Brain Science Podcast discussion

Tales from Both Sides of the Brain: A Life in Neuroscience
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2015 > BSP 117: Michael Gazzaniga

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message 1: by Ginger (new)

Ginger Campbell (GingerCampbell) | 311 comments Mod
BSP 117 with come out tomorrow. It is an interview with Dr. Michael Gazzaniga about his latest book Tales from Both Sides of the Brain: A Life in Neuroscience. I will post the links when the episode goes live.


message 2: by Ginger (new)

Ginger Campbell (GingerCampbell) | 311 comments Mod
Here are the links: BSP 117 Show notes and Audio MP3


message 3: by John (new)

John Brown | 52 comments It was exciting to hear Dr. Gazzaniga. When I started reading neuroscience, I bought his 2002 "Cognitive Neuroscience" textbook, which was enormously readable with very helpful colour illustrations. I notice that there have been later editions in 2008 and 2013, although the last is a bit outside my pocket. I bought two other student texts, but his was by far the clearest and most detailed.
I remember in particular his description of the conflicting lesion evidence on the functional split between Broca's and Wernicke's areas.
Then I thought about Pinker's fairly recent (unfruitful) attempts to identify one area with look-up tables, and the other with rules. He used the mapping from a verb to a past participle as a simple example of these two ways of doing things linguistically.
Dehaene has of course elucidated a lot of mysteries in text-reading. I suppose it is another order of magnitude of experimental difficulty to work with phonemes rather than letters.
The thought keeps occurring to me that grammar rules might in fact be an emergent phenomenon, given the operation of a constraint algorithm over a large number of collocations. In the area of collocations, at Brigham Young University they have collected these from Wikipeda:
http://corpus.byu.edu/wiki/
This is certainly worth playing with, although for it to support my speculations, they would have to add collocations of non-continuous words, and express them optionally in a more generic Part of Speech format.
Thanks to Marina Santini from the Text Analytics group on LinkedIn for this URL.
Marina is putting up all her very good lecture notes on computational linguistics, at that site.


message 4: by Ginger (new)

Ginger Campbell (GingerCampbell) | 311 comments Mod
John wrote: "It was exciting to hear Dr. Gazzaniga. When I started reading neuroscience, I bought his 2002 "Cognitive Neuroscience" textbook, which was enormously readable with very helpful colour illustrations..."

Thank you for sharing your ideas and the link from Dr. Santani.


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