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MILITARY - IRAQ/AFGHANISTAN > IRAQI FREEDOM (03/19/2003)

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message 1: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 35741 comments Mod
This is a thread devoted to the discussion of the war called IRAQI FREEDOM (the current conflict)(people, locations, events, books and other publications, battles, historic sites, maps, research information, urls, etc.)

Please feel free to add any and all discussion information related to this topic area in this thread.

Bentley


message 2: by 'Aussie Rick' (new)

'Aussie Rick' (AussieRick) 'Aussie Rick' here, I again must confess to having an interest in this area of conflict and have purchased/amassed around twenty to thirty books on this conflict. I have only read a few to date but these have been my favourites so far:

Imperial Life in the Emerald City Inside Baghdad's Green Zone by Rajiv Chandrasekaran by Rajiv Chandrasekaran The Prince of the Marshes And Other Occupational Hazards of a Year in Iraq by Rory Stewart by Rory Stewart House to House A Tale of Modern War by David Bellavia by David Bellavia

Fiasco The American Military Adventure in Iraq by Thomas E. Ricks and The Gamble General David Petraeus and the American Military Adventure in Iraq, 2006-2008 by Thomas E. Ricks by Thomas E. Ricks

We Were One Shoulder to Shoulder With the Marines Who Took Fallujah by Patrick K. O'Donnell by Patrick K. O'Donnell The Forever War by Dexter Filkins by Dexter Filkins


message 3: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 35741 comments Mod
Thank you Rick for starting to add to this thread. I was certainly looking for some recommendations on this subject.


message 4: by Harvey (new)

Harvey | 286 comments Interesting topic; I have spent twenty years in Kuwait plus a trip to Basra so I have more than an armchair view on Iraq. Not to criticise book recommendations, but I have some views if anyone wants to throw a thesis around.....


message 5: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 35741 comments Mod
By all means Harvey..please add some recommendations and let us know your views on some of the books. It is very helpful to gain and blend different perspectives.


message 6: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited Jan 25, 2010 07:47AM) (new)

Bentley | 35741 comments Mod
This is a personal tribute being made by an artist:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/in_depth/8...

Audio slideshow: Portraits of the fallen

Distinctive portraits of British, US and Canadian service personnel killed in Iraq and Afghanistan - created by artist Michael Reagan - have gone on display at Arlington National Cemetery near Washington DC.

A Vietnam War veteran himself, he has produced more than 2,000 drawings for the soldiers' families free of charge. He told BBC Radio 4's PM programme he wants to document all of the Allied troops killed in action.



message 7: by 'Aussie Rick' (new)

'Aussie Rick' (AussieRick) Bentley wrote: "This is a personal tribute being made by an artist:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/in_depth/8...

Audio slideshow: Portraits of the fallen

Distinctive portraits of British, US and Canadian ser..."


Thanks Bentley for this link, its touching, saddening and also uplifting. Michael Reagan has done a great thing for many people and I hope it helps those who have lost loved ones in these conflicts.


message 8: by 'Aussie Rick' (new)

'Aussie Rick' (AussieRick) The author Mark Urban who has previously published books on the War in Ireland, the SAS and some nice books covering the Napoleonic Wars has just released this new title:

[image error] by Mark Urban
Publishers blurb:
"When British and American forces invaded Iraq in April 2003, their intelligence operations got to work looking for the WMD their governments had promised us were there. They quickly realised no such weapons existed. Instead they become faced with an ever-increasing spiral of extremism and violence that was almost impossible to understand, let alone contain. This book tells the story of what happened next, one of the most dramatic and sustained operations in our recent military history. Up against the wall, under the aegis of the joint forces commanded by Major General McChrystal, our men moved into action using the wide variety of aircraft and weaponry at their disposal. Combining intelligence with brute force, the SAS went on the attack, night after night targeting Al-Qaeda and other insurgent groups with an intensity never before practiced by the service, destroying the terrorist threat and saving lives."


message 9: by 'Aussie Rick' (new)

'Aussie Rick' (AussieRick) Two new books covering one of the bloodier battles during this conflict is: "Operation Phantom Fury: The Assault and Capture of Fallujah, Iraq" by Dick Camp and "New Dawn: The Battles for Fallujah" by Richard S. Lowry (May 2010).

