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Holy Bible: King James Version
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FORBIDDEN HISTORY OF THE BIBLE > Banned books of the Bible

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message 1: by James, Group Founder (last edited Mar 08, 2015 07:19AM) (new)

James Morcan | 10092 comments In the beginning of Christianity there were not 4 Gospels as is commonly told, but actually 50+ Gospels...

This video is a great introuction to all the books that were edited out of the Bible by the Romans (for political reasons): https://www.goodreads.com/videos/8096...


message 2: by James, Group Founder (new)

James Morcan | 10092 comments My favorite lost/forbidden/banned books of the Bible include The Gospel of Thomas and The Gospel of Mary Magdalene. Both fantastic reads!

The Gospel of Thomas by Thomas O. Lambdin

The Gospel of Mary Magdalene by Anonymous


message 3: by James, Group Founder (new)

James Morcan | 10092 comments Edward wrote: "Its my understanding that there were just so many. I'd like to mention one; The Book of Barnabas; which may have particular significance to some of our friends."

What makes you think you/we still have any friends?


message 4: by Harry (new) - added it

Harry Whitewolf | 1745 comments This is a good overview book about the Gnostics:

The Gnostics


message 5: by David (new)

David Elkin | 501 comments I found Enoch books very interesting. Old testament stuff.

http://www.hiddenbible.com/enoch/onli...


message 6: by James, Group Founder (new)

James Morcan | 10092 comments David wrote: "I found Enoch books very interesting. Old testament stuff.

http://www.hiddenbible.com/enoch/onli..."


Hey David - I've read some of the Book of Enoch - isn't that the one which seems to be mentioning aliens?

What's also weird is the Book of Enoch is still mentioned in the Bible (Jude 1:14) which indicates it was formerly in the Bible but edited out.
Jude 1:14 "And Enoch also, the seventh from Adam, prophesied of these, saying, Behold, the Lord cometh with ten thousands of his saints,"


message 7: by David (new)

David Elkin | 501 comments What a surprise huh?

Enoch does talk about going up and seeing God in heaven. Fascinating descriptions. (Abduction?)

The book also mentions "The Watchers" (where I think Fringe TV show got it).

A real interesting site about Enoch here:
http://www.bibliotecapleyades.net/eno...


message 8: by James, Group Founder (new)

James Morcan | 10092 comments In Banned From The Bible: Books Banned, Rejected, And Forbidden author Joseph B. Lumpkin focuses on the following lost books from the Bible:

Section One: Lost Scriptures of the Old Testament
Enoch
Jubilees
Jasher

Section Two: Apocalyptic Writings and the End of Days
Apocalypse of Abraham
Apocalypse of Thomas
4 Ezra
2 Baruch

Section Three: Lost Scriptures of the New Testament
Gospel of Philip
Gospel of Mary Magdalene
Apocryphon of John
Gospel of Thomas
Gospel of Judas
Acts Chapter 29


However, my understanding is there are many more than these...


message 9: by David (new)

David Elkin | 501 comments Tons of them. James, I am enjoying the topic. You can dedicate a life time of research just on the Hebrew and Christian texts. Also, don't forget that other major religions have forbidden texts as well.


message 10: by James, Group Founder (new)

James Morcan | 10092 comments David wrote: "Tons of them. James, I am enjoying the topic. You can dedicate a life time of research just on the Hebrew and Christian texts. Also, don't forget that other major religions have forbidden texts as ..."

You're right David.
I am most fascinated by Judaism and its history.
One, because it seems to me to be the only truly monotheistic religion of the Middle East.
Two, because its the root of the other Abrahamic faiths.


message 11: by Jim (new)

Jim (jimliedeka) | 593 comments I have a book of the Nag Hamadi texts that includes some of the books mentioned above and many more. It's a fascinating blend of Gnostic, Hermetic, and Neo-Platonic thought with influences from all over. I wish I could have been a scholar in Alexandria in the first century. I think that's where a lot of stuff got synthesized.


message 12: by David (new)

David Elkin | 501 comments of course, life expectancy was a little shorter. Egypt is a lifetime study as well. Jim and James, we could start a book list that would stretch for miles if we wanted.

