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Archived Workshop No New Posts > To Blurb or not to Blurb?

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message 1: by Owen (new)

Owen O'Neill (owen_r_oneill) | 1509 comments Recently I have been thinking about blurbs. Like many authors, writing blurbs is something I find difficult and unpleasant. Blurbs have a long history in publishing -- some of my sci-fi from the 70's has blurbs on the back cover. (The more recent books mostly have reviews.) Some books put a brief excerpt on the back cover and some put one inside the front cover. Some do neither. So there have been differing opinions in the past on how to best entice a reader to consider buying a book.

These days, it seems to be pretty much the blurb that is supposed to entice the reader to go farther. (I'm disregarding the cover here, as that's almost always a first step.) My question is: do people, as readers, really find blurbs that enticing, or is it just what we are given?

What about a short excerpt in place of the blurb? That would be easier on us authors and it would get our writing right in front of the customer, without going through the extra step of reading the sample (which a surprising number people seem to neglect in make their purchase decision). Also, the author can pick it, unlike the sample which the outlet selects (the first 10% on Amazon KDP).

But as a reader, would it entice you or not? What are the drawbacks? Are readers addicted to blurbs and likely to be put off by more text? (I have seen many blurbs that are quite long.)

If it would help, I can post links to the blurbs for our next two novels, along with an excerpt from each, by way of concrete examples. But they are military sci-fi (one more so than the other), which may not make the best examples, so I’ll refrain for the moment.

Please weigh in if you have an opinion, and if anyone has tried this approach and has insight they wish to share, that would be enlightening. Also, do mention which[s] genre applies to your input. Readers in different genres will very likely respond differently on this issue. Like just about everything in publishing, I doubt there is a one-size-fits-all answer.


message 2: by Rachael (last edited Apr 24, 2015 02:40AM) (new)

Rachael Eyre (rachaeleyre) | 192 comments Personally I'd plump for the blurb. Having an excerpt divorced from its context seems odd - while I've occasionally bought books I've heard on the radio, I wouldn't necessarily based on the one extract. Readers like to know what they're getting; while distilling the bare bones of the plot may be hard, it allows them to read on or walk away. It's even more crucial to the success of your book than a cover - sometimes you see a brilliant cover but fail to be similarly wowed by the blurb.


message 3: by Owen (last edited Apr 24, 2015 03:30AM) (new)

Owen O'Neill (owen_r_oneill) | 1509 comments Rachael wrote: "Personally I'd plump for the blurb. Having an excerpt divorced from its context seems odd - while I've occasionally bought books I've heard on the radio, I wouldn't necessarily based on the one ext..."

Thanks Rachel. It definitely a two-step process: cover and then blurb, or whatever, with the cover becoming OBE at that point. I'm at handicap here because I never consider the blurb -- I assume it's been written to manipulate me and is therefore suspect -- except in a negative sense. If I do look at it, and it's particularly badly written (or has typos), I'll dismiss the work out of hand. But most often I go straight to the sample. So a "good" blurb is hard for me to get my head around.

Do you have any links to blurbs that you found personally effective? That is, they were a main factor in deciding to buy a book?


message 4: by Owen (new)

Owen O'Neill (owen_r_oneill) | 1509 comments Rob wrote: "The only alternative to blurbs I've seen thou..."

Thanks, Rob. Can you point me to any examples?


message 5: by Uma (new)

Uma (witcheyez) | 37 comments I wish I didn't have to blurb, but I think I need it in order for readers to know what my debut book is all about. Writing a blurb is so freaking DIFFICULT!

On the other hand, I like picking up books that tell me a little something about the story. Which means, I like blurbs!


message 6: by Owen (new)

Owen O'Neill (owen_r_oneill) | 1509 comments Uma wrote: "On the other hand, I like picking up books that tell me a little something about the story. Which means, I like blurbs!"

Thanks Uma. I see your book gets rave reviews!

