Of Mice and Men Of Mice and Men discussion


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Of Mice and Men

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message 1: by Angie (new)

Angie Stadler The book Of Mice and Men is a classic. You will find a story of two hard working characters who travel everywhere together. They always have each other backs. George, which is one of the main characters, takes care of Lennie. Lennie is 100% on George for a very special reason, Lennie has a mental disability. Throughout this book you will smile, laugh, and see the overall loneliness of each character trying to find someone to stay with them throughout.


Amber I really enjoyed this book also. I agree agree with your description about their loneliness.


message 3: by M. (new) - rated it 4 stars

M. Purkiss I studied this book in school. I did like it but as I was studying it, I found it boring at times. Saying that, after my studying, I picked it up again and loved it. A must read


Patrick Kelly I liked it for a different reason. As I was studying about the conscious and subconsicous mind, George and Lennie were a perfect metaphor. George for the thinking conscious mind and Lennie for the much stronger but unreasoning subconscious mind.


message 5: by Feliks (last edited Nov 04, 2015 08:13PM) (new) - rated it 3 stars

Feliks I like the sub-plot about the dog, best. Makes my blood boil.


message 6: by Dmitry (last edited Nov 26, 2015 07:33AM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Dmitry Voznuk Besides of the loneliness and shattered dreams in that book I love line about responsibility for those who tamed (I didn't read "The Little Prince", shame on me, but from there is a saying "We are responsible for those who tamed"). In the book, this proverb twice gets the cruel display.


Monty J Heying Дмитрий wrote: " I love line about responsibility for those who tamed..."


I don't understand. Please elaborate.
Thank you


Monty J Heying Feliks wrote: "I like the sub-plot about the dog, best. Makes my blood boil."

Yup. The dog's dream got smashed along with the dreams of Curley's wife, Lennie, Candy and George.


Dmitry Voznuk Monty J wrote: "Дмитрий wrote: " I love line about responsibility for those who tamed..."

I don't understand. Please elaborate.
Thank you"

After Carlson killed Candy's dog, Candy said that is he must to kill the dog. He understood that dog suffered, but hadn't the strength to put the end to dog's life. And when Lennie almost was caught, George killed him for he wasn't been tortured and killed. He takes responsibility of Lennie's fate. This is cruel and ambivalent approach, but it somehow instructive.


message 10: by Monty J (last edited Nov 30, 2015 09:30AM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Monty J Heying Dmitry wrote: "After Carlson killed Candy's dog, Candy said that is he must to kill the dog. He understood that dog suffered, but hadn't the strength to put the end to dog's life."

I get it now. Yes, Candy said, "He is mine. I shouldn'ta let someone else do it." (or words to that effect.)

It is an important point--accepting responsibility for the humane treatment of our weaker fellow beings--the aged, infirm and mentally ill. The dog trusts Candy, and love is an extension of trust. The dog is suffering, so Candy, who loves him (and is reciprocally loved by the dog) bears the responsibility to relieve his suffering.

Group responsibility and strength extend from this concept.


There's an implicit hierarchy. The one closest bears the most responsibility, and when they fail, responsibility flows to someone else. Carlson stepped up to the responsibility for the dog because Candy would (or could) not. Candy was not strong enough. Slim, the ostensible group leader, approved Carlson's decision.

Lennie was a responsibility George had assumed out of compassion, which grew over time into love. Lennie trusted George the way the dog trusted Candy. It was George's responsibility to prevent Lennie's suffering (and protect society in general from Lennie's potential threat.)


message 11: by Greg (new) - rated it 1 star

Greg For everyone, I have a question. At that time, was there no program in place to offer assistance to people with mental illnesses? It seems like there would have been, perhaps not a good place.


Geoffrey Greg wrote: "For everyone, I have a question. At that time, was there no program in place to offer assistance to people with mental illnesses? It seems like there would have been, perhaps not a good place."

This was back in the 30´s my goodness. We didn´t have the complete socialist state in place by then.


Edwin Stratton-Mackay I thought Steinbeck's book was much better than Walt Disney's 1946 cartoon version: "Lonesome Lenny." The Disney studios seemed to lack the class-consciousness of the original text.


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