One of my favorite authors is Elaine Pagels. Her overview volume is worth the time: The Gnostic Gospels (Modern Library 100 Best Nonfiction Books


message 13: by Jim (new)

Jim (jimliedeka) | 593 comments I read that as well but don't remember details. Every now and then I pull out The Nag Hamadi Library and read something weird like Thunder, Perfect Mind.


message 14: by Tim (new)

Tim Pyke | 26 comments Hello, I am new. I read a good version of that book called Enoch- the book of God by Dr e v kenealy, it was originally written in late nineteenth century, but released again in 2007... Meant to be a more authentic translation, although I have not read other versions... Very interesting...


message 15: by James, Group Founder (last edited May 29, 2015 04:45PM) (new)

James Morcan | 10092 comments What I am seeking is real (original) Christianity. According to my research at least, original Christianity as taught by Jesus (a Jewish Essene) to his apostles, had aspects of the Eastern faiths (e.g. meditation, chants and other esoteric methods) but these were edited out of the Bible by the Romans. Many of the Eastern Orthodox churches (like the Coptics in Egypt) seem to still have traces of these esoteric elements in their religious practices.

I also think the original teachings of Christ were more feminine or at least male/female balanced (yin/yang) and that Mary Magdalene was very spiritually advanced and not a prostitute...But the Romans were very masculine and wanted to make Christianity a male-dominated religion: hence all the female characters in the Bible were reduced to being wall flowers and Magdalene rewritten to be a whore saved by Christ.

I found the following reference (and you can interchange "early church leaders" with Romans by the way):

According to an article at http://www.gospel-mysteries.net/mary-... , the idea that she was a prostitute may have been fabricated by early church leaders to discredit her, as part of an effort to exclude women from leadership roles in the church.


message 16: by David (new)

David Elkin | 501 comments Not sure I agree he was Essene. That is at best educated guess word. One of the Popes made MM a whore. I agree she was important to to the movement. I don't blame the Romans for changing the message, it is simply that St. Paul created Christianity.

I would recommend this book "James the Brother of Jesus: The Key to Unlocking the Secrets of Early Christianity and the Dead Sea Scrolls:" by Robert H. Eisenman

Another excellent book would be "Paul and Jesus: How the Apostle Transformed Christianity" by James Tabor I don't agree with everything Mr. Tabor writes, but I flat out recommend you read the Jesus Dynasty by him.

It makes you think.


message 17: by James, Group Founder (last edited May 29, 2015 06:21PM) (new)

James Morcan | 10092 comments David wrote: "Not sure I agree he was Essene. That is at best educated guess word. One of the Popes made MM a whore. I agree she was important to to the movement. I don't blame the Romans for changing the messag..."

Thanks for the recommendations - and yeah I have heard that he may not have been an Essene and admittedly there is a lot of guesswork with early Christianity.

And I certainly agree modern Christianity as we know it is Paul's worldview and also represents his interpretations (which were chosen by the Romans above all the other differing interpretations).

Brother of Jesus, my namesake, is also a very interesting character from that era and I agree may hold the keys to revealing the truth.

I happen to believe the truth will eventually come to light as more info is unearthed and other ancient texts are found. These truths will be uncomfortable revelations for many religious people, but perhaps are fairer and more balanced belief system will emerge...


message 18: by David (new)

David Elkin | 501 comments A. The truth is out there
B. They don't want you to know
C. It may be worse then we can imagine.

Have a great night James.


message 19: by Matt (new)

Matt | 68 comments The Da Vinci Code was more entertaining than the Bible even though it didn't make much sense


message 20: by David (new)

David Elkin | 501 comments I did enjoy the Da Vinci Code which was a good "ripoff" of one the hardest books I ever read.

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/6...


message 21: by David (new)

David Elkin | 501 comments However, I loved the book and recommend it to all who want to stretch their mind. I don't finally agree with all the premises but lord, I sure learned a boat load of stuff about the Merovingian dynasty. The argument that there really was a Priory of Sion is just not credible. The Wiki article does a very decent job of touching on the issues around the book. Secondly, since Jim read it I know I am in good company.


message 22: by Laureen (new)

Laureen (laureenandersonswfcomau) | 478 comments David wrote: "However, I loved the book and recommend it to all who want to stretch their mind. I don't finally agree with all the premises but lord, I sure learned a boat load of stuff about the Merovingian dy..."

I think the Priory of Sion did exist. Have a read of this article which is very informative, if you wish. www.bibliotecapleyades.net/sociopolit...


message 23: by Jim (new)

Jim (jimliedeka) | 593 comments At least some of the Priory stuff was a prank. I think Pierre Plantard ended up getting in some hot water over planting documents in the government registry.

While HBHG tells a compelling story, I've come to believe that the facts were cherry picked to fit the narrative. Plus, there is so much speculation beyond the facts that you can't really call it a history.