I'll ask a slightly different question, if I may. Do you feel that there is a short section in your book (less than a page) that adquately illustrates the crux of your book -- be that a character, the nature of the central conflict, or whatever single you'd like to convey to the reader?


message 7: by G.G. (new)

G.G. (ggatcheson) | 2491 comments I like blurbs. When I see praises from third parties, I skip it. I don't want to know what others think. I want to know what the story is about. Then if I'm interested I might check reviews, but never those shown on a book cover.


message 8: by Uma (new)

Uma (witcheyez) | 37 comments Owen, now you've got me thinking. I think I should have something like that. Do you reckon putting that at the back would be better?


message 9: by Charles (new)

Charles Hash | 1054 comments If I were good at selling myself I would have been a politician. :\

And that's what a good blurb does, it sells your material. But I can't remember the last time I decided to read a book based on a blurb. I definitely have to read a little of the text on top of it.


message 10: by Iffix (last edited Apr 24, 2015 06:10AM) (new)

Iffix Santaph | 324 comments Owen wrote: "Uma wrote: "On the other hand, I like picking up books that tell me a little something about the story. Which means, I like blurbs!"

Thanks Uma. I see your book gets rave reviews!

I'll ask a sli..."

I have one passage from my current WIP that almost defines the book itself. But, as you saw a few days ago, Owen, I would rather go with the blurb. It just seems like a personal connection with the reader in mind, as if someone asked personally, "what's this thing about"? You wouldn't answer with an excerpt. You'd do your best to win them over. G.G. told me the other day, "you had me at alien", so I must have chosen correctly. :D


message 11: by L.F. (new)

L.F. Falconer | 63 comments No one likes to write blurbs...it's so hard to summarize an entire novel in a few short paragraphs and keep it exciting. An agent I met at the writer's group I belong to gave this advice: "Start with a bang, fill in the middle with energetic summary and close with an open ending/cliffhanger. Think conflict, think drama, think human appeal." Just a few pointers to help guide us along :)


message 12: by Uma (new)

Uma (witcheyez) | 37 comments When someone asks me what's my book about, I always say: "It's about a girl."

I end up receiving the are-you-kidding-me look! I kid you not!

I had 2 blurbs written and went with the 2nd one first. Then just 2 weeks ago, I decided to go with the 1st one. And... I'm still not satisfied.

I know blurbs are important to most readers (myself included) and yet, I'm unable to write the perfect one. But Owen, you've made me want to check out if a passage from my book can make it as a blurb.


message 13: by Iffix (new)

Iffix Santaph | 324 comments I'm totally going with that one for the back of my next novel. "It's about a girl." I think that's the tagline I've been looking for. (Don't worry. I'll credit you on the back.) >:)


message 14: by Uma (new)

Uma (witcheyez) | 37 comments Iffix wrote: "I'm totally going with that one for the back of my next novel. "It's about a girl." I think that's the tagline I've been looking for. (Don't worry. I'll credit you on the back.) >:)"

Hahahaha... The pleasure is all mine :-)


message 15: by Owen (last edited Apr 24, 2015 06:36AM) (new)

Owen O'Neill (owen_r_oneill) | 1509 comments Uma wrote: "I know blurbs are important to most readers (myself included) and yet, I'm unable to write the perfect one. But Owen, you've made me want to check out if a passage from my book can make it as a blurb."

One of the things that got me thinking about this (besides what a pain they are) is that blurbs seem to be so similar. (I mean the blurbs I read on Big 5 published books as well as indie.) When you squish the plot into a short blurb, how so you make it sound unique? Genres are largely defined by plot, thus the plots tend to sound the same when reduced to their essentials.

So yes, I would think pulling something directly from your book -- if you can -- would make it stand out.

Did you notice any difference when you changed blurbs? (True, two weeks is not a long time.)


message 16: by Uma (new)

Uma (witcheyez) | 37 comments Owen wrote: "Uma wrote: "I know blurbs are important to most readers (myself included) and yet, I'm unable to write the perfect one. But Owen, you've made me want to check out if a passage from my book can make..."

I suppose the 1st blurb was more vague and didn't give away anything. I only mentioned one character's name (the girl). In the 2nd blurb, I mentioned two characters' names.

