Support for Indie Authors discussion

22 views
Archived Author Help > Free guide: The Thriller Formula

Comments Showing 1-10 of 10 (10 new)    post a comment »
dateDown arrow    newest »

message 1: by Eden (new)

Eden Sharp | 3 comments Have you ever wanted to write a thriller? Want to know how? In this free guide, designed for those new to thriller writing, you will learn how to breakdown a seemingly overwhelming task into 8 distinctive sections that act as a blueprint so you’ll always know what to write next and where your story must go in order to meet readers’ expectations of the genre.

In this way, you will be following the structure of many of Hollywood’s blockbusting movies and the way this is translated into the thrillers written by your favourite authors you are reading and enjoying. You’ll learn exactly the format these successful thrillers follow that heightens readers’ emotions, takes them on a rollercoasting, page-turning thrill-ride, builds to an exciting climax, and leaves the reader absorbed to the end fully satisfied by the experience. This is the formula that has been so finely honed by Hollywood, and the greatest thrillers have it. Quite simply, it works.

Grab a free copy here: bit.ly/1HZWdaK


message 2: by Peter (new)

Peter (74765525) | 19 comments I'm not saying your guide is not good, but IMHO the very best guide to writing thrillers is to write them. Reading a few from time to time may help, but most people learn by doing rather than being told what to do. Think of learning how to drive. Didn't you have to get behind the wheel before most of what you were taught made any sense. And while you don't want to make mistakes while driving, there's nothing wrong with making mistakes while learning how to write. The more stories you attempt to write, even if you get stuck or don't finish them, the better you'll become when you finally find that one story that has all the elements to be a success. Write people, write.


message 3: by Courtney (new)

Courtney Wells | 138 comments Absolutely, everyone has to eventually just write for themselves but for those just starting out or switching genres it always helps to understand the fundamentals - like staple tropes or a jumping off point to build ideas off of.

When I was first getting serious about writing novels I bought a couple guides discussing structuring because simply reading books in a specific doesn't always help someone develop a sense of the nuance necessary for writing one. Just like somebody might take a class or writing workshop.

I think it might benefit somebody to see how something is done and expand on that. It could help them avoid false starts or - worse - completing an entire novel that doesn't match the genre it's aspiring towards.


message 4: by Eden (new)

Eden Sharp | 3 comments Great comments. As a university lecturer I agree. The best way to learn how to write is to write. But for emerging writers understanding a genre is fundamental!


message 5: by Peter (new)

Peter (74765525) | 19 comments I think we're on the same page. I've found reading books, taking classes, going to conferences, etc. very helpful, but the more I write the more helpful those things become. I have also learned a great deal about my writing by being part of a critique group. Reading critically has been very valuable to me and I assume others and getting feedback from other writers is also invaluable.


message 6: by Courtney (new)

Courtney Wells | 138 comments I think some authors struggle because they make too quick a transition from avid reader to professional writer.

Nothing in life is so simple that you can start producing a professional quality of anything simply by consuming professional products. It would be like thinking you could become a 5 star chef just by eating 5 star cuisine. It's hard to recreate anything quality by taste alone. No more than you could direct a film just because you watch a lot of movies.

That has always been something I felt happened when I read lackluster self-published books. Like someone read a lot of a genre and loved it but only ended up creating a mishmash or tepid version of more recognizable works. Wanting to tell a story is fantastic but knowing how to tell one isn't something you can always pick up from reading.


message 7: by Dwayne, Head of Lettuce (new)

Dwayne Fry | 4282 comments Mod
Courtney wrote: "That has always been something I felt happened when I read lackluster self-published books."

It happens in traditionally published books, too.


message 8: by Courtney (new)

Courtney Wells | 138 comments True, but with self-published there's no agent to reject jarring amateur or disjointed stories or accredited to fine tune anybody's best effort. Self-publishing is a wing and a prayer of authors being self-disciplined and self-critical.

I wish my track record as a reader was different but I would say 4/5 self-published novels I've read weren't the same quality or competency I've seen from traditionally publishing novels. But that's just my experience, not a rule :)


message 9: by Dwayne, Head of Lettuce (new)

Dwayne Fry | 4282 comments Mod
Courtney wrote: "True, but with self-published there's no agent to reject jarring amateur or disjointed stories or accredited to fine tune anybody's best effort. Self-publishing is a wing and a prayer of authors being self-disciplined and self-critical."

I agree that all authors need to learn to be self-critical and self-disciplined. I have read some crap work by self-published authors, but nothing worse than I've read by some traditionally published. I'm hoping that this group and others like it will help to make newer authors fall in love with the craft and the language so they're not just writing "See Dick run" and thinking it's literature.


message 10: by Courtney (new)

Courtney Wells | 138 comments Agreed wholeheartedly.


back to top