It was very influential, however. Nearly every modern conspiracy theory references it in some way.


message 24: by Matt (new)

Matt | 68 comments David wrote: "I did enjoy the Da Vinci Code which was a good "ripoff" of one the hardest books I ever read.

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/6..."


Thanks for the recommendation pal. 'Holy Blood, Holy Grail' seems an interesting book to read !


message 25: by David (new)

David Elkin | 501 comments Jim, checking out the link


message 26: by David (new)

David Elkin | 501 comments Hmm, link not working. Did they find out about us???

Correct link http://www.bibliotecapleyades.net/esp...

There is a ton of information here. Great find Jim


message 27: by David (new)

David Elkin | 501 comments Quote if from the website above: For the sake of the few who haven’t read the much-discussed Holy Blood, Holy Grail, it is well to review a few of the counter-claims of the egregious work.

The authors, Baigent, Lincoln and Leigh, argue that, while Paoli may have been an independent investigator, de Sede and Delaude appear to be members of the Priory of Sion and that their works are not intended to reveal much of the truth but just to arouse curiosity, controversy and mystery, and also to prepare the intellectual climate in France for whatever astounding political or religious revolution the Priory intends in the near future.

Specifically, Baigent, Lincoln and Leigh claim there is no evidence that Archbishop Lefebvre and his right-wing crowd have any link with the Priory; they assert that that asserted linkage is a Priory joke at Lefebvre’s expense. They also reject the extraterrestrial yarn, and replace it with their own lovely yarn that the Priory is descended from Jesus and his unacknowledged bride, Mary Magdalene.

It is worth mentioning at this point that the alleged romantic alliance between Jesus and Magdalene is not the invention of Baigent, Lincoln and Leigh. The Gnostic gospels - all as early and historically as plausible as the orthodox gospels - imply such a relationship several times, and Jesus is described as kissing Magdalene romantically in one celebrated text. It is also true that celibacy was regarded by orthodox Jews of Jesus’ time much as it is regarded in the post-Freudian world of today: namely, as a rather kinky, unmanly and somewhat reverse life-style.

Finally, Jesus is called “Rabbi” even in the orthodox gospels and no man could be a rabbi in orthodox Judea at that time who was not married. These facts are well known to occultists and freethinkers and have even been discussed, albeit gingerly, by a few liberal Christian theologians. What is unique about Holy Blood, Holy Grail is the claim that the offspring of Jesus and his bride are alive and among us today; but even that has a kind of precedent. That odd little cult, the British Israelites, have always claimed that the royal family of England is descended from the House of David - although they never claimed the descent was by way of Jesus, of course.

The shock that orthodox Christians feel at the concept of Jesus as husband and father is distinctly odd in historical perspective. The leaders of the other major patriarchal religions • Zoroaster, Buddha, Mohammed, Confucius - were all family men.

As for the pagan gods: some were family men, but some were also notorious fornicators. Christian sex-denial is a very strange and eccentric departure from the norms of world religion, in which fertility is generally considered sacred and venerated as one of the main manifestations of divine grace and beauty.

Be that as it may, at this point two suspicions cross a mind as baroque as mine. First, if certain books in French may be Priory propaganda disguised to look like outside investigations, as Baigent, Lincoln and Leigh claim, could their own Holy Blood, Holy Grail be more such propaganda, similarly disguised? And second, why do the authors, like de Sede, drag in many subjects which do not fit their own solution to the mysteries? Are they hinting or blandly raising smoke screens or are they just disorganized in their thinking?

(For instance, they spend almost as much space as de Sede on the bear-goddesses of Greece and France, but this has no logical connection with their Jesus/Magdalene theory any more than it has with de Sede’s Sirius theory. They also spend a lot of time on Poussin’s painting, The Shepherds of Arcadia, without ever really explaining its importance, although I think perhaps they are hinting that the grave in the painting is that of the son of Jesus and Magdalene, who evidently died in Rennes-le-Chateau in southern France. )

Concretely, at least Baigent, Lincoln and Leigh did manage to get an interview with a member of the Priory of Sion, and one who even admitted he was the Grandmaster of the whole lodge. This was the shadowy Pierre Plantard de Saint-Clair whom some of you may remember co-managed the Committee for Public Safety (under de Gaulle) from the office where the Priory’s magazine, Circuit, was published. M. Plantard was marvelously esoteric in his conversation with Baigent, Lincoln and Leigh. He neither confirmed nor denied their theory that he is descended from Jesus and Magdalene. He explained that the “treasure” in the Father Sauniere parchment was “spiritual” rather than “material” and added the helpful (or deliberately obscure) comment that this spiritual treasure “belongs to Israel” and will be returned there “at the proper time.”