[image error] by Dick Camp

[image error] by Richard S. Lowry
Review:
"In New Dawn, Richard Lowry presents not just a brilliant account of the battle for Fallujah, but also a useful overview of the history, economics, and culture of the region. Lowry shows what's great about the US military: skilled and powerful but also humanitarian and ultimately peace-seeking. Lowry's book is a must-read for anyone interested in how we won in Iraq." - Newt Gingrich, bestselling author and former Speaker of the House of Representatives


message 10: by 'Aussie Rick' (new)

'Aussie Rick' (AussieRick) Here is another new release but taken from a different perspective; "Paradise General: Riding the Surge at a Combat Hospital in Iraq" by Dr. Dave Hnida.

Paradise General Riding the Surge at a Combat Hospital in Iraq by Dave Hnida by Dave Hnida
Reviews:
"Paradise General will inspire, shock, and entertain you. Dr. Hnida brings a combat emergency room to life, from the infrequent quiet moments, leavened with wit, humor, and reflection, to the chaos of a midnight helicopter-borne cargo of mangled limbs. You can't help but be awed by the courage of Dr. Hnida and his fellow physicians as they work tirelessly to save the lives of countless patients, both friend and foe, without the right equipment, sleep, or complaint." — Craig M. Mullaney, (author of the New York Times bestseller The Unforgiving Minute: A Soldier's Education)

"Dave Hnida has written a wonderfully moving and frequently very funny book about his tour in a combat hospital in Iraq. When Hnida and his fellow doctors and nurses lose a soldier you grieve with them. You celebrate their victories over self-doubt and a sometimes cold Army bureaucracy. But what makes the book special is Hnida's perspective as a citizen-soldier who left behind a family and comfortable medical practice in Colorado for a war zone. Hnida's background as a suburban dad and doctor makes him a perfect guide through the confounding, terrifying, and strangely exhilarating world inhabited by the U.S. military in Iraq and Afghanistan.” — Greg Jaffe, (co-author of The Fourth Star and military correspondent for The Washington Post)

"I opened the book expecting to find a standard true-grit military memoir, but Hnida grabbed me by the throat on the first page. Paradise General is an honest and unflinching view of day to day life in a combat support hospital. What sets it apart from other accounts is the intimate look at the complicated motivations that drive a hometown doctor to answer the call to serve his country. Hnida bears witness to the carnage and trauma of war with humor, dignity, compassion and self-deprecation. As someone who has seen firsthand the devastation of these roadside bombs on families, I was brought inside the operating room and left with a greater respect for those who leave behind the comforts of home to serve." — Lee Woodruff, (co-author of In An Instant)

“In another era, Homer would be telling this tale. Why would a 48-year-old physician leave his family and a lovely Colorado town to crawl for his life through the bloody sands of Iraqi battlefields? Why would he stay, when terrorists were offering a bounty for the chance to cut off his head? Because, as we learn in Dr. David Hnida's unforgettable story, heroism can be another word for heartache. His tale of sacrifice and hope is a crucial, firsthand chronicle of our time and likely to become a classic of war literature.” — Christopher McDougall, (author of Born to Run)


message 11: by Charles (new)

Charles Rutledge | 2 comments Paradise General Riding the Surge at a Combat Hospital in Iraq by Dave Hnida
Certainly a different perspective. I was active duty (Medical Corps), this author-physician was a reservist who joined later in life and volunteered for Iraq. The writing is simple, but entertaining. The attitude is sardonic. Each chapter seemed to tell a seperate story, whether it's about treating insurgents or young Americans (at the same time). I thought I wouldnt care for it, but after the first chapter, I was hooked. As former military, I may be seeing this through different eyes, but do believe this is an enlightening read for anyone who wonders what it would be like to walk through the looking glass from the civilian world into a combat zone.


message 12: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 35741 comments Mod
Thank you Charles for the insider perspective. Your post is very much appreciated.

