I already know I want to read the book, or I'm going to read the book, I don't read the reviews for it beforehand.

Victoria wrote: And I'm talking about the fact you can give out 100 copies, and will be lucky if 10 people actually do a review for you; something I'm sure many of us have had to deal with in the past.

Wow. I've been on this site less than a year, and have won a few books in giveaways. I *always* give a review for any book I receive in a giveaway. I guess I was naive to think that that was the norm. Admittedly I don't check to see how many others that have been chosen as a winner actually write reviews, I just assumed it was nearly all. I guess that isn't even close to correct. :(


message 7: by Virginia (new)

Virginia | 34 comments I don't pay much attention to them, but I don't think they're any less useful than a five star rating without a review attached. Honestly, as a reader, I don't pay much attention to any review that doesn't have at least one bit of constructive criticism in it.

As an author, all reviews are worth their weight in gold, and while I'd rather have reviews that are thoughtful even if they're negative, I will happily take one liners that say "great job!"

I have actually asked my family not to review my books as I don't think they can be objective about them. They don't always listen to me, however.


message 8: by Victoria (new)

Victoria Zigler (toriz) | 2886 comments Shaun wrote: "Wow. I've been on this site less than a year, and have won a few books in giveaways. I *always* give a review for any book I receive in a giveaway. I guess I was naive to think that that was the norm. Admittedly I don't check to see how many others that have been chosen as a winner actually write reviews, I just assumed it was nearly all. I guess that isn't even close to correct. :("

I wish that was the norm, but unfortunately not.

I was quite disappointed the first time I gave out review copies, because half the people I gave copies to didn't do reviews. When I asked a fellow author about it, he told me he wished he'd been as lucky as me and had half the copies reviewed when he gave away books in exchange for reviews. I've since heard of loads of situations where people have given away loads of copies for review, and only gotten a review or two out of it; situations which have made it clear to me that he was right, and I was lucky to get as many reviews as I did (though I'm still disappointed in the number of people who didn't review books I gave them copies of in exchange for a review).

I always make a point of doing a detailed review if I was given a copy of a book in exchange for a review, and I know there are others who do too. Unfortunately, there are also people who just take the free copy and run, so to speak.


message 9: by Victoria (new)

Victoria Zigler (toriz) | 2886 comments Paganalexandria **wicked juices bubbling over** wrote: "Now when those same friends and family take it upon themselves to troll anything negative other reviewers post...then my problems start."

*Nods in agreement*


message 10: by Andrea (new)

Andrea Jackson (paperbackdiva) | 108 comments Do most authors expect a review in return for giveaways? I guess I thought it was a kind of thank you to fans, a way to generate a little buzz.

If I accept a book where a review is stipulated, then yes, I'll review. Of course, then I feel guilty if I hated the book. I can point out things that I think need improving, but a full Simon Cowell slap-fest, I'm too soft to do. I've heard other reviewers state they don't give a review at all if they feel that way.

So what do most authors expect when they give away books in contests or raffles or blog tours?


message 11: by Shaun (new)

Shaun (shaun2014) | 11 comments Andrea wrote: "Do most authors expect a review in return for giveaways? I guess I thought it was a kind of thank you to fans, a way to generate a little buzz.

If I accept a book where a review is stipulated, th..."


The language of the giveaways has changed a bit. There is this line still in the giveaway details for each giveaway - Winners are encouraged but not required to review the books they win.

Before the language change (which happened last month I believe) it was clear that the main reason for the giveaway was in hopes of an honest review from the winner(s).

I figure it's the least I could do for the author and/or publisher. I *am* getting a free book out of the deal.

Then again, I notice some people enter every single giveaway listed. That's a bit ridiculous. I only enter giveaways for books that I truly wouldn't mind reading. I have to at least have some sort of interest in the book. If the giveaways were a thank you to fans, you'd only expect fans to sign up for the giveaway. That may be the case at a reading or raffle or something, where they are truly fans.


Victoria wrote: Unfortunately, there are also people who just take the free copy and run, so to speak.