And you're right about blurbs being similar. But if taken directly from the book, it's going to be totally different.


message 17: by Philip (new)

Philip Dodd (philipdodd) | 32 comments Certainly, the back cover of a book looks better with a blurb than quotes from reviewers. I read recently that a good way of enticing readers to read your book is to ask questions in your blurb. Questions may intrigue readers and create a desire in them to have them answered, and the only way they will be is to read the book, no doubt. It is something J.K. Rowling did in her blurb for her book, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: "Harry is waiting in Private Drive. The Order of the Phoenix is coming to escort him safely away without Voldemort and his supporters knowing - if they can. But what will Harry do then? How can he fulfil the momentous and seemingly impossible task that Professor Dumbledore has left him?"
That is the complete blurb. I think it is effective, mostly because of the two questions that bring its end. Only by reading the book can they be answered. In the blurb on the back cover of my new book, I decided to follow the advice I had read, made it less than one hundred and fifty words long, and ended it with two questions. Writing a blurb is the prose equivalent of writing a haiku poem, condensing a great matter into a few memorable lines. It is a good exercise, I think, and one worth doing.


message 18: by Christina (new)

Christina McMullen (cmcmullen) First the disclosure: I am not your typical reader and since becoming active with Goodreads indie groups, the time I spend browsing for books had diminished to nearly none.

First, I look at the blurb without reading. I look at the length and skim for words that pique my interest. If I find them, I buy the book.
What will cause me to skip a book: excerpts or third party praise in place of a simple description.

More disclosure: I browse the free section and I intentionally look for books without reviews, especially those that have been on the market for a while because I do not hold the belief that books without reviews are automatically bad.

Now, if I'm looking to pay for a book, say, because I met an author here and their book sounded interesting, I'm not even going to skim the blurb. I'm going straight for the look inside feature.


message 19: by Owen (new)

Owen O'Neill (owen_r_oneill) | 1509 comments Christina wrote: "What will cause me to skip a book: excerpts or third party praise in place of a simple description..."

So if you see an excerpt from the book, instead of a description of book, that's a rejection? Mind if I ask what's the negative message using an excerpt sends? (Since I'm not typical either, tend to feel the opposite way.)


message 20: by Christina (new)

Christina McMullen (cmcmullen) Because to me, it's lazy hubris. It's the author saying, "My work is so good, it speaks for itself. Look! Read! Why should I have to lower myself to summarizing it for you when all you have to do is gaze upon its wonder?"

Yes, I am exaggerating slightly, but that's the gist and given that there is a sample available to read, it seems redundant.

Back in the old days, publishers used to put an excerpt at the beginning of the book. One of two things happened: either I read it and was very confused when the next page had a title, or I was old enough to know what it was and skipped it.


message 21: by Igzy (new)

Igzy Dewitt (IgzyDewitt) | 148 comments If I am unfamiliar with the author of a book I generally go through the following steps.

1) Be caught by the cover/title
2) Check to see if I recognize any of the authors who reviewed for the dust-jacket
3) go to the blurb to see what it's all about.

If there is no blurb on the back of the book I'll start reading through the first chapter to get a sense of the author's writing, but the blurb can cut out a step for me. If the general idea in the blurb catches my interest that can lead to an impulse buy on my part.


message 22: by Owen (new)

Owen O'Neill (owen_r_oneill) | 1509 comments Christina wrote: "Because to me, it's lazy hubris. It's the author saying, "My work is so good, it speaks for itself. Look! Read! Why should I have to lower myself to summarizing it for you when all you have to do i..."

Thanks -- that's very interesting. Personally, I've always felt a writer's work does speak for itself, because I look at it the same way I consider music. If I went to a musician and asked what their work sounded like and they told me, I'd be really puzzled. Just let me hear some! I don't care what they think it sounds like. Their music speaks for itself.

That is probably because I care very much about prose and very little about plot. If the writing is dry or inferior, I won't get past a page no matter what. If the writing is brilliant, I don't care about the plot. I'll read for the pure sensual experience of reading. So I guess for me, the music thing is very apt. (And if an author's writing is dry of dull, his characters to me are dry and dull, same as the plot.)

If plot matters, though, I can see your point, since an excerpt will rarely convey much there. So a blurb makes sense.

Now on blurbs, I give indie authors more slack because they usually write their own blurbs. For traditionally published work, someone else writes the blurb. In that case, the blurb is suspect to me. Sure it may be catchy -- if they did their job, it will be -- but I can't assume it is faithful. (In fact, it's been the opposite in every case I can recall.)

So if the current state of affairs accurately reflects readers’ taste, my perspective is a rare. Excellent! I think I'm getting an answer here. :-)


message 23: by Dwayne, Head of Lettuce (last edited Apr 24, 2015 08:13AM) (new)

Dwayne Fry | 4270 comments Mod
Owen wrote: "Blurbs."

Blurb blurb blurb
Blurb is the word
Well, don't you know about the blurb
Everybody's talkin' about the blurb!


