The American Civil War discussion

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message 1: by Chris (last edited Aug 25, 2016 11:52AM) (new)

Chris (mrpotter) | 9 comments Mod
I don't know if that is a good title or not, but which person or battle do you feel doesn't get enough coverage by historians?


message 2: by Rob (last edited Aug 25, 2016 11:52AM) (new)

Rob McMonigal | 3 comments I would say the cavalry in general, but the Eastern Cavalry Battlefield at Gettysburg is so unused that on a prime Saturday afternoon, there were only a few people around, and similarly little signage.


message 3: by Chris (last edited Aug 25, 2016 11:58AM) (new)

Chris (mrpotter) | 9 comments Mod
I would really like to find something that is well written on a non-western and non-eastern theater. For example, every once in a while, I will come across an anecdote on something that happened during the war in New Mexico territory or in Vermont. I know they aren't big topics, but I'd like to see a little more on them.


message 4: by Rob (last edited Aug 25, 2016 11:58AM) (new)

Rob McMonigal | 3 comments I have a book about the really Western (i.e. Texas) theatre that's on my really-deep to-read list.


message 5: by Dan (last edited Aug 25, 2016 01:11PM) (new)

Dan | 5 comments Currently reading "Ride Like the Devil"
Edward Leslie- a biography of William Clarke Quantrill- although it is some what disjointed, it is interesting and it does cover the Border Ruffian/Bushwhacker/Jayhawker partisan warfare comprehensively- there are no innocent active participants. The fallout with the Jesse James/Cole Younger outlawry an outgrowth of this border warfare is fascinating.
Ang Lee has made a movie with a similar title- it may be "Ride With the Devil"
with Tobey McGuire, Skeet Ulrich, Jim Caviezel, and Jewel that covers the same period from a bushwhacker's point of view and includes the Lawrence Kansas 1863 Raid


message 6: by Dan (last edited Aug 25, 2016 01:11PM) (new)

Dan | 5 comments Correction: The tile is "The Devil Knows How to Ride" by Edward Leslie- i suppose i could have looked it up on Good Reads oh well


message 7: by pete (new)

pete | 26 comments i'm glad you mentioned that movie. i came across it accidently on tv and really enjoyed it. never saw it listed in theatres...



message 8: by Donald (new)

Donald (donf) The Battle of Cross Keys. I have an interest since some units that became the 11th Corps were involved, most particularly the 1st Ohio Light Artillery, lead by Hubert Dilger, the Medal of Honor recipient at Chancellorsville. He won the award for holding back Stone Wall Jackson primarily with his batteries and some of the retreating infantry that Gen Carl Schurz was able to keep together. The only book I could find about the Battle that was not part of the larger Shenandoah campaign was Battlefield: Farming a Civil War Battleground by Peter Svenson. I have not read it yet but it is about an artist who purchased land within the battlefield, not primarily a book about the Battle.


message 9: by Jan C (new)

Jan C (woeisme) | 160 comments Donald wrote: "The Battle of Cross Keys. I have an interest since some units that became the 11th Corps were involved, most particularly the 1st Ohio Light Artillery, lead by Hubert Dilger, the Medal of Honor rec..."

It was interesting and alternated between the battle and his trying to set up the farm - going to auction sales to buy machinery, seeking advice from neighbors, etc. IIRC, he cites from letters, diaries and official reports to describe the battle.

He also has a second book, Preservation. I haven't started it yet.


message 10: by Donald (new)

Donald (donf) Jan - Thanks so much for the information on this book! I have the book now listed under - "Books to read if I live to be a hundred!" As mentioned, I have an interest in regiments of the 11th Corps both before becoming the 11th Corps and after the Corps was disbanded. There is one book I have in my collection that deals with a former 11th Corps officer - Thomas Osbourne, the Artillery Commander of the 11th at Gettysburg and Hubert Dilger's commanding officer - entitled "The Fiery Trail" and it covers Sherman's March. (There is another thread in this group that deals with books on Sherman.) It's probably been 20 years since I read it but remember being impressed at the time.
This thread deals not only with underrated battles but of underrated people also. I would nominate Gen Henry Jackson Hunt artillery commander at Gettysburg. Although well known to the students of the battle, how many of the more casual observers know that on the 3rd day, the battle came down to artillery - the ineffectiveness of the Confederate, and the super effectiveness of the Union's?(One of my favorite images of the battle is Gen Carl Schurz, who during the Confederate bombardment, walked above his troops, who were cowering behind logs inside ditches, smoking a cigar and trying to convey to his troops to be calm.)Lee's decision to send "Pickett's"
men across a mile of unprotected terrain to attack an easily defended higher ground was one of history's greatest acts of arrogance and stupidity. Hunt's competence, diligence, resourcefulness and PATIENCE, carried the day.(Lee had seen Hunt's work before at Malvern Hill and Antietam, so you've got to wonder. Even the great men have bad days!)


message 11: by James (new)

James | 25 comments Donald wrote: "The only book I could find about the Battle that was not part of the larger Shenandoah campaign was Battlefield: Farming a Civil War Battleground by Peter Svenson..."

Yes, this is the only one I know of too. It is an easy read by the owner of the property that the battlefield largely sits on. Its a minor engagement with only a few hundred casualties. I liked the book, and if you interest is from a brigade that fought there I would recommend it to you.


message 12: by Donald (new)

Donald (donf) Thanks James, I did pick up the book at the local Library. Looking through it but will probably hold off on reading for the future.


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