That actually makes me a bit mad. In situations like that, the author and/or publisher is less likely to list a giveaway again. Which harms us all.

disclaimer: I'm only a reader...not an author, so I wouldn't presume to speak for anyone else but myself. I don't want to make it seem like I'm leading some righteous charge...just putting forth my opinion on the matter.


message 12: by Sarah (new)

Sarah Stuart | 108 comments I review almost every book I read: only "almost" because being asked to review annoys me, however politely it's expressed, and sometimes it's almost a demand.

Re giveaways specifically, If I want to read a book I'm prepared to buy it, and if it's by an Indie author, I'm more likely to do so.

The only advantage I can see to giveaways is if they're print copies that might be passed on and gain the author publicity.


message 13: by Andrea (new)

Andrea Jackson (paperbackdiva) | 108 comments Is this about giveaways in general or just about GR giveaways?


message 14: by D.S. (new)

D.S. Wrights (dswrights) So I am not allowed to befriend people on GR because otherwise their reviews are not taken seriously?
I've met some very nice people I get along with through them reviewing my book.

Yes, of course there are family & friends out there even authors that rate their own books five stars. But there are also good and nice reviewers out there being perfectly honest.

I have some (5 star) reviews myself, which I am not happy with for several reasons...

I don't expect a review of a giveaway, otherwise it wouldn't be a giveaway but a read2review.
There are still people out there, applying for a R2R who are never ever even posting a review or rate a book.

We have black sheep everywhere but it would be unfair to blame everyone because of the few that break the rules.


message 15: by Paganalexandria (last edited Apr 25, 2015 04:51AM) (new)

Paganalexandria John wrote: "Like most authors, we need reviews more than money in the initial launch phase. No reviews, no takers. So I at least get something from these leaches, my books can only be obtained free from Amazon or Smashwords so at least I can evaluate the quality of the take-up."

I am a person, not a leech. As a reader I don't exist for you. The same way Neil Gaiman wrote that epic blog post about a particular George R.R. Martin fan's entitlement issues.
http://journal.neilgaiman.com/2009/05...
That goes both ways.


message 16: by Sarah (new)

Sarah Stuart | 108 comments John wrote: "Dear Sarah,
It is unfortunate that people asking for reviews annoys you, lots of things annoy me, but that would not be one of them.
You have the option to ignore the request, rejection is a famili..."


What would annoy you? No sales? They, and loans, are the biggest vote of confidence of all, and the records are there for us to read without nagging anybody.

The reason is partly due to the wording in many books where this occurs and, much as I appreciate reviews, all you will find in the back of the eBook version of my own novel is an invitation to connect with me on Twitter etc.

Asking for reviews was a subject that's come up on Goodreads before and, as far as I can remember it, this is a quote from one post.

"When a person purchases a book it becomes their property in exactly the same way any other item does and they are entitled to do what they like with it, including using it under the leg of a wobbly table"

Obviously the book would have to be the print version but the point is well made. Purchasers owe us nothing, however much time, hard work, and love, went into writing a book. If they take the trouble to write a review, good or critical, it's a bonus. Personally I always leave a comment when I spot a new review: just a thank you.

I agree with Paganalexandria: readers are not leeches. I don't write for profit, though I do donate royalties to charity: I write because I enjoy it, and readers who do tell me what they think makes it even more worthwhile.

I did say I review most of the books I read and I do that because I know how much I appreciate it when readers do it for me.


message 17: by Ken (new)

Ken Doggett (kendoggett) I write for both fun and profit. Why not?--nothing wrong with profit; it's a very pleasant way to keep score. I would like to have more interaction with those who read my books, but people these days are so prickly about it I'm afraid even to thank someone for a good review.

We can think of more ways in today's society to start arguments and stay at each other's throats than at almost any other time in history.


message 18: by S. (last edited Apr 25, 2015 07:23AM) (new)

S. Rivera (sjacksonrivera) | 47 comments I WISH I could get my friends and family to write reviews. They all promise to but don't.