Also, thank you Aussie Rick for the original add.


message 13: by 'Aussie Rick' (last edited Apr 25, 2010 01:04AM) (new)

'Aussie Rick' (AussieRick) Hi Charles, it looks like a very interesting book so I ordered a copy. One book that you may appreciate on a similar topic is "Medic":

Medic Saving Lives - from Dunkirk to Afghanistan by John Nichol by John Nichol
Publishers blurb:
Their job is to put themselves in the heart of danger – to run into battle to rescue the wounded and to risk their own lives to try and save the dying. Doctors, nurses, medics and stretcher bearers go where the bullets are thickest, through bomb alleys and mine fields, ducking mortars and rockets, wherever someone is hit and the shout goes up – ‘Medic! We need a medic over here!’ War at its rawest is their domain, an ugly place of shattered bodies, severed limbs, broken heads and death. This is the story of those brave men – and, increasingly in this day and age, women – who go to war armed with bandages not bombs, scalpels not swords, and put saving life above taking life. Many have died in the process, the ultimate sacrifice for others. But wherever the cry of ‘Medic!’ is heard, it will be answered. From the beaches of Dunkirk to the desert towns of Afghanistan, there can be no nobler cause.


message 14: by 'Aussie Rick' (new)

'Aussie Rick' (AussieRick) I Have just finished "Kaboom" by Matt Gallagher and enjoyed it, a very easy to read account of a young officers tour in Iraq between 2008 and 2009. I have just ordered a copy of "My War: Killing Time in Iraq" by Colby Buzzell which also looks like an interesting first-hand account of this conflict.

Kaboom by Matthew Gallagher by Matthew Gallagher

My War Killing Time in Iraq by Colby Buzzell by Colby Buzzell
Publishers blurb:
A raw, edgy, yet intimate new voice from the front lines in Iraq-the most authentic we have had yet from the war, heralding this generation's Catch-22.
Like many of his generation, Colby Buzzell was jumping from one dead-end job to another, a paycheck away from moving back home. He spent his time skateboarding and killing as many brain cells as humanly possible. Tired of the monotony, he found himself in front of an army recruiter. Within months he was in Iraq, a machine gunner in the controversial Stryker Brigade Combat Team, an army unit on the cutting edge of combat technology, and the first of its kind.
This is the startlingly honest story of a young man and a war. Trapped amid "guerilla warfare, urban-style" in Mosul, Iraq, Buzzell was struck by the bizarre, absurd, often frightening world surrounding him. He began writing an online web log describing the war-not as it was being reported by CNN or in briefings on Capitol Hill, but as he experienced it. The result is an extraordinary narrative, rich with unforgettable scenes: the fierce firefight in which the resistance came from "men in black"; chain-smoking in the guard tower, counting the tracer rounds fired over the city; the raid on an Iraqi home during which a woman couldn't stop screaming as her husband was being taken away; and the hesitation of a young soldier who had been passed around from platoon to platoon because he was too afraid to fight. As the popularity of his "blog" grew, Buzzell became the embedded reporter the army couldn't control despite its best-and often hilarious-efforts to do so.
My War is the debut of a fresh and remarkable voice, and it is already being compared to the classics of youth and combat Herr's Dispatches and Heller's Catch-22. But My War is much more than a war story; it is the story of a generation caught between the hyper-reality of a technological age and an ever more complicated and dangerous world.

Review:
"With this relentlessly cynical volume, Buzzell converts his widely read 2004 blog into an episodic but captivating memoir about the year he spent serving as an army "trigger puller" in Iraq. Posted to Mosul in late 2003, Buzzell's platoon was ordered "to locate, capture and kill all non compliant forces." Accordingly, his entries describe experiences pursuing elusive guerrillas (aka "men in black"); enduring sniping, rocket and mortar attacks; and witnessing the occasional car bomb. Face-to-face fighting almost never occurs. No matter: though the combat scenes are exciting, this book is actually more engrossing as a portrait of the day-to-day life of a young American soldier who has "read, and re-read, countless times, every single one of [Bukowski's:] books." Like Bukowski, Buzzell appears to be a sentimental misanthrope; he pours scorn on everyone from cooks to generals to President Bush. He also despises the media, the antiwar movement and everyone who thinks they understand what's happening in Iraq. That his superiors kept their hands off his blog for several months, however, shows they understood that;despite its foul language, griping, insults directed at higher officers and occasional exposure of dirty linen;Buzzell's work never really wavers in its portrayal of American forces as the good guys in a dirty war." - Publishers Weekly


message 15: by 'Aussie Rick' (new)

'Aussie Rick' (AussieRick) This is another hard section to try and choose one book that was hard to put down. Can I fudge this by offering a few books covering different aspects of this period:

Imperial Life in the Emerald City Inside Baghdad's Green Zone by Rajiv Chandrasekaran by Rajiv Chandrasekaran

The Prince of the Marshes And Other Occupational Hazards of a Year in Iraq by Rory Stewart by Rory Stewart

House to House A Tale of Modern War by David Bellavia by David Bellavia

Fiasco The American Military Adventure in Iraq by Thomas E. Ricks by Thomas E. Ricks

The Forever War by Dexter Filkins by Dexter Filkins

Did anyone else enjoy any of these books or would like to offer their suggestion of the best book they have read on this subject?


message 16: by Michael (new)

Michael Flanagan (Loboz) I have read both House to House An Epic Memoir of War by David Bellavia by David Bellavia and The Forever War by Joe Haldeman by Dexter Filkins and found both of these excellent reads. I especially enjoyed House to House. Some of the books I have read on Iraq are:
Eight Lives Down The Story of a Counterterrorist Bomb-Disposal Operator's Tour in Iraq by Chris Hunter by Chris Hunter
Occupational Hazards by Rory Stewart by Rory Stewart
The Good Soldiers by David Finkel by David Finkel


message 17: by 'Aussie Rick' (new)

'Aussie Rick' (AussieRick) Hi Micheal, I have quite a few other good books to read on this subject, so many and so little time eh! I really enjoyed "House to House" and "The Forever War". Have you read Robert Fisk's book; "The Great War For Civilization"?

House to House An Epic Memoir of War by David Bellavia by David Bellavia

The Forever War by Dexter Filkins by Dexter Filkins

The Great War for Civilisation The Conquest of the Middle East by Robert Fisk by Robert Fisk


message 18: by Michael (new)

Michael Flanagan (Loboz) Hi Aussie Rick, I thought "House to House" was a fantastic and very personal book. Yet to read "Great War For Civilization", looks interesting though I'll add to my list to read. I must say since joining this group my thirst for reading has trebled.

House to House An Epic Memoir of War by David Bellavia byDavid Bellavia

Great War for Civilisation by Robert Fisk by Robert Fisk


message 19: by 'Aussie Rick' (new)

'Aussie Rick' (AussieRick) Hi Michael,

Have to agree with you about "House to House", excellent book. Its on the recommended reading list for the Australian Army. I think you will like Robert Fisk's book, he has written some very good books on the Middle East.

House to House by David Bellavia by David Bellavia

Great War for Civilisation by Robert Fisk and Pity the Nation Lebanon at War by Robert Fisk by Robert Fisk


message 20: by Michael (last edited Jun 27, 2010 10:06PM) (new)

Michael Flanagan (Loboz) Hi Aussie Rick,

Cool I'll check him out, I've foundÅsne Seierstad has written an interesting account of everyday life in Iraq A Hundred and One Days by Åsne Seierstad. I find her a very good author, she has also written other book's from other war zones. All in the same style, giving you a feel of what it's like to live in these area.


message 21: by 'Aussie Rick' (new)

'Aussie Rick' (AussieRick) I will have to check that book out Michael, it sounds pretty good. I like books that immerse you into the culture and life of another country. I have a few books like that that I am yet to read but soon maybe :)

Night Draws Near Iraq's People in the Shadow of America's War by Anthony Shadid by Anthony Shadid


Mirrors of the Unseen Journeys in Iran by Jason Elliot & An Unexpected Light Travels from Afghanistan by Jason Elliot by Jason Elliot


message 22: by 'Aussie Rick' (new)

'Aussie Rick' (AussieRick) Hi Andre, a very comprehensive and interesting list that many readers interested in the subject should enjoy browsing through.


message 23: by André, Honorary Contributor - EMERITUS - Music (new)

André (AndrH) | 2712 comments Mod
Thank you, Rick. They are all fantastic books!


message 24: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 35741 comments Mod
Sorry Andre..a great list but considered self promotion. I have to be consistent. When you get a chance enter a few at a time from goodreads as you always do.