I tried that joke on another group here in Goodreads and all I got were cricket chips. You guys are cool. You guys are nice. You'll laugh.

Laugh. Now.

Anyway.

As a writer... I hate blurbs. I hate writing them. I hate thinking about them. I told Charles Hash the other day I wish I could just write, "Buy my damned book. You'll like it." as my blurb. I am very tempted to try this.

I hate writing them because a lot of my stories have twists and turns and things you don't fully understand until the end. It's hard to sum up the point of the story and not give a lot away.

I also hate them because, yeah, I can write "Daniel Pellegrino has just broken up with his girlfriend of seven years and is going cross country to find a new life with a friend he barely knows" but BIG DEAL! Yes, that sums up one of my stories in one sentence, but to me it says nothing. Who is Daniel? Why would I care about him or his ex-girlfriend? My stories are more character driven than plot driven, so when written as a blurb, they sound dull.

As a reader... I hate blurbs. Nothing sells or breaks a story for me like reading a few pages. The cover may be nice, but I don't pay much attention. The blurb may be golden, but I probably won't read it. It's the story that I'm buying. It's the story that will sell itself to me, or not.


message 24: by Iffix (new)

Iffix Santaph | 324 comments I laughed. It was quite good actually. (I think it would have been better though if you posted a video of yourself singing it.)


message 25: by Dwayne, Head of Lettuce (new)

Dwayne Fry | 4270 comments Mod
V.M. wrote: "Well Dwayne, I'm sure one of us who's read your book can offer you a blurb. Sometimes its the reviewers who come up with the best ones!"

If you or anyone else here that have read any of my stories want to give it a shot, go for it. I'm 99.9% confident you could come up with a better blurb than I.

With your eyes closed.

And both hands tied behind your back.


message 26: by Dwayne, Head of Lettuce (new)

Dwayne Fry | 4270 comments Mod
Iffix wrote: "...I think it would have been better though if you posted a video of yourself singing it.)"

But, I don't want to be kicked out of the group for damaging ear drums.


message 27: by Barbara (new)

Barbara | 3 comments The main reason I buy a book is the blurb. If a book didn't have a blurb I wouldn't read it. BUT, I don't want to know too much about the book. I have read blurbs with so much information I felt like I already read the book so I didn't buy it.

The steps I go through to buy a book:
1. Title.
2. Cover design.
3. Blurb.
4. Read the first page and see if the writing is good.
5. Reviews.

If I hear about a book on a blog that is recommended by an author I'll see if I'm interested, but I don't automatically buy books because the author I like recommended it. I still go through the same process as I would for any other author.


message 28: by G.G. (new)

G.G. (ggatcheson) | 2491 comments Oh I forgot to say, as if writing a blurb wasn't scary enough, as a reader if I see a huge block of a blurb, I'll most likely turn away without even looking at anything else.

Nothing like being assaulted by a wall of words, no paragraph, nothing. It makes me wonder what the rest of the book may look like. Between the two evils, too short or block, I'll choose the first one without even blinking twice.

And yes, Iffix, it sure worked for me. :)


message 29: by Owen (last edited Apr 24, 2015 09:02AM) (new)

Owen O'Neill (owen_r_oneill) | 1509 comments Dwayne wrote: "I also hate them because, yeah, I can write "Daniel Pellegrino has just broken up with his girlfriend of seven years and is going cross country to find a new life with a friend he barely knows" but BIG DEAL!..."

Just to indulge myself a teeny bit, I should say that there could be a blurb that would get my attention, but the intellectual phase-locking that goes on is deadly. How many times does one read about "dark secrets" relating to things that are "not what they seem" (even I used that one) threatening to destroy [something major]. Can so & so survive/rescue the princess or whatever?

Now I don't mean to get down on those plots because those pretty much define what a plot is (adjust for genre), so if one or more of those things is not present, what are we left with? Looked at another way, specify the genre and that tends to specify almost a "default" blurb, so to speak. Point being, those kinds of decriptions don't give me a way to tell if I should care who lives and who dies in the story.

So I too, have thought of a blurb like: "Buy this book..." although what I actually thought of was this (because I was in that sort of mood):
Listen what readers are saying!
"... extol its lasciviousness."
"... surpasses that which my digestive track can sustain."
"... my palette wasn't so much offended as it was tainted."
"... whatever you consume is who you become."