And then, I wish I could get Amazon to actually print the reviews my family and friends submit--the few who actually do try to submit reviews. Amazon has super-psychic powers and seems to think they know everyone related to me and they refuse to allow those reviews to post--even though they have really read the book as I spoon-fed them the chapters as I got them written because I needed their encouragement and criticism to make it better...and they are brutally honest!

While I do this for my sanity and will continue to do it even if I never do make any money at it, I'd love to make a living at this. In the old days, (I'm sure still) the big publishing houses paid for reviews to boost sales and I'd consider that if I knew how to do it, but I don't, so I stick to the GR giveaways (to get 1 review in exchange for 12 free copies), twitter, FB, etc.

I've never been a wordy reviewer. I've always written the "I loved it" or "This book was okay" because I hate reading lengthy reviews that seem like the reviewer feels the need to re-tell the story in their own words. I find that pointless. I want to know if the book is worth buying. I don't want to read it before I read it.

But now that I am an author who's feelings would probably be hurt if I got a bad review, (haven't so far in my only 23 reviews on 2 books, and only a couple of those are from friends who made it through Amazon's psychic powers of knowledge about me--PHEW!)

I feel nervous to write too much. If I like it, I review to help get their numbers up and show support, and if I didn't like it, I just don't review because I don't want anyone's writing career/their belief in themselves, anywhere near my hands.


message 19: by Paganalexandria (last edited Apr 25, 2015 07:37AM) (new)

Paganalexandria Ken wrote: "I write for both fun and profit. Why not?--nothing wrong with profit; it's a very pleasant way to keep score. I would like to have more interaction with those who read my books, but people these ..."

Ken I think it's a beautiful thing for someone to love the profession they chose. It doesn't happen all the time. At the same time, writing is considered part of the arts. When an artist moves their passion from the hobby realm, into the professional, riches aren't a forgone conclusion. It does matter if they're an actor, musician, painter, or writer. Every month Amazon offers free music downloads from mostly unknown music artists. I have never heard one of them insulting the music fans because they didn't leave a review. The same concept applies to readers being called a leech for downloading a free book from Amazon, and failing to leave a review. Personally speaking, positive buzz from other sources like group latest read threads, and real life discussions are more apt to convince me to give books a chance, than reading a stranger’s reviews anyway. That same “leech” that dared to download legally what was offered might not have written a review, but told all his or her friends about the great book they read. It’s just something to think about.

For the record, being offended by that other poster's inference isn't being prickly; it's reacting to a legitimate insult.


message 20: by Lokki (new)

Lokki (lokki8) | 12 comments D.S. wrote: "So I am not allowed to befriend people on GR because otherwise their reviews are not taken seriously?
I've met some very nice people I get along with through them reviewing my book."


That wasn't the type of review I was referring to. I have no problem with that (hopefully the review is honest and not an auto-5-star). If you are an active member of the GR community, you can't help but make friends or connections (unless you're a complete a$$hole I suppose). But that is part of why I don't like the other kind of reviews. The ones where the reviewer joins GR specifically to rate or review their family or friend's book but never has or probably never will be an active member of the community. The kind that have no books on their shelves other than that particular book and have never rated or reviewed any other book. Those are the ones that bug me.


message 21: by Ed (new)

Ed Morawski | 229 comments S. wrote: "I WISH I could get my friends and family to write reviews. They all promise to but don't.

And then, I wish I could get Amazon to actually print the reviews my family and friends submit--the few wh..."


S. - same problem here. Amazon has rejected reviews from dozens of my friends whom I didn't even ask to write reviews. They all contacted me in to tell me they tried. Yet every day I see glowing reviews about horrible books that I've read. How does this happen?


message 22: by Lokki (new)

Lokki (lokki8) | 12 comments S. wrote: "to get 1 review in exchange for 12 free copies"

Wow, I didn't realize it was like that. I guess because it would never cross my mind to say I will review a book for a free copy and then not provide a review. It's tough though when I end up not liking the book. I feel bad writing a negative review in these cases and so I try to just keep it to the facts as to why I didn't like it without being too snide (as opposed to some of my reviews where I bought the book and hated it and have no problem writing a scathing, snarky review).


message 23: by Sarah (new)

Sarah Stuart | 108 comments S. wrote: "I WISH I could get my friends and family to write reviews. They all promise to but don't.

