Historical Mystery Lovers discussion

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Genre Discussions > Historical Cozies

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message 1: by Lauren (new)

Lauren (laurenjberman) | 1664 comments Mod
Do you like reading cozy mysteries? How about cozy mysteries with a historical theme? Come and share your discoveries.


message 2: by D.G. (new)

D.G. Not sure where to ask this question...has anybody read the Gaslight Mysteries? (they are set in NYC probably in the mid to late 1800s.) The first book is Murder on Astor Place - as a New Yorker, I love reading books set here so I'm interested to see what's the deal. Too bad they don't seem to be out in audio!


message 3: by Lauren (new)

Lauren (laurenjberman) | 1664 comments Mod
I'd also be interested in input on the series, D.G. I have the first book on my TBR.


message 4: by Sandy (new)

Sandy | 1087 comments D.G. wrote: "Not sure where to ask this question...has anybody read the Gaslight Mysteries? (they are set in NYC probably in the mid to late 1800s.) The first book is Murder on Astor Place - as a ..."

I've read all the gaslight series and enjoy them very much. I believe they historically accurate. They have a romantic element. I read them in order (as I do all series) and the characters' lives change. Some have more fantastical (I remember a rooftop chase I thought unlikely) than realistic solutions but the story is always interesting and a different area or ethnic group is highlighted in each book.


message 5: by Lauren (new)

Lauren (laurenjberman) | 1664 comments Mod
Thanks Sandy. I enjoy a little romance with my mystery so that's really helpful.


message 6: by Veronica (new)

Veronica  (readingonthefly) | 691 comments I've also really enjoyed the Gaslight Mysteries. I discovered the series last year when I saw the first book in a used book store. I'd never heard of it but I bought it, read it, and promptly went back to the store to buy out the rest of the series. Then I read them all over a two week period. I don't consider myself a history expert by any means but it feels pretty authentic to me for the most part. I love the two main characters. There is a romance element but, fair warning, it is veeerrrrryyy slow moving.


message 7: by Lauren (new)

Lauren (laurenjberman) | 1664 comments Mod
Veronica wrote: "There is a romance element but, fair warning, it is veeerrrrryyy slow moving. "

That's OK. I enjoy a slow burn.


message 8: by D.G. (new)

D.G. Oh thanks! I'll add the book to my TBR.


Susanna - Censored by GoodReads (susannag) | 463 comments I read Murder on Astor Place a few years ago; I was 'eh' on it. (I figured out the mystery pretty quickly, for one thing.) A lot of people seem to like these mysteries, though. (Can't hurt to give it a try!)


message 10: by M. (new)

M. Myers (mruth) | 8 comments M. Louisa Locke's Victorian San Francisco series gives nice insight into the lives of working women of that era, along with city history and, of course, a mystery. The Ezra Melamud mysteries by Libi Astaire are absolutely delightful and different. They take place in Regency London's Jewish community.


message 11: by Britney (new)

Britney (tarheels) | 35 comments I ran across The Rules of Murder by Julianna Deering by accident one day when it was on sale. It takes place in England. I really enjoyed it. It kept my attention even though it wasn't intense. I have seen mixed reviews about it.


message 12: by Lynn (last edited Dec 24, 2015 03:18AM) (new)

Lynn (lynnali) | 60 comments Ashley Gardner has a great Regency series featuring Captain Gabriel Lacey.

Charles Finch's Charles Lenox series is well worth the read, too.

If you're willing to do some searching for out-of-print books, I found Margaret Miles Bracebridge series very good. And Hannah March's Robert Fairfax mysteries are good too.

But I think my favorite historical mysteries so far have been:
Kerry Greenwood's Phryne Fisher (the books are much better than the television adaptations);
Rosemary Stevens's Beau Brummel; and
Kate Ross's Julian Kestrel.


message 13: by Michelle (new)

Michelle Cox | 221 comments Lynn wrote: "Ashley Gardner has a great Regency series featuring Captain Gabriel Lacey.

Charles Finch's Charles Lenox series is well worth the read, too.

If you're willing to do..."


I really like the Phryne Fisher series, too!


message 14: by Portia (new)

Portia | 32 comments I'm always pitching Margaret Fraser. She has at least two series -- Sister Frevisse and Joliffe The Player. And, of course, we always have Anne Perry. Also, I Just picked up a copy of Death Comes As Epiphany. I've heard good things about Sharan Newman's books. And don't forget Stephanie Barron and her Jane Austen series.


message 15: by Michelle (new)

Michelle Cox | 221 comments Lauren wrote: "Thanks Sandy. I enjoy a little romance with my mystery so that's really helpful."

Ditto!


message 16: by Michelle (new)

Michelle Cox | 221 comments Portia wrote: "I'm always pitching Margaret Fraser. She has at least two series -- Sister Frevisse and Joliffe The Player. And, of course, we always have Anne Perry. Also, I Just picked up a copy ..."

Lynn wrote: "Ashley Gardner has a great Regency series featuring Captain Gabriel Lacey.

Charles Finch's Charles Lenox series is well worth the read, too.

If you're willing to do..."

Great recommendations, Portia. Thanks!


message 17: by Michelle (new)

Michelle Cox | 221 comments M. wrote: "M. Louisa Locke's Victorian San Francisco series gives nice insight into the lives of working women of that era, along with city history and, of course, a mystery. The Ezra Melamud mysteries by Lib..."

Thanks for these - new to me!


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