You are a great contributor but we don't allow links to personal reviews, lists, blogs and the like.


message 25: by André, Honorary Contributor - EMERITUS - Music (last edited Jul 01, 2010 01:45AM) (new)

André (AndrH) | 2712 comments Mod
Thanks for letting me know, Bentley.
Since they are just great books and I don't receive anything for putting them into a list, I'd never have come up with that one. Though I don't understand the difference if I would put up the same list here - as you said, rules are rules. No problem.
All best,
André


message 26: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 35741 comments Mod
On goodreads, there are some who have authored blogs, books (most of the time only one), have done reviews and all they want rather than to be a contributing member is to sell or promote their stuff or get some votes or acclimation about their reviews and the like. Many of these folks do not contribute to the camraderie of the group in any way and some just join to even promote their groups and post ads for their own purposes or to get ideas which show up elsewhere. If we had not had the problem; we would obviously not have the rule. So now we just have to exercise the rule consistently even though in your case; I can certainly also understand your rationale.

Thank you for understanding.

Bentley


message 27: by André, Honorary Contributor - EMERITUS - Music (new)

André (AndrH) | 2712 comments Mod
Oh sure, Bentley, I know the kind you're talking about. They keep "reading" and reviewing their own "Five Star" books...
As I said, no problem here.
All best


message 28: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 35741 comments Mod
Thank you Andre.


message 29: by Richard (new)

Richard Lowry 'Aussie Rick' wrote: "Two new books covering one of the bloodier battles during this conflict is: "Operation Phantom Fury: The Assault and Capture of Fallujah, Iraq" by Dick Camp and "New Dawn: The Battles for Fallujah"..."

Rick,

I just joined goodreads yesterday. I look forward to becoming part of this thread.


message 30: by Richard (new)

Richard Lowry I would like to kick off my participation in this thread by recommending two books that help to tell the story of the fight to free Fallujah in November of 2004.

House to House An Epic Memoir of War by David Bellavia is a gripping tale of one soldier's street-to-street fight through Fallujah. It is a must read for anyone who wants to really understand what it was like to fight in Iraq.

On Call In Hell A Doctor's Iraq War Story by Cdr. Richard Jadick In stark contrast to "House to House," this book tells the stories of the men and women who risked their lives to save others.

These two books compliment one another to provide a real picture of the American serviceman - tough and compassionate, aggressive yet caring.

I wholeheartedly recommend both of these great books.


message 31: by André, Honorary Contributor - EMERITUS - Music (new)

André (AndrH) | 2712 comments Mod
Richard,
House to House is great. But your book is fantastic, too (from the fragments I read)
I just ordered a copy today and here you pop up on the site!
All best,
André


message 32: by Richard (new)

Richard Lowry Thank you Andre.


message 33: by 'Aussie Rick' (last edited Aug 24, 2010 03:11AM) (new)

'Aussie Rick' (AussieRick) Hi Richard, I think many people in this thread will welcome your comments. I see Andre is getting ready to read your latest book and I plan to read it next after my current book. Hopefully we will be both back to ask you some questions on "New Dawn".

New Dawn The Battles for Fallujah by Richard S. Lowry by Richard S. Lowry


message 34: by Richard (new)

Richard Lowry I have been asked to help with the moderation on this thread and a few others like Afghanistan and Desert Storm. If anyone has any questions they would like to post about books on the Global War on Terror, please send them my way.

There are many books available on this subject, some are great and some are not so good. One of my favorites is "For God and Country" by Brian Waite. It is pretty obscure and is not even listed on goodreads. But, it is worth searching for.


message 35: by Bryan, Honorary Contributor - EMERITUS (new)

Bryan Craig | 11685 comments Mod
Great Richard, I look forward to your suggestions. I'm new to this period, and I study the policy side of it for work, so it would be a great compliment.


message 36: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited Jul 23, 2010 08:12AM) (new)

Bentley | 35741 comments Mod
Richard wrote: "I have been asked to help with the moderation on this thread and a few others like Afghanistan and Desert Storm. If anyone has any questions they would like to post about books on the Global War on..."

Hi Richard...great add; but one of our rules (pesky but we want to take advantage of the goodreads software) is that we post the book cover, the author's photo when available and the author's link for any book cited. So I will repost the book so that the goodreads software can do its job, it populates our entire site with the links you post so anybody can check on which threads we are discussing a specific author and/or book.

Check out Aussie Rick's links and you will see.

For the books you mentioned I will add the links:

For God and Country One Chaplain's Perspective of War and the Life Lessons Learned by Brian K. Waite by Brian K. Waite (this is the book cited in message 34)

For message 30, the book covers are there. Great! We also have to add the author's photo and author's link. Sometimes the author's photo is available and sometimes not.