And then, I wish I could get Amazon to actually print the reviews my family and friends submit--the few wh..."


Amazon don't just bar family from writing reviews, they include everybody you've had the courtesy to acknowledge for their help. A vicar/priest/church minister helped me with research. His wife, who had nothing to do with the book whatever, had a review refused. (They have an unusual name.)


message 24: by Sarah (new)

Sarah Stuart | 108 comments Lokki wrote: "D.S. wrote: "So I am not allowed to befriend people on GR because otherwise their reviews are not taken seriously?
I've met some very nice people I get along with through them reviewing my book."

..."


I've never had a Goodreads friend barred from leaving a review, as far as I know.


message 25: by Debbi (new)

Debbi Silverman (debbisilverman) | 2 comments Lokki wrote: "So, I have a question regarding reviews that are blatantly written by friends of the author wanting to do their buddy a favour by giving him or her a 5 star review. Do you feel these are actually ..."

Obviously, friends will be the first to read any book, but most of my friends needed to be invited to review it. Not all readers assume their opinions matter. I'm a very new published author and overall I think the few friends who will review and give a book a glowing tribute will be offset by the idiots who live to be nasty. I think it strikes a nice balance.


message 26: by S. (new)

S. Rivera (sjacksonrivera) | 47 comments Sarah wrote: "Lokki wrote: "D.S. wrote: "So I am not allowed to befriend people on GR because otherwise their reviews are not taken seriously?
I've met some very nice people I get along with through them reviewi..."


I find myself friending more and more people on GR based on a mutual respect for each other's work. After reading, not before. I didn't think about it biting us in the butt.


message 27: by S. (last edited Apr 25, 2015 08:51AM) (new)

S. Rivera (sjacksonrivera) | 47 comments Sarah wrote: "S. wrote: "I WISH I could get my friends and family to write reviews. They all promise to but don't.

And then, I wish I could get Amazon to actually print the reviews my family and friends submit-..."


Yes. I shake my head when I hear of people I knew in high school, but besides reconnecting on FB, have not seen them in decades, but their reviews are denied. Seriously? They buy and read because of that sentimental connection, not because I asked them to. Why does their opinion not matter or how will it be unfair somehow?

... And then I see books that are truly horrible- no plot, poor grammar, tons of typos, too detailed--one read like a police report-- yet had 300 raving reviews.


message 28: by Lokki (new)

Lokki (lokki8) | 12 comments Thanks for all your comments everyone. I'm finding the conversation enlightening.

Some comments that stick out (sorry I can't remember who said what):

-the idea of the 5 star friend reviews balancing out the flaming reviews from malicious reviewers. I can nod my head at that one.

-the idea of the early friend reviews helping to prime the pump....okay I can sort of get on board with that, the only issue I see is if the 5 star reviews aren't really warranted and so the person that bought the book based on early reviews is really disappointed and not afraid to tell everyone

-people can be real jerks actually getting a freebie in return for a promised honest review but then just 'taking the book and running' (which is different than just receiving a book for free in a giveaway). I guess I really shouldn't be surprised that this happens but I was.


message 29: by Charles (new)

Charles | 2 comments As a highly ranked reviewer on Amazon, I receive many requests for reviews. Authors should understand that I never guarantee a review, my standard response is "I am interested in reviewing this book." That comment means that their description of the book is enough to interest me in it. It would be foolish to guarantee a review of a book sent to me without knowing what it is like.

It is also a bit presumptuous of authors to believe that all reviewers that receive a free book will spend the hours it takes to read and review the book. Reading a book is one of the most individual experiences and some books just do not light a fire in me. Even when they are in a genre that I enjoy.