And even:
"Hauntingly, beautifully written..."
"High fantasy at its best."
(Of course, you'll want to ignore those last two.)
* * *
I dunno? Would that work? Otherwise, I'm thinking it's back thrashing out blurbs.

Edit: I should clarify that I really don't think it's an either/or situation. One of my favorite quotes is: "Not the path to victory, but all paths to victory."


message 30: by G.G. (new)

G.G. (ggatcheson) | 2491 comments Dwayne wrote: "Iffix wrote: "...I think it would have been better though if you posted a video of yourself singing it.)"

But, I don't want to be kicked out of the group for damaging ear drums."


ROFL!


message 31: by Dwayne, Head of Lettuce (new)

Dwayne Fry | 4270 comments Mod
Owen wrote: "How many times does one read about "dark secrets"..."

A good reason I hate reading blurbs. They all seem to say the same thing with too many overly used phrases like "dark secrets" and "only ... can stop the menace of ... " I like reading stories that stand off to the side as lone wolves. Blurbs often make even the best stories sound like just another dog in the pack.


message 32: by Owen (new)

Owen O'Neill (owen_r_oneill) | 1509 comments Dwayne wrote: "Owen wrote: "How many times does one read about "dark secrets"..."

I'd love to see a histogram of such phrases. That could certainly be a tool for writing better blurbs (and maybe better stories?)


message 33: by Owen (new)

Owen O'Neill (owen_r_oneill) | 1509 comments V.M. wrote: "These may contain some of the cliches, but might also have some useful advice as well. I submit these for you guys to look over: ..."

Is there a place under Author Resources to archive those links? (There are links to some useful blogs I've seen on here too, but can longer locate.) Not that I want to make more work for you guys.


message 34: by Courtney (new)

Courtney Wells | 138 comments My two-cents on what makes me auto-pass on a book because a blurb turned me off:

- Third-party reviews praising the story's brilliance and author's rare talent. If the book/author are so sensational, why isn't the story selling itself? It makes me feel like I'm being manipulated into jumping on a bandwagon.

- "Candid" assurance assuring/guaranteeing me how much a book will make me laugh, cry, recoil in horror - whatever genre it's selling. This is worse than a bandwagon - makes me feel feel like I'm being lead into a van with promises of candy.

- Trumped up character descriptions assuring me how feisty, rebellious, sexy and other generic adjectives about people the book. It makes me worried they're depending heavily on tropes and gimmicks.

- Blocks and blocks explaining beats of action and twists I can anticipate. Why an author would spoiler a third of their book for readers is beyond me. It's far better to explain the premise, be coy, hint at mystery and probably reveal nothing that isn't apparent in the first chapter.

Basically if a blurb is two-three paragraphs, sticking to the story itself and doesn't make me feel like I read half the book already it is something I'll consider :)


message 35: by Christina (new)

Christina McMullen (cmcmullen) Hm...
I'm considering the Nickleback approach now. Write a blurb that uses all of the catchy hooks that have been overused in the past and watch as people hate, yet keep buying my books...
:D


message 36: by Courtney (new)

Courtney Wells | 138 comments "Twilight meets Call of Duty - follow our feisty heroine as she rebels with her sexy, mysterious man in ways that will leave you breathless while panting for more"


message 37: by Anthony Deeney (new)

Anthony Deeney | 437 comments Owen wrote: "Dwayne wrote: "Owen wrote: "How many times does one read about "dark secrets"..."

I'd love to see a histogram of such phrases. That could certainly be a tool for writing better blurbs (and maybe b..."


I'll bet the professional have such a bank of phrases. They'll have a tried and tested formula and stock phrases that sell again and again.

Us indies are just reinventing the wheel!


message 38: by Quoleena (last edited Apr 24, 2015 01:25PM) (new)

Quoleena Sbrocca (qjsbrocca) Christina wrote: "Hm...
I'm considering the Nickleback approach now. Write a blurb that uses all of the catchy hooks that have been overused in the past and watch as people hate, yet keep buying my books...
:D"


hahaha! So that's why I know a bunch of their songs but am embarrassed by the fact that I do. Well, at least I've only downloaded one of their songs. Or have I? Can't recall.


message 39: by Iffix (new)

Iffix Santaph | 324 comments @Rob, that's a darn good idea.


message 40: by Mark (last edited Apr 24, 2015 04:01PM) (new)