Baigent, Lincoln and Leigh think the “treasure” is the royal bloodline of David and Jesus, which flows in the veins of M. Plantard and his young son..


message 28: by Martin (new)

Martin Hill (martinroyhill) | 125 comments James Morcan wrote: "In the beginning of Christianity there were not 4 Gospels as is commonly told, but actually 50+ Gospels...

This video is a great introuction to all the books that were edited out of the Bible by t..."


When people mention The Bible, I always ask, "Which one?" There are seven or eight accepted versions of the Bible (Catholic, Protestant, Orthodox, etc.). Some are shorter, some are longer, and they don't all say the same thing.

Within those seven or eight accepted versions of the Bible, are another 20 sub-variants.


message 29: by Paul (new)

Paul Sayers James Morcan wrote: "In the beginning of Christianity there were not 4 Gospels as is commonly told, but actually 50+ Gospels..."

Looking forward to the day when these lost texts are finally published again.

Oh! Here's one of them: http://www.maryofmagdala.com/GMary_Te...

There must be more ....


message 30: by Elisabet (new)

Elisabet Norris | 485 comments Paul, many of them are being used...The Ethiopian Church uses the gospel of Enoch. ..

Then there's also the discovery of the Dead Sea scrolls.
http://gnosis.org/library/dss/dss.htm
you should be able to find many of the gospels online. ..there's the gospel of thomas, the gospel of philip, the apocalypse of Peter. the apocalypse of Paul and many many more.


message 31: by Harry (new) - added it

Harry Whitewolf | 1745 comments It's those ones in the Vatican vault I wanna read!


message 32: by James, Group Founder (new)

James Morcan | 10092 comments Harry wrote: "It's those ones in the Vatican vault I wanna read!"

Don't worry, Harry, Undergrounders will soon be able to access the Vatican secret archives, with any luck.
(Just need to find someone who can remote view them all and remotely scan them into the physical...)


message 33: by Elisabet (last edited Jan 10, 2016 06:07AM) (new)

Elisabet Norris | 485 comments Harry wrote: "It's those ones in the Vatican vault I wanna read!"

I used to be very curious about the books the Vatican keeps hidden, but since I don't believe the scriptures to be anything except stories (told so many times over so many years) that have been edited or only written from memory in a similar manner as the Phone game (sit in a circle and whisper the same word). There is no way to know from these books what really happened and/or whether they are bedtime stories or journal entries.

Then you have Emperor Constantine who invented Christianity, but in actuality worshiped the Sun God (hence Sunday the day of rest, rather than Saturday)....


message 34: by Elisabet (new)

Elisabet Norris | 485 comments James Morcan wrote: "Harry wrote: "It's those ones in the Vatican vault I wanna read!"

Don't worry, Harry, Undergrounders will soon be able to access the Vatican secret archives, with any luck.
(Just need to find some..."


I'll dress up as the Pope and smuggle them out.


message 35: by Elisabet (last edited Jan 10, 2016 06:16AM) (new)

Elisabet Norris | 485 comments Pope Leo the 10th: "It has served us well, this myth of Christ."

I've heard something about Jesus being taught in a secret school called Essenes.... this story is starting to sound all to familiar... perhaps the real reason for his death had nothing to do with being the Messiah ;)

I guess Jesus also went to India and learned about Buddha and some other "stuff".

Lots of interesting reads out there...


message 36: by Jim (new)

Jim (jimliedeka) | 593 comments That Pope Leo quote is from a play written by a Protestant, not an actual quote. That said, I'm sure there have been a fair number of popes who weren't really believers.


message 37: by Elisabet (new)

Elisabet Norris | 485 comments Jim wrote: "That Pope Leo quote is from a play written by a Protestant, not an actual quote. That said, I'm sure there have been a fair number of popes who weren't really believers."

Good to know, Jim... thanks! I obviously didn't do in depth research on the quote :)


message 38: by David (new)

David Elkin | 501 comments Good catch Jim. It is always important to remember that the "banned" books were done by historical people.

It was actually not until 367 AD that the church father Athanasius first provided the complete listing of the 66 books belonging to the canon. Quoted from http://www.biblica.com/en-us/bible/bi...

Also see; http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/11044...