I recommend that all authors contemplating contacting highly ranked reviewers first read the book "Naked Truths About Getting Book Reviews" by Gisela Hausmann. It is short and packed with key information for authors. It is cheaper than sending a free book and will increase your review rate of return.

Also, NEVER, EVER send a message demanding to know when the review will appear.


message 30: by Victoria (new)

Victoria Zigler (toriz) | 2886 comments Andrea wrote: "Do most authors expect a review in return for giveaways? I guess I thought it was a kind of thank you to fans, a way to generate a little buzz.

If I accept a book where a review is stipulated, th..."


I was talking about when you actually give copies in exchange for reviews, not general giveaways.


message 31: by Karma♥Bites ^.~ (last edited Apr 25, 2015 09:33PM) (new)

Karma♥Bites ^.~ (karma_bites) | 215 comments John wrote: "...It is unfortunate that people asking for reviews annoys you, lots of things annoy me, but that would not be one of them. ..."

I should hope not as you have no problem using GR's PM system to spam members.


John wrote: "...It is just not credible for a normal working person to read much more than a couple of books per week, on average. When I see someone in their early life with more than a thousand books, or 10 years of reading, I wonder how that is realistic. When I see someone in their early life with more than a thousand books, or 10 years of reading, I wonder how that is realistic. ..."

John, FWIW, some of my family members' annual read count is @ 500 or so per year. Gotta love retirement, eh? But then, some younger family members read anywhere from 200-500 per year, even tho some have school and extracurricular activities. (I'm lucky if I manage a modest 150-250 per yr, given RL obligations).

Also wonder why you automatically equate 'want to read' (as in 'wish to read' or 'interested in') to 'WILL read'.

But I so appreciate your opinion on what is or is not 'realistic' or 'credible' re: reading habits.


John wrote: "...I also think that many readers are an ungrateful bunch who grab free books with no thought about the author. ..."

OMG, thank you for reminding me! Our dept provided a free lunch this past week and I completely forgot to think about the people who prepared the food. And the person who ordered & paid for it. Och, mea culpa!

etc: typos


message 32: by Victoria (new)

Victoria Zigler (toriz) | 2886 comments Why should the number of books someone reads make any difference?

Some people struggle to read more than a book a month, some people can easily get through a few hundred books a year, and some are somewhere in the middle.

Reading figures don't always reflect employment/educational situations either. I know people in school or work who can easily get through a book in a day or two, and others who are retired but struggle to read more than a book a month.


message 33: by BR (new)

BR Kingsolver (brkingsolver) | 36 comments It is true that books provided for review often just disappear and the author never hears from the person again. It is also true that some authors trade reviews with other authors. It's considered unethical, but the big publishers have been doing it forever. They have one of their authors write "best book since The Grapes of Wrath" and plaster it on the blurb. I think most people in this country discount such marketing.

As far as friends and family giving out five-star reviews, I think that's probably not as big a problem as some people seem to think. How many friends and family members do you have that you can talk into doing anything for you? If a book has 30 5-star reviews and a sprinkling of other ones, then I tend to assume most of them are honest.

You have to balance that out against the trolls who go around giving 1-star ratings with no review who haven't read the book. There are a number of "Goodreads librarians" who do this on a regular basis. When a person rates 30 books in a day, all 1-star with no reviews, and their profile is private, and they've done it over and over ... I've seen 1-star ratings for books that haven't been published yet, and the same "reviewer" has done the same thing to all of that author's books.

For me, I tend to read the 1-star reviews. If the reviewer doesn't like the book for reasons I probably wouldn't like the book, I pass it by. But I also buy a lot of books due to 1-star reviews because the reviewer is complaining about things I think I would like.