Mark Purifoy | 10 comments I think blurbs are very important when it comes to a customer buying the book. The most important parts to me are the book cover, the description of the book, and the book's content itself. It is the cover that draws me to the book, the description of it that gets me to read the book, and the content inside the that decides whether I liked or hated the book. It can be very difficult to come up with a blurb--I had trouble with coming up with one, too--but I believe it's important to have one.


message 41: by Owen (new)

Owen O'Neill (owen_r_oneill) | 1509 comments Courtney wrote: ""Twilight meets Call of Duty - follow our feisty heroine as she rebels with her sexy, mysterious man in ways that will leave you breathless while panting for more""

Blast & Darnation! Why didn't I think of that! If you write that, I think your fortune may be secure.


message 42: by Uma (last edited Apr 24, 2015 07:01PM) (new)

Uma (witcheyez) | 37 comments Philip wrote: "Certainly, the back cover of a book looks better with a blurb than quotes from reviewers. I read recently that a good way of enticing readers to read your book is to ask questions in your blurb. Qu..."

I think I'm going to try and give this a shot. My blurb still feels... incomplete! It feels mundane.. I am my own critic... sigh..


message 43: by Melissa (new)

Melissa Jensen (kdragon) | 468 comments My two cents is that I like to have at least an idea of what I'm about to read before I read it, which is why books without blurbs, only reviewer praise, annoy me. It makes me feel like the author has something to hide.

That said, yeah, I kind of wish we didn't have to write blurbs. I've read blurbs that were flatter than a piece of paper or the poster child of cliches that had me bored two sentences in... and yet the book was a best seller! Which then makes me think that if that crappy blurb can sell a book then I should be able to come up with an even better blurb. Only to end up coming up with something worse.

I love a challenge, but blurbs are more a necessary nightmare.


message 44: by Melissa (new)

Melissa Jensen (kdragon) | 468 comments Owen wrote: "Courtney wrote: ""Twilight meets Call of Duty - follow our feisty heroine as she rebels with her sexy, mysterious man in ways that will leave you breathless while panting for more""

Blast & Darnat..."


I would totally read that :D


message 45: by Uma (new)

Uma (witcheyez) | 37 comments Writing a blurb = Nightmare on Elm Street!


message 46: by Melissa (new)

Melissa Jensen (kdragon) | 468 comments I once read a story in which a person's personal hell was a library full of books that didn't have an ending. A writer's hell would be a library full of books in need of blurbs and you have to write them... and write them well. Mwhahahahahahaha!


message 47: by Owen (new)

Owen O'Neill (owen_r_oneill) | 1509 comments Melissa wrote: "Which then makes me think that if that crappy blurb can sell a book then I should be able to come up with an even better blurb..."

My feeling on this is that bestsellers tend to be in a different category. Most trad-published bestselling authors made their name back before the industry was revolutionized. I doubt anyone cares what blurb they out on GRRM's books now or (back when she was stilling writing them) the Harry Potter series.

Once an author has an established reputation, I think the blurb serves a different purpose than an indie author trying to get noticed. Thus, I question using blurbs on successful authors' books as input -- those blurbs are not what made them successful in the first place. And they may have become successful under a different paradigm.

So I think we need to find our own way here. The paths to success now are different than they were 10 -- even 5 -- years ago. We might easily follow the "footsteps of giants" right into a blind alley or a dead end (Caution: Road Closed!)


message 48: by Courtney (new)

Courtney Wells | 138 comments Wow - who knew I had such a knack for writing irresistible blurbs. Now I'm wondering if superpowered, gorgeous vampires who are made of living stone doing covert missions at 100 miles an hour is what America is crying out for.

Or - dare I say - the world?


message 49: by Owen (new)

Owen O'Neill (owen_r_oneill) | 1509 comments Courtney wrote: "Wow - who knew I had such a knack for writing irresistible blurbs. Now I'm wondering if superpowered, gorgeous vampires who are made of living stone doing covert missions at 100 miles an hour is..."

That one I think you sell to HBO.

And it's gotta have crypto-nazis and spiffily dressed gangsters, with a headquarters in catacombs beneath an abandoned, haunted cathedral in Budapest. Since the vampires are living stone, they can morph into gargoyles as cover.


message 50: by Courtney (new)

Courtney Wells | 138 comments This sounds amazing. You toss in some carnies and a flapper doing the Jitter Bug and I see no reason why this couldn't get a Newbery medal.


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