However, an important note: Contrary to popular belief, the council had nothing to do with selecting which verses and gospels would be included in the Bible, nor whether Christianity agreed or disagreed with the concept of reincarnation. Bishops did not burn books they deemed heretical there either, historians say.


message 39: by Paul (new)

Paul Sayers David wrote: "Contrary to popular belief, the council had nothing to do with selecting which verses and gospels would be included in the Bible, nor whether Christianity agreed or disagreed with the concept of reincarnation. Bishops did not burn books they deemed heretical there either, historians say."

Oh! They're absolved!

Isn't it tiresome, there's always a divergent opinion, forcefully argued. What is the truth? Every time we get to narrow in on the culprit a little white flag is hoisted up by a po-faced "expert historian".

What's the price of an expert these days?

The revisionists revise the revisions -

The Spirit can guide us. We lean not on our own understanding (the understanding of man). Intuition may whisper the truth.

Ultimately though we possibly all need a renewed conversation with God, a systems reset. Perhaps when each of us is ready we can, or when enough of us are ready all will be revealed. In God's time.

Then follows another millennium a creeping shadows -


message 40: by Paul (last edited Jan 10, 2016 03:47PM) (new)

Paul Sayers Lisa wrote: "Paul, many of them are being used...The Ethiopian Church uses the gospel of Enoch. ..."

Thank you, Lisa. It will be something to witness these works (what fragments remain) even refracted form such great distance of time through the cracked dusty telescope of imperfect translation.

How many reinterpretations did those early works endure even in their own time?

When there is a manifestation of spirit in our modern world the books for the coming epoch will be written, a third testament. I pray that it will be a unifying chapter, full of peace, grace, to the shame of those who would use the name of God to perpetrate violence, a damning indictment of unholy crusades medieval and modern.

Jesus was and is the keystone. All the peoples of the world are sons and daughters of God.

I am not convinced that we even need books to prove that.


message 41: by John (new)

John Triptych | 19 comments The Gospel of Mani, Aztec and Mayan codexes, and a whole lot of other books that they don't want public (just a guess).


message 42: by David (new)

David Elkin | 501 comments or perhaps ban books that refute conventional theory?


message 43: by Jim (new)

Jim (jimliedeka) | 593 comments Speaking to an earlier point, I have grave doubts that there was a historical Jesus. The gospels are almost totally plagiarized from pagan sources about a dying and resurrected solar deity which symbolizes the changing of the seasons. Hiram Abiff fulfills the same function in Masonic lore.

I think that what we know as Christianity is like movies on the Spice channel. Instead of being pornography with the pornography taken out, it's a religion with the religion taken out. The real Christians were Gnostics. They were later killed as Heretics. They came back as the Bogomils and Albigensians and were killed again. They came back again as the Rosicrucians but no one cared because science was becoming more important than religion so they withered on the vine. They came back again as western ceremonial magicians (Golden Dawn, etc.) but were ignored as kooks.


message 44: by James, Group Founder (new)

James Morcan | 10092 comments BANNED FROM THE BIBLE The Stories That Were Deleted From Biblical History
The History Channel -- http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-r...

"The two-hour world premiere BANNED FROM THE BIBLE airs on Christmas, Thursday, December 25 at 9 pm ET/PT. The Life of Adam and Eve, The Book of Enoch, The Book of Jubilees, The Infancy Gospel of Thomas, The Gospel of Mary, The Apocalypse of Peter...these are just a few of the books that were left out of the Bible."


Mikhayla Gracey | 270 comments Nice James. Thinking is an option these days. The concerning Christians are no longer able to prevent an education and the ability of the people to read for themselves and decide. There is no longer the threat of being burned at the stake for free thought. We have an opportunity to take a look at what they were up to. Let's have a peek.


message 46: by David (new)

David Elkin | 501 comments Hopefully the treatment is historical and not like the Ancient Aliens show (though I kinda still like it). Thanks for the tip. I have read much of the Book of Enoch .


message 48: by James, Group Founder (new)

James Morcan | 10092 comments Who Was the Mysterious “Disciple Whom Jesus Loved?” https://jamestabor.com/who-was-the-my...


message 49: by Harry (new) - added it

Harry Whitewolf | 1745 comments James wrote: "Who Was the Mysterious “Disciple Whom Jesus Loved?” https://jamestabor.com/who-was-the-my..."

I have heard before that this referred to either his brother James or Mary Magdalane. Both hypotheses seem credible, but I think the latter's more plausible.


message 50: by James, Group Founder (new)

James Morcan | 10092 comments Stop trying to diminish the brotherly love my bro Jesus has for me, mate! :)


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