Besides, a lot of the 1-star reviews are hilarious.


message 34: by K.P. (new)

K.P. Merriweather (kp_merriweather) | 276 comments i sign up for giveaways hoping to score a book i actually want to read and i usually end up buying when i have the change (i hadnt won one yet lolz). i review when i can though... im lucky to get the few reviews i do get and i've long stopped asking. just roll with it and keep creating


message 35: by K.P. (new)

K.P. Merriweather (kp_merriweather) | 276 comments most of my friends and family dont read the genres i write and asking them to even read my works is akin to putting a gun to their heads. (they tend to read urban fiction, romance, or christian fiction) so no worries of fake 5 stars here...


message 36: by Victoria (new)

Victoria Zigler (toriz) | 2886 comments B.R. wrote: "As far as friends and family giving out five-star reviews, I think that's probably not as big a problem as some people seem to think. How many friends and family members do you have that you can talk into doing anything for you? If a book has 30 5-star reviews and a sprinkling of other ones, then I tend to assume most of them are honest.

You have to balance that out against the trolls who go around giving 1-star ratings with no review who haven't read the book. There are a number of "Goodreads librarians" who do this on a regular basis. When a person rates 30 books in a day, all 1-star with no reviews, and their profile is private, and they've done it over and over ... I've seen 1-star ratings for books that haven't been published yet, and the same "reviewer" has done the same thing to all of that author's books.

For me, I tend to read the 1-star reviews. If the reviewer doesn't like the book for reasons I probably wouldn't like the book, I pass it by. But I also buy a lot of books due to 1-star reviews because the reviewer is complaining about things I think I would like.

Besides, a lot of the 1-star reviews are hilarious."


Very true!


message 37: by Karma♥Bites ^.~ (last edited Apr 25, 2015 09:38PM) (new)

Karma♥Bites ^.~ (karma_bites) | 215 comments B.R. wrote: "...You have to balance that out against the trolls who go around giving 1-star ratings with no review who haven't read the book. ..."

IDK what you have against GR librarians; as one, I'm highly curious but shall refrain by posing a more relevant query:

I suppose that your 'troll' designation would equally apply to those who go around giving 5-star ratings w/ no review w/o having read the book, no?

(yeah, right)


ETA: Also, as someone w/ a private profile, I'm very curious as to how you can know so much about 'trolls' w/ private profiles, whether how & what they rate on any given day, much less on 'regular basis'. Such level of dedication to uncover such a pattern seems rather stalker-ish to me. But then, that's just me.


message 38: by Charles (new)

Charles Hash C'mon guys, tell us how you really feel.


message 39: by Sharon (new)

Sharon (fiona64) Shaun wrote: "I've been on this site less than a year, and have won a few books in giveaways. I *always* give a review for any book I receive in a giveaway. I guess I was naive to think that that was the norm. "

It's most definitely *not.* Out of all of the giveaways I have done, only *two* resulted in a review. In one case, the autographed paperback was next seen on eBay!


message 40: by Sharon (new)

Sharon (fiona64) I see two people who seriously need to let it go ... and I speak both as an author and a reviewer.


message 41: by Dwayne (new)

Dwayne Fry | 349 comments Dusty wrote: "Oh, and I would encourage any other authors out there to go to the review..."

Dusty, I would encourage you to just let it go. Writers cannot please everyone, so there's no use trying. Write what you want to write. You have some positive reviews. Don't let one negative one upset you so much.

Sometimes negative reviews can actually work in your favor. A negative review may say what that particular reviewer hated about your story, but maybe some potential buyer will be interested in whatever it is the reviewer didn't like. It happens.

Relax. Even Twain, Dickens, Shakespeare have people that hate their work. It happens to all of us.


message 42: by Andrea (new)

Andrea Jackson (paperbackdiva) | 108 comments Charles wrote: "As a highly ranked reviewer on Amazon, I receive many requests for reviews. Authors should understand that I never guarantee a review, my standard response is "I am interested in reviewing this boo..."