But we always add the link. I do notice that the book was completely cited above by Aussie Rick but we always add them again so that the citation can be tracked to your own personal post.

House to House An Epic Memoir of War by David Bellavia David Bellavia by David Bellavia (this is the book cited in message 30)

And when I looked up the above book, I indeed found an author's photo which had not been added by anybody...so I added it to this example.

On Call In Hell A Doctor's Iraq War Story by Cdr. Richard Jadick by Cdr. Richard Jadick (cited in message 30)

In the above example, the author did not have his photo available so this is how it would look.

For those folks new and wanting to find out how to do the above in excruciating detail...here is the link to the Mechanics thread:

http://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/2...

And Richard has kindly accepted the offer to help with the moderation of the threads on Iraq and Afghanistan. So if you have any question go to the Military History folder for Iraq and Afghanistan and post your query.

One of the military history moderators will respond to you. Richard's knowledge of Iraq and Afghanistan is deep so it is an honor to have him join us as an assisting moderator.


message 37: by Richard (last edited Jul 23, 2010 06:38PM) (new)

Richard Lowry Hello all and welcome,

I recently joined goodreads and Bentley has asked me to assist in the moderation of threads that pertain to the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. I have done extensive research on these subjects and I hope that I can contribute to everyone's understanding.

So, let's get started. I would suggest two very good books to help everyone lay a foundation for understanding Desert Storm first, and then we can move on to Operation Iraqi Freedom.


Ancient Iraq Third Edition (Penguin History) by Georges Roux provides an excellent history of the oldest civilization on the face of the earth. This is really where everyone should start when trying to understand current events in Iraq.

The Republic of Fear details the iron grip that Saddam Hussein had on the people of Iraq and his ruthless rise to power.

If anyone can recommend other good background books, please post your contribution.


message 38: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited Jul 23, 2010 09:32AM) (new)

Bentley | 35741 comments Mod
Republic of Fear: The Politics of Modern Iraq (no cover available on goodreads) by Samir al-Khalil (no photo available)

Ancient Iraq Third Edition (Penguin History) by Georges Roux by Georges Roux

Richard..just to help out I have reposted the two books cited using our required format.

Great start with post, thank you.


message 39: by André, Honorary Contributor - EMERITUS - Music (new)

André (AndrH) | 2712 comments Mod
Apart from all the terrific books already mentioned I also liked these two:
The Freedom Shadows and Hallucinations in Occupied Iraq by Christian Parenti by Christian Parenti
Joker One A Marine Platoon's Story of Courage, Leadership, and Brotherhood by Donovan Campbell by Donovan Campbell


message 40: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 35741 comments Mod
Richard wrote: "Hello all and welcome,

I recently joined goodreads and Bentley has asked me to assist in the moderation of threads that pertain to the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. I have done extensive research ..."


I have a question for you Richard, how did you get interested and involved in this subject matter.


message 41: by Richard (last edited Jul 23, 2010 02:07PM) (new)

Richard Lowry Good question Bentley. I have been interested in the military ever since I can remember. When I was in grammar school, our gardener gave me a pile of Army field manuals from WWII. I read every one of them. When in high school, I read "The Longest Day," and proceeded to write and present to the class 'The Longest Book Report."

I spent a good chunk of my life designing computer chips, running a company and raising three great sons.

Then, I sat memorized in front of my TV in 1990, as we prepared for war in Iraq. After the lightning 100 hour ground war, I sat there asking no one in particular (as my wife was just about ready to divorce me because of my new addiction to the TV war reports.) "What happened?"

The media never did tell us about the ground war, so I set out to find out.

It wasn't until 9/11 that I decided that someone needed to take the time to research and accurately tell the stories of our young men and women at war.


message 42: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 35741 comments Mod
That is interesting Richard. I also during that time period worked for a large computer firm; of course I am doing a lot of travel these days in other endeavors. I asked myself the same question...the difference is that you decided to finally do the research. So you waited until 2001 to actually start the ball rolling. That is interesting. I can understand the impact of that date living in the Metro New York City area...in fact I was living in NYC at the time. So you waited 11 years to even get started. How did you get that close to the research? You are not a military person, general, etc. and getting the accurate kind of information you needed would have been difficult. I would imagine that a large portion of it is still classified.