Thanks for the reminder, Charles. There are 'professional' reviewers and 'hobbyist' reviewers. Either way, it's a lot of work. In either case, I don't believe an author has the right to demand a review. It's rude. Giving your book to someone is not a contract for hire, unless both agree to it. That's not something that can be 'implied'.


message 43: by Mellie (new)

Mellie (mellie42) | 541 comments Dusty wrote: "If I were an author, and she was going to review my book, she would pay for it. "

Wow. Great way to present yourself as an author. This is why SPAs have a bad rep. It is also a sign you may have published too early, if you are going to make retaliatory threats over an honest review.


message 44: by BR (last edited Apr 26, 2015 06:44AM) (new)

BR Kingsolver (brkingsolver) | 36 comments Karma♥Bites ^.~ wrote: "B.R. wrote: "...You have to balance that out against the trolls who go around giving 1-star ratings with no review who haven't read the book. ..."

IDK what you have against GR librarians; as one, ..."



I don't have anything against GR librarians. I am very thankful for the work that they do and glad that their volunteer efforts make this such a pleasant place to interact with others and learn about and discuss books. I think that a few rotten apples are to be expected in any group as large as this. What I am not pleased with is the fact that GR ignores the bad behavior of some of them and refuses to correct the behavior and allows those people to continue abusing a position of trust.

And in answer to your question, yes, if anyone is giving a 5-star rating to a book they haven't read, that is also dishonest.


message 45: by Alexandra (new)

Alexandra | 340 comments Lokki wrote: "So, I have a question regarding reviews that are blatantly written by friends of the author wanting to do their buddy a favour by giving him or her a 5 star review. Do you feel these are actually ..."

Beneficial to the author to try to deceive consumers the book is better/more popular than it is? Nope.

And as you've pointed out these types of "reviews" are often pretty easy to spot either because they're just praise with no real info, or they read like ad copy.

I've also started ignoring ALL reviews posted by authors, unless an author is specifically known to me to post honest reviews. For exactly this reason.


message 46: by Alexandra (new)

Alexandra | 340 comments John wrote: " It is just not credible for a normal working person to read much more than a couple of books per week, on average. "

So presumptious. I'm a "normal working person". I work 40 hours a week, and often more.

I can, and often do, listen to audio books while I work. I also listen while doing housework, gardening, shopping in a massive Walmart, and many other things.

I can often "read" a book a day this way, and sometimes more.

You should be careful about your assumptions.


message 47: by S. (new)

S. Rivera (sjacksonrivera) | 47 comments Think of ourselves as a customer service rep. This is our store. This is our product, and no matter how unreasonable and down-right nasty the customer, plaster a smile on that face and see if we can make them happy. Not give them a reason to be even nastier.

Murphy's Law # 1,678: For every hundred readers who like your book, you might get 1 review, but for every 2 people who don't like your book, you can count on getting 2 reviews. Sucks but it's true.


message 48: by Alexandra (new)

Alexandra | 340 comments Cristine wrote: "Living next door to the author doesn't invalidate the review. Maybe those family and friend reviews are best for priming the reviewing pump. "

It may not invalidate the review, but relationship should be disclosed in the review. Otherwise it's undisclosed bias. Consumers deserve to know if the person is your mom or next door neighbor so THEY can decide, informed, what weight to give that review, not YOU.

And on Amazon it is against TOS for friends/family to post reviews.


message 49: by Alexandra (new)

Alexandra | 340 comments Dwayne wrote: "Sometimes negative reviews can actually work in your favor. A negative review may say what that particular reviewer hated about your story, but maybe some potential buyer will be interested in whatever it is the reviewer didn't like. It happens."

This is absolutely true. If the low rating is due to things the reviewer doesn't like in books, but I either don't mind or do like it can actually be just as helpful in helping me determine I may like a book as a positive review.

It works in reverse too. I've read MANY positive reviews that give me enough info about the story to know I'm not going to like the book.

Because (surprise, surprise) people have different tastes.


message 50: by Nospin (new)

Nospin John wrote: "Dear Sarah,
It is unfortunate that people asking for reviews annoys you, lots of things annoy me, but that would not be one of them.
You have the option to ignore the request, rejection is a famili..."


Are you for real?


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