The Longest Day The Classic Epic of D-Day by Cornelius RyanCornelius Ryan

I posted the above because I am assuming you are referencing Ryan's book. Don't forget the citations.


message 43: by Richard (new)

Richard Lowry Bentley,

I actually started my research right after Desert Storm in 1991. Throughout the 90s I was building and running a design consulting company, raising three boys and paying more attention to my wife.

It really started as a curiosity and evolved into a hobby. I wrote every commanding general of every ground unit from Desert Storm and started getting mounds of reports, documents, maps and data. Being into computers, I quickly realized that the only way I could sort through all the data and put all the events in the proper sequence was to start putting a chronology together on my computer.

I worked on the project a couple hours each weekend for many, many years. Then, after 9/11 I got serious about publishing a book about Desert Storm. After so many years of research, it was relatively easy to make my chronology into a manuscript.

My Desert Storm Book was done solely through research. After completing that chronology, I knew that there would be an invasion of Iraq, so I started my initial research to prepare to write a sequel.

In the summer of 2003, I sent out my requests for information to all the generals again. This time, they were not all eager to provide information. Only two generals replied. MG David Petraeus who had commanded the 101st Airborne Division and BGen Richard Natonski, the Commanding General of the 2d Marine Expeditionary Brigade. His Marines had fought the battle of Nasiriyah and he personally invited me to come to Camp Lejeune to visit with him and some of his officers about that fight.

General Natonski helped me get the access I needed to write the story of the battle of Nasiriyah. Since then, we have become friends.

And, yes, some data remains classified. But, there are plenty of stories to tell without using any classified material. In some cases, I had to wait to get access to sensitive data. For instance, there were two Friendly Fire investigations conducted about the tragic A-10 incident in Nasiriyah. I was not given access to the results of these investigations until ALL the family members had been notified of the results.


message 44: by Richard (new)

Richard Lowry Bryan wrote: "Great Richard, I look forward to your suggestions. I'm new to this period, and I study the policy side of it for work, so it would be a great compliment."

I look forward to your contributions to our coming discussions.


message 45: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 35741 comments Mod
Richard wrote: "Bentley,

I actually started my research right after Desert Storm in 1991. Throughout the 90s I was building and running a design consulting company, raising three boys and paying more attention to..."


Thank you Richard for your explanation. That fills in the gaps. That was very nice of General Natonski and it was good of Petraeus to respond.

Bentley


message 46: by Richard (new)

Richard Lowry Both are great men. They are always concerned that the story of their soldiers and Marines is recorded for history.


message 47: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 35741 comments Mod
That is great.


message 48: by 'Aussie Rick' (new)

'Aussie Rick' (AussieRick) Here is a new acount covering a British Tank Regiment, Royal Scots Dragoon Guards, during Operation Iraqi Freedom in 2003.

Main Battle Tank by Niall Edworthy by Niall Edworthy
Publishers blurb:
The British Army’s Challenger II Main Battle Tank is one of the most awesome war machines ever built. In March 2003, three Squadrons of Challenger 2s from the Royal Scots Dragoon Guards, part of Britain’s 7th Armoured Brigade, the fabled Desert Rats, gathered in Southern Iraq to prepare for battle.The Army’s newest Big Guns were going to war for the first time. But Operation TELIC was a war which the Challenger 2, designed to operate in the fog and mud of the Central European Plain, had never been expected to fight. And one that would quickly break every rule of tank warfare including the golden maxim: never take a tank into a town. In Main Battle Tank, author Niall Edworthy, granted unprecedented access to the Scots DGs, tells the story of an extraordinary chapter in the history of British Army. From the terrifying rescue of a stricken Challenger 2 and countless nerve-shredding raids into Basra and Az Zubyar, to the biggest tank engagement fought by the British since the end of WWII, Main Battle Tank is the brutal, blistering true story of a war that tested man and machine to the bloody limit.


message 49: by André, Honorary Contributor - EMERITUS - Music (new)

André (AndrH) | 2712 comments Mod
Thanks, Rick. I tried finding a review - other than the publisher's blurb but haven't found any. Did you?
Best,
André


message 50: by 'Aussie Rick' (new)

'Aussie Rick' (AussieRick) Hi Andre, not yet, its just been released on the market so it may take a bit longer yet to get some reader feed-back. If I get a chance to read it soon I will give you